FORT CARSON, Colo. -- With a baby on the way, Spc. Donald Ulloa and his wife were up all night preparing for the arrival of a new child. With no such luck on this particular day, he went about his normal routine.

Ulloa, a Soldier with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, was at a gas station with his Family in the car when he witnessed a vehicle accident. He looked toward the road and saw a car hit a motorcyclist before the motorcyclist flew through the air.

His Soldier skills kicked in and he didn't hesitate, he ran toward the accident and immediately began to assess the situation. He quickly realized the bike on the motorcyclist's leg needed to be moved, so he threw the bike off the man before looking around to delegate tasks. One person called 911 and another woman was able to translate from Spanish to English for Ulloa, while he began applying his combat lifesaver course techniques until emergency services arrived.

"That's just the type of Soldier he is," said Sgt. 1st Class Billy Thornton, human resources NCO, HHC, 1st Bn., 38th Inf. Reg., 1st SBCT. "To be the first one on scene was great -- whether here or overseas - he would do the same. I was surprised by the event, but not by Ulloa's actions. I had immediate praise for him."

When it comes to chaotic events, Thornton said he knows Ulloa is always ready. The office staff is constantly training to be prepared for any situation, and Ulloa is always looking for ways to improve.

The military taught Ulloa to remain calm in hectic situations. Whether on a range, at a shoot house or downrange, Ulloa said the first thing he realized was that he needed to be calm. But looking back, he believes he did what anyone else would have done.

"I don't think that I could have done anything differently ... as infantrymen we are taught to run toward it and provide help," he said.

Not wanting to see any child grow up without a parent, Ulloa said it doesn't matter who it is. He would have done the same for anyone, because he believes "it's everyday Soldier training; its selfless service, sacrifice, integrity ... day one or 20 years later it's all the same core values that are instilled in you."

Ulloa's quick actions that day demonstrated only a fraction of the Soldier he is.

"I've only known Ulloa since May of this year," Thornton said. "We showed up at Fort Carson at the same time. He does everything he is asked and in a timely manner, and he is respectful to superiors and peers. He is a model Soldier."

He recently was named "4th Infantry Division and Fort Carson Soldier of the Week" for his accomplishments within the unit. The company started a program that prepares the brigade for deployments, called "Raider Onboard." The unit ensures Soldiers are deployable with the three-week program by ensuring their paperwork and annual online classes are completed. The second week focuses on buddy aid and the combat lifesavers course, and week three hones in on driver training and issuing military licenses.

Since June, Ulloa has processed nearly 900 Soldiers through the program, making the unit, battalion, and brigade more readily deployable.

"Because of the manning, it became difficult," Thornton said, before asking Ulloa to help as an assistant instructor. "Ulloa just took over ... that when I came in; my commander and sergeant major said they wanted a volunteer program."

Before moving to Fort Carson, Ulloa completed hundreds of volunteer hours, without recognition, at his last duty station.

So it was right up his alley when he was asked to pitch in with the unit's designated driver program.

Ulloa earned his volunteer service medal by doing various things with the unit. He also volunteered for cleanup through the city of Colorado Springs, including gathering about 50 people to help clean up the area.

"It was a massive undertaking," Thornton said.

He volunteered to raise money through a silent auction for a children's hospital. This along with many other volunteer events is what pushed him over his hours for his first Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal.

"It was my pleasure to write up his award. Ulloa is about to receive his second volunteer service medal," Thornton said.

It takes many Soldiers years to get the award, but he is not surprised Ulloa is about to earn his second. Thornton said he can always count on Ulloa in areas where volunteers are needed.

"Ulloa's work ethic and values supersede his rank," he said.

Thornton said that regardless of the task, he is confident when Ulloa fills in for him, he "takes it and runs with it."

Thornton said he has worked with a lot of good Soldiers and despite the recent attention on Ulloa, he is humble about it.

Ulloa said he wasn't looking for recognition but instead wanted the unit to be highlighted for the designated driver program.

Because of the program that Ulloa helped set up, other Soldiers have come forward to volunteer as part of the program and some have chosen to quit drinking because of this program, he said. And to date the 1st Bn., 38th Inf. Reg., 1st SBCT, does not have any DUIs.

Due to an accident while serving, Ulloa is set to get out of the Army soon.

"I wish Ulloa the best of luck," Thornton said. "I hope he continues to support his community and I am quite sure he will."