MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- When many of us think of wounded warriors, we think of service members injured or wounded downrange, during a deployment or in combat. Pfc. Kyia Costanzo, and her Team Army family participating in the 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games would say otherwise. Costanzo was injured while in Basic Combat Training, suffering multiple severe injuries, leading to a long journey that has brought her to the DoD Warrior Games in Tampa, Florida.

"My team is comprised of so many incredible Soldiers, who have made so many sacrifices for this country, and for me, have been incredible about the fact that I did not complete training. They told me we all signed up to do the same thing, you just got hurt in the process after volunteering to serve your country. You deserve to be here," Costanzo recalled. "That was really significant to me beyond words."

Now a soldier at Joint-Base Lewis-McChord's Warrior Transition Battalion, Costanzo took up adaptive sports to help cope with her injuries, sharpen her focus, and motivate herself towards the next steps ahead of her. Costanzo is competing in the archery and swimming events at Warrior Games.

"When I first got to the WTB at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, I heard about adaptive sports, and I was curious as to how injured Soldiers can still do sports like basketball and volleyball. Then I saw it in person and was amazed! The more I got introduced to the programs, the more fascinated I became. It's been life changing. When you are told that you will have limitations on you for the rest of your life, and you can't do certain things ever again, programs like this are life changing," said Costanzo.

"Adaptive sports for me, has built confidence and makes me feel as if I'm still doing something to raise awareness in the community about wounded, injured and ill Soldiers. It was painful to say goodbye to things like hiking that was painful initially. But getting involved in adaptive sports gave me a new outlet, like I didn't lose something, but gained new physical activities I could do," Costanzo added.

WTBs similar to Costanzo's are the cornerstone of the Warrior Care and Transition Program and play a vital role in helping our wounded, ill and injured Soldiers as they pursue to recover and overcome. The U.S. Army has established WTBs at major military treatment facilities at 14 military installations. The DoD Warrior Games are a culmination of adaptive sports reconditioning that takes place in the WTBs, in the form of an adaptive sports competition for the athletes selected to participate.

"Being a part of this program keeps you part of Team Army," Costanzo said. "I can't tell you how much adaptive sports, the Warrior Games, and specifically Team Army have helped me stay positive on what's happening and to be excited about what's going to happen for me in the future."

The 2019 DoD Warrior Games will run from June 21-30 in Tampa, Florida. The athletes participating in the competition are comprised of wounded, ill and injured service members and veterans representing the United States Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and Special Operations Command. Athletes from the United Kingdom Armed Forces, Australian Defence Force, Canadian Armed Forces, Royal Armed Forces of the Netherlands, and the Danish Armed Forces are also competing in this year's DoD Warrior Games.

For more information about the 2019 DoD Warrior Games visit: https://dodwarriorgames.com