First Things First

By Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public AffairsOctober 6, 2008

San Borodino Calif. native Spc. Michael Stutz, a combat medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 7th  Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division; inspects the top exterior of his newly assigned M-113 track wheeled vehicle. This vehicle among others are being assigned to the Soldiers of 1st BCT upon their arrival at the National Training Center (NTC), at Fort Irwin, Calif. Stutz says this vehicle is paramount to the training he and his fellow medics will conduct here at NTC, because of its versatility. "We can load up littered patients, seated patients, get those IVs and supply any type of care needed until we get them to a more specialized care facility, Stutz said."
1 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – San Borodino Calif. native Spc. Michael Stutz, a combat medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division; inspects the top exterior of his newly assigned M-113 track wheeled vehicle. This vehicle among others are being assigned to the Soldiers of 1st BCT upon their arrival at the National Training Center (NTC), at Fort Irwin, Calif. Stutz says this vehicle is paramount to the training he and his fellow medics will conduct here at NTC, because of its versatility. "We can load up littered patients, seated patients, get those IVs and supply any type of care needed until we get them to a more specialized care facility, Stutz said." (Photo Credit: U.S. Army) VIEW ORIGINAL
Atlanta Ga. Native Pvt. Daryl Martin, a generator mechanic (32D) with A Company 1st Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division inspects the under riggings of his gun truck for signs of a leak or rusted conditions to ensure vehicle operability during 1BCT's training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4.
2 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Atlanta Ga. Native Pvt. Daryl Martin, a generator mechanic (32D) with A Company 1st Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division inspects the under riggings of his gun truck for signs of a leak or rusted conditions to ensure vehicle operability during 1BCT's training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Two Soldiers from the A Co. 115th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry division, inspect the wiring and hoses of their issued vehicle at the National Training Center Oct. 4 on Fort Irwin, Calif.
3 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Two Soldiers from the A Co. 115th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry division, inspect the wiring and hoses of their issued vehicle at the National Training Center Oct. 4 on Fort Irwin, Calif. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Spc. Mitchell Alphonso Page, Mechanic (63C), Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 115th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, who is a native of Portsmouth, Va., Inspects the 'Troop Seats' on an LMTV for serviceability during the 1st Brigade Combat Team's vehicle draw Oct. 4 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif.
4 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Spc. Mitchell Alphonso Page, Mechanic (63C), Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 115th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, who is a native of Portsmouth, Va., Inspects the 'Troop Seats' on an LMTV for serviceability during the 1st Brigade Combat Team's vehicle draw Oct. 4 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Lincoln Neb. native Spc. Steven L. Blackleter, medic, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 7th  Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division inspects the drivers hatch on his team's M-113 Track wheeled vehicle During a 'vehicle drawing' at the National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, Calif.
5 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Lincoln Neb. native Spc. Steven L. Blackleter, medic, Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division inspects the drivers hatch on his team's M-113 Track wheeled vehicle During a 'vehicle drawing' at the National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, Calif. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
San Diego native Pfc. Jared Smith, forward observer, conducts Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services for his humvee assigned during a vehicle draw Oct. 4 at the National Training Center (NTC) on Fort Irwin, Calif. The checks these "Ironhorse" Soldiers will conduct over the next two days are necessary to make sure these vehicles are operable to assist in the training here at NTC.
6 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – San Diego native Pfc. Jared Smith, forward observer, conducts Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services for his humvee assigned during a vehicle draw Oct. 4 at the National Training Center (NTC) on Fort Irwin, Calif. The checks these "Ironhorse" Soldiers will conduct over the next two days are necessary to make sure these vehicles are operable to assist in the training here at NTC. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Victorville Calif. Native John R. Rhodes, an electronic technician, tests the operation of the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear attached to all the vehicles within the National Training Center here at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. MILES Gear is very similar to a game of 'laser tag' as a beckon signal is sent to a receiver letting the occupants of the vehicle know that they have been hit by enemy fire.
7 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Victorville Calif. Native John R. Rhodes, an electronic technician, tests the operation of the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear attached to all the vehicles within the National Training Center here at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. MILES Gear is very similar to a game of 'laser tag' as a beckon signal is sent to a receiver letting the occupants of the vehicle know that they have been hit by enemy fire. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Victorville Calif. Native John R. Rhodes, an electronic technician, tests the operation of the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear attached to all the vehicles within the National Training Center here at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. MILES Gear is very similar to a game of 'laser tag' as a beckon signal is sent to a receiver letting the occupants of the vehicle know that they have been hit by enemy fire.
8 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Victorville Calif. Native John R. Rhodes, an electronic technician, tests the operation of the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear attached to all the vehicles within the National Training Center here at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. MILES Gear is very similar to a game of 'laser tag' as a beckon signal is sent to a receiver letting the occupants of the vehicle know that they have been hit by enemy fire. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL
Victorville Calif. Native John R. Rhodes, an electronic technician, tests the operation of the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear attached to all the vehicles within the National Training Center here at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. MILES Gear is very similar to a game of 'laser tag' as a beckon signal is sent to a receiver letting the occupants of the vehicle know that they have been hit by enemy fire.
9 / 9 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Victorville Calif. Native John R. Rhodes, an electronic technician, tests the operation of the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES) gear attached to all the vehicles within the National Training Center here at Fort Irwin, Calif. Oct. 4. MILES Gear is very similar to a game of 'laser tag' as a beckon signal is sent to a receiver letting the occupants of the vehicle know that they have been hit by enemy fire. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Phillip Adam Turner, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs) VIEW ORIGINAL