With billions in contracting dollars going to small businesses for both products and services, there's no question that small companies are big business for the Army. That's why the January -- March issue of Army AL&T magazine is dedicated to small business, online now.

Tommy Marks, director of the Army Office of Small Business Programs, has been in his job for less than a year, but he's no stranger to the Army or to acquisition, having retired as a lieutenant colonel after 24 years of active duty service. Now he's employing the expertise he gained to help the Army find the most innovative technology and the best services, and help build and sustain the Army's industrial base from the ground up. Read It's all in the delivery.

From the other side of the small business fence come the voices of entrepreneurs--many if not most former military personnel--who discuss the benefits and difficulties of doing business with the Army. From tackling requests for proposals to the many Catch-22s they face, to the ultimate return on investment--helping the warfighter. Read "An Honor and a Challenge" in Critical Thinking.

The January -- March issue also marks the last column from the current Army acquisition executive, the Hon. Heidi Shyu, as she steps down. Gabe Camarillo, her principal deputy, contributes a heartfelt tribute to his boss, her sense of humor and her practical-minded approach to Army acquisition.

The new issue also has more than small business, including "The Future of Wearable Tech." Real-time physiological status monitoring advances are enabling the science and technology community to fine-tune Soldier performance--and preventing heat casualties and overwork.

The January -- March edition is available online to be read or downloaded, and the app version is available on the Apple iOS App Store and on Google Play.

To subscribe to Army AL&T magazine, go to http://usaasc.armyalt.com/?iid=128417#folio=2 and click on the red "Subscribe" box in the upper right corner. Enter your mailing address if you'd like to receive printed copies.