NEW YORK ― The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, North Atlantic Division (NAD), remains fully engaged with local and national agencies in support of response and recovery efforts from impacts of Hurricane Florence.

"Our thoughts and prayers remain with the communities in the south who have been impacted by this devastating storm," said Maj. Gen. Jeffrey L. Milhorn, North Atlantic Division Commander."

As the remnants of Hurricane Florence heads out to the Atlantic, dam and levee safety experts continue monitoring the Division's 54 dams, more than 650 miles of levees, and 22 storm and hurricane barriers to ensure they function as designed. They are also working with local municipalities to provide flood fighting measures, such as sandbags and engineering expertise, while also keeping an eye on our region's ports and bridges, and supporting the flood fighting needs of our military installations.

NAD is supporting the overall Army Corps response and recovery efforts as part of the federal response led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. To that end, NAD has sent teams of experts to the Carolinas to conduct infrastructure assessments, and levee and dam safety technical expertise. We're also providing specialized flood fighting tools, including 14,000 linear feet of rapidly deployable flood fighting barriers provided by Philadelphia District. As the efforts shift from response to recovery, NAD experts will stand ready to deploy any number of experts from levee repair to navigation and temporary housing, among others.

NAD executes a diverse set of missions of the Army Corps throughout 14 states in the northeast as well as throughout Europe, Africa and anywhere in the world where we are needed. Headquartered at Fort Hamilton, in Brooklyn, New York, the division provides engineering, construction, project management and contracting services to plan, design, build, operate and maintain projects to support the military, protect America's water resources, and restore and enhance the environment. The work includes projects for international, federal, state, and local governments and agencies.

Overall, NADs flood risk management projects throughout the region prevent about $754 million in damages each year.