ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. (April 9, 2018) - The U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, or CERDEC, recently welcomed its newest Senior Enlisted Advisor, or SEA, Sgt. 1st Class David M. Worthington.Worthington, who hails from Richardson, Texas, transitioned from his previous duties as an enlisted advisor with CERDEC's Space and Terrestrial Communications Directorate to CERDEC's SEA following Sgt. 1st Class Clifford T. Martin II's retirement on March 29.The message he brings is simple: Be humble. Stay hungry. Keep moving forward."I love being a Soldier," explained Worthington, who joined the Army in 2000 and has continued serving through nine combat deployments. "I've stayed in because I didn't want to pass this conflict on to my children. Since that's inevitable now, all I can do is prepare my children to fight that fight when, or if, their time comes."When he was looking at his next assignment options, Worthington wanted to find something that would push him out of his comfort zone. He selected the job opportunity at CERDEC because of the career-broadening possibilities."I intentionally stepped away from doing something I really love to give back to the Army by lending my experience to the scientists and technicians who are working to equip future Soldiers," Worthington said.CERDEC is the Army's applied research and advanced technology development center for command, control, communications, computers, cyber, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance - or C5ISR - capabilities that support Army Modernization priorities and enable tactical overmatch for the joint warfighter."I wanted to do something that would keep me involved and further sharpen my technical and tactical disciplines, but I also wanted to have an impact on the Army's future," recalled Worthington. "When the opportunity came along to work at CERDEC, it seemed like a good fit all around."Since his arrival at Aberdeen Proving Ground in April 2017, Worthington has visited labs to talk with scientists and engineers. Due to his broad operational background, he understands how most of the technologies should work in order to benefit the future Soldier."I've been involved in many discussions as a person at the table providing input as opposed to providing feedback on whatever technology is being discussed," Worthington said. "I don't have the highest level of education -- especially considering CERDEC's median degree level -- but my biggest strength is helping translate Army requirements to engineers, and breaking down engineering talk into the 'So what' for the Warfighter."Worthington hopes to one day finish his career as a Signal Company First Sergeant with the direct responsibility for influencing Soldiers; however, he is enjoying his current assignment of being "the tech guy" because it comes with its own set of rewarding experiences."My work at CERDEC also allows me to reach down to the individual Soldiers but to ensure that they're taken care of in a completely different forum -- being equipped on the battlefield," he said.