FORT CARSON, Colo. -- While picking up parts for his vehicle at a local hardware store in Fountain, a horizontal construction engineer with Alpha Company, 52nd Brigade Engineer Battalion, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, recently encountered a unique situation.

"As I got closer to the store, I noticed that the manager was standing in front of the doorway blocking the entrance," said Pfc. Adrian Vetner, a native of Umtentweni, South Africa. "A man was trying to get past the manager and he had power tools in his hand. He was clearly trying to rob the store."

The robber was somehow able to get past the manager and ran toward the exit, Vetner said.

"At that moment, without hesitation, I ran - grabbed him - threw him to the ground and held him until the manager took over," Vetner said. "I didn't hesitate or think about it twice because at that moment I knew it was the right thing to do."

Vetner's personal courage and eagerness to help those around him didn't stop there.

Six days after stopping the robbery, Vetner was once again put in a situation where his assistance was needed, this time it involved a fellow Soldier.

"I was on my way to work and it was snowing out, and I saw someone had broken down on the side of the road," he said. "Their tire was laying down a couple feet behind him. I helped him get his new tire on by lending him my jack, made sure he was good to go and went on with my day."

However, for Vetner, those actions were nothing out of the norm.

He credits his upbringing in a military family and his father, who is a retired colonel in the South African military, for his acts of courage and selflessness.

"I was raised to do the right thing at all times even when no one is watching," he said. "Sometimes people get the wrong idea [about] military personnel, and if I can do little things here and there to change that mindset, I am happy to do so."

Capt. Cory Plymel, who recently took command of Alpha Company, said hearing of Vetner's actions made him feel proud to become part of the company.

"The fact that we have Soldiers who live the Army values on a constant basis is very fulfilling," Plymel said. "To see someone put those values into action and show what right looks like, especially in such a young Soldier, just shows how great our Soldiers are."

Plymel said he hopes that Vetner's actions send a greater message, not only to junior Soldiers but to all Soldiers.

"I think it speaks volumes that someone who is not from the U.S. is serving this country and performing these acts of courage and kindness without thinking twice about it," Plymel said. "It's very humbling to see that and it speaks volumes about the Soldiers we have in our Army regardless of where they are from."