U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Task Force Pacesetter responds to Hurricane Ike in Texas

By Robert HaynesSeptember 28, 2008

Jason Gramlich of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Little Rock District takes an application for a Blue Roof from a Hurricane Ike victim in Webster, Texas. The Corps of Engineers manages Operation Blue Roof for FEMA after disasters like Ike. It provides temporary repairs to hurricane-damaged roofs until homeowners can have permanent repairs made.
1 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Jason Gramlich of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Little Rock District takes an application for a Blue Roof from a Hurricane Ike victim in Webster, Texas. The Corps of Engineers manages Operation Blue Roof for FEMA after disasters like Ike. It provides temporary repairs to hurricane-damaged roofs until homeowners can have permanent repairs made. (Photo Credit: Robert Haynes) VIEW ORIGINAL
Jason Gramlich of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Little Rock District takes an application for a Blue Roof from a Hurricane Ike victim in Webster, Texas. The Corps of Engineers manages Operation Blue Roof for FEMA after disasters like Ike. It provides temporary repairs to hurricane-damaged roofs until homeowners can have permanent repairs made.
2 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Jason Gramlich of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Little Rock District takes an application for a Blue Roof from a Hurricane Ike victim in Webster, Texas. The Corps of Engineers manages Operation Blue Roof for FEMA after disasters like Ike. It provides temporary repairs to hurricane-damaged roofs until homeowners can have permanent repairs made. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) VIEW ORIGINAL
Hurricane Ike left devastating scenes in communities throughout the Gulf Coast of Texas, like _______ pictured above. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stood up Task Force Pacesetter for its many response and recovery operations throughout the impacted region.
3 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Hurricane Ike left devastating scenes in communities throughout the Gulf Coast of Texas, like _______ pictured above. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stood up Task Force Pacesetter for its many response and recovery operations throughout the impacted region. (Photo Credit: Robert Haynes) VIEW ORIGINAL
Hurricane Ike left devastating scenes in communities throughout the Gulf Coast of Texas, like _______ pictured above. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stood up Task Force Pacesetter for its many response and recovery operations throughout the impacted region.
4 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Hurricane Ike left devastating scenes in communities throughout the Gulf Coast of Texas, like _______ pictured above. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers stood up Task Force Pacesetter for its many response and recovery operations throughout the impacted region. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) VIEW ORIGINAL
Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Southwest Division commander, comforts a victim of Hurricane Ike in Galveston, Texas. Cox heads the Corps' Hurricane Ike response and recovery mission - Task Force Pacesetter. The task force is made up of approximately 400 Corps employees from around the world responding to the needs of Hurricane Ike victims throughout southeast Texas as part of the federal government's unified national response.
5 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Southwest Division commander, comforts a victim of Hurricane Ike in Galveston, Texas. Cox heads the Corps' Hurricane Ike response and recovery mission - Task Force Pacesetter. The task force is made up of approximately 400 Corps employees from around the world responding to the needs of Hurricane Ike victims throughout southeast Texas as part of the federal government's unified national response. (Photo Credit: Robert Haynes) VIEW ORIGINAL
Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Southwest Division commander, comforts a victim of Hurricane Ike in Galveston, Texas. Cox heads the Corps' Hurricane Ike response and recovery mission - Task Force Pacesetter. The task force is made up of approximately 400 Corps employees from around the world responding to the needs of Hurricane Ike victims throughout southeast Texas as part of the federal government's unified national response.
6 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Southwest Division commander, comforts a victim of Hurricane Ike in Galveston, Texas. Cox heads the Corps' Hurricane Ike response and recovery mission - Task Force Pacesetter. The task force is made up of approximately 400 Corps employees from around the world responding to the needs of Hurricane Ike victims throughout southeast Texas as part of the federal government's unified national response. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) VIEW ORIGINAL
Hurricane Ike struck hard on both land and sea when it hit Texas in September 2008. Here, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers pulls debris out of Port Galveston that could be hazardous to vessels attempting to use the port. After a disaster like Ike, the Corps has lead responsibility for conducting and reporting channel condition surveys, removing sunken vessels and debris in the channels and performing maintenance dredging.
7 / 7 Show Caption + Hide Caption – Hurricane Ike struck hard on both land and sea when it hit Texas in September 2008. Here, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers pulls debris out of Port Galveston that could be hazardous to vessels attempting to use the port. After a disaster like Ike, the Corps has lead responsibility for conducting and reporting channel condition surveys, removing sunken vessels and debris in the channels and performing maintenance dredging. (Photo Credit: Robert Haynes) VIEW ORIGINAL

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