SAN ANTONIO (September 21, 2015) -- The U.S. Army Installation Management Command, as a part of their commitment to developing a more agile and adaptive workforce, is restructuring its internal educational system. A big step forward in the transformation is renaming the command's existing educational institution to the College of Installation Management.The college will be comprised of three schools: the School of Installation Management, the School for Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, and the School for Service Culture."Our goal is to build a premier educational institution," said Lt. Gen. David D. Halverson, commanding general for IMCOM."The College of Installation Management will further the Army's commitment to cutting-edge adult education described in the Army Learning Model."The college will nest itself within the Army University system and become the single source provider for military and civilian education programs related to installation management disciplines and Department of Defense Expeditionary Base Operations Support."The defining challenge of the 21st century is developing our human capital," said Robert Kiser, the IMCOM G7 Training director who serves as the college dean. "It is our job to develop the next generation of leaders for IMCOM."Courses offered in these schools are for appropriated and non-appropriated fund IMCOM employees. Military employees outside of IMCOM may enroll in select classes on a space-available basis at http://www.imcomacademy.com."This college is more than a brick and mortar institution," said Kiser.Since military installations are worldwide, Kiser explained, the college provides an array of residential and online courses which meet the needs of a geographically-dispersed workforce and minimize travel costs. IMCOM employees worldwide can take these courses in the convenience of their office or at home.Kimberly Williams, a program analyst in the Family and MWR office at U.S. Garrison Daegu, began taking courses in the School of Family and MWR when she was a management trainee. She started her MWR career in marketing and later transitioned to working in other areas such as business operations and community recreation."The Army Family and MWR Financial Planning course helped me tremendously in my new role as a program analyst," she said. "My marketing experience gave me transferable skills like trend analysis; however, my new job requires me to dive deeper into our program data."For employees like Williams, easy accessibility to the college's website makes it possible for graduates-- even after taking the courses-- to revisit the class modules and apply the content into their current duties."On any given day, I am in my office reviewing standard management information reports for finance and simultaneously clicking through the financial planning course," she added. "Though the course was informative when I initially took the training, it was not relevant to me at the time. Now, I truly appreciate the information because it is helping me in real time."According to Kiser, most online courses are currently in the School of Family and MWR, but the other schools will offer online courses in the future.Residential courses will continue to be held at the Maj. Gen. Robert M. Joyce IMCOM Academy building at Joint Base San Antonio, Texas. These courses provide training in specialized areas in installation management where in-classroom training is essential.To be eligible to enroll in residential courses, students often have to complete pre-requisite online courses.Heather Pilgrim, the Army Community Service director at Baumholder, Germany, recently took the week-long Leadership and Management for ACS Directors course."I have a deep appreciation for being in this class, because I know how much it costs in the civilian world to get this type of training," she said.Pilgrim now plans to apply what she learned in the classroom toward strengthening her leadership skills."I learned how to match my leadership style to meet my team's developmental level in order to make a successful environment for them," she said.In addition to receiving an invaluable education, students can also receive continuing education units from many of the courses offered. These CEUs are evaluated by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training. Students can use CEUs towards professional licenses, certifications, and advanced education course credit. Many courses are also recommended for college credit by the American Council on Education."We want to make sure employees are getting credit from our courses," said Kiser."Our goal is to develop multiple cooperative degrees with institutions of higher learning and to ensure that IMCOM employees have the opportunity to take advantage of those degrees," he said.