Fort Bliss WTB CSM relinquishes responsibility, retires
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Warrior Transition Battalion held a relinquishment of responsibility ceremony where Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew Unger relinquished responsibility as the unit's senior enlisted advisor to interim senior enlisted advisor, Master Sgt. Michael Baker, at Fort Bliss, Aug. 21.

Unger, whose assignments span from human resources commands to the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), is retiring after serving with the WTB since October 2016.

"Thank you for your strength and compassion to the Soldiers and their families," said Maj. Marvin Switzer, commander, WTB, addressing Unger during the ceremony. "The WTB was lucky to have a leader with your talent, passion and courage at a central point in a Soldier's career, the point of integration back into the fight or the scary transition into civilian life."

In 2007 Warrior Transition Units were created to provide personal support to wounded Soldiers who require at least six months of rehabilitative care and complex medical management. Assignment as part of a WTB cadre is considered an important mission, essential to a Soldier's successful transition.

"I'm humbled and proud to have had the opportunity to work alongside all (the cadre)," said Unger. "I truly believe we are achieving a common goal of taking care of service members and their families."

According to Unger, his path toward his final assignment was fitting, as he himself has lost a son to combat when an Improvised Explosive Device detonated near his vehicle in Iraq.

"Twelve years ago I lost my beloved son, Cpl. David M. Unger, who gave us all the ultimate sacrifice for our nation, and for all of us here today," said Unger. "So in 2006 I picked up his rucksack to continue his legacy until mission complete. Well son, I'm honored to say we made it.

"Today, I celebrate life, as I reflect on everything that has led me to this moment," said Unger. "I fully understand the reason why our organization (WTB) requires the best NCOs, officers and civilians to care for our wounded, injured and ill Soldiers. Together through leadership and mentorship, we will continue to pick up our fellow Soldiers and lead them through their transitions filled with pride, dignity and most of all, respect."