ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST

Scroll down

OVERVIEW

The Army Combat Fitness Test will better connect fitness with combat readiness for all Soldiers.

  • Improve Soldier and unit readiness

  • Transform the Army’s fitness culture

  • Reduce preventable injuries and attrition

  • Enhance mental toughness and stamina

Implementation Period

October 2018
ACFT Field Test Period Begins: Master Fitness Trainers start training at select units.

March 2019 - October 2019
Selected units will take two not-for-record ACFTs.

October 2019
Initial Implementation: Entire Army will take two not-for-record ACFTs approximately six months apart.

No later than October 2020
ACFT becomes the Army physical test of record.

Frequently Asked Questions

Background and Research

The character of war is changing as are the physical demands of combat. The APFT primarily provides an assessment of muscular and aerobic endurance. The Army has determined that for Soldiers to be ready for the rigors of operations in a complex environment, they must possess significant physical capacity in the following components of fitness: muscular strength, muscular endurance, power, speed, agility, cardio endurance, balance, flexibility, coordination and reaction time. Based on our analysis, the ACFT events most strongly correlate with combat readiness. The APFT is assessed to have 40 percent predictive power for combat performance; the ACFT is assessed to have 80 percent predictive power.

Fundamental to Army readiness is the readiness of our Soldiers. While there are multiple components to individual readiness, physical fitness is essential for all Soldiers. The ACFT is specifically designed to assess Soldier physical fitness as it applies to combat, hence the name change to reflect the combat-centric nature of the test.

All Soldiers must be capable to deploy and fight. From the Army Vision: “The Army Mission – our purpose – remains constant: To deploy, fight, and win our nation's wars by providing ready, prompt, and sustain land dominance by Army forces.” To accomplish that mission, the Army will “build readiness for high intensity conflict” with training that “will be tough, realistic, iterative and battled-focused.” The battlefields of today and tomorrow are increasingly complex, fluid, and uncertain; they demand that all Soldiers are physically fit and ready for full-spectrum operations.

In the Baseline Soldier Physical Readiness Requirements Study, the Army researched the baseline physical-readiness requirements of high-physical demand tasks Soldiers perform in combat. In addition to our own studies, we met with military fitness leaders from the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, Netherlands and many other fitness experts from civilian universities and centers to discuss U.S. Army Soldier fitness. We also consulted with the Department of Physical Education, U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, the U.S. Army Public Health Center and the Army Physical Fitness School.

The primary effort in the development of the ACFT was the Baseline Soldier Physical Readiness Requirements and Physical Demands Study. Based upon the results of this study, we identified 10 components of physical fitness and the contribution of each component to success on the battlefield. We subsequently identified the most effective fitness test events to assess those components of combat fitness.

Yes. We looked at the Marine Corps’ Physical Fitness Test, Combat Fitness Test, and the Air Force Tactical Air Control Party Operators Test, as well as physical performance assessments from 10-15 other sports programs, government agencies and allied nations' militaries.

Test Administration

Like the APFT, the ACFT uniform is the Army Physical Fitness Uniform (APFU).

The average testing time per Soldier is about 50 minutes. The ACFT can be scaled to groups of Soldiers ranging from one to 120 per testing session depending on the number of lanes (equipment) and graders. A Company of 120 Soldiers could be tested in a little over two hours using 16 lanes of equipment.

That is a policy question and remains to be determined through the field tests, but we believe the ACFT will likely follow the same administrative requirements of the current APFT – twice per year about every six months.

Grading

During the field testing, the Army will assess Soldiers' ACFT performance by both MOS and unit type. The specific grading approach and standards will be decided by Army senior leaders based on data collected from the field test. There will be a minimum baseline standard that aligns with the general physical fitness required for a Soldier to perform high-physical-demand common Soldier tasks. Field testing will allow the Army to determine whether to administer the test based on unit occupational physical demands or by a Soldier's military occupational specialty. Field test standards will be tiered by “heavy” (black), “significant” (grey) and “moderate” (gold) physical demands. Through the field test and going forward, the focus remains on increasing readiness by training and assessing the physical capacity of Soldiers to perform common warfighting tasks. See the scoring scales for the field test period.

Performing well on the ACFT is a key indicator of a Soldier's ability to meet the physical demands faced in combat.

The Army is a standards-based institution and those standards are grounded in the requirements of combat operations. The rigors of ground combat are unforgiving and do not discriminate between men or women; therefore, our physical fitness test and standards reflect that reality. The ACFT is a product of a scientifically validated study, which identified field-expedient physical fitness events that were most predictive of performance on high physical demand common Soldier tasks, regardless of gender. While there are physiological differences between men and women, our focus remains on increasing the fitness and readiness of all Soldiers through training, and assessing the physical capacity of Soldiers to fully perform common warfighting tasks.

The Occupational Physical Assessment Test (OPAT) remains for future Soldiers as do a few specialized tests for certain schools such as divers, rangers, and cadets at the U.S. Military Academy. The ACFT will be a “test of record.” The other tests are entrance or unit tests and are not tests of record.

The ACFT was approved and will be the Army fitness test of record no later than October 2020. In conjunction with the Center for Initial Military Training, the U.S. Army Research Institute for Environmental Medicine is working on potential alternate events that once determined, will be evaluated by Army leaders for decision. Alternate events will be worked out during the Field Test period over the next year and will be communicated to the Army before full implementation.

Many Soldiers who are on profile will be able to take the six-event ACFT. Soldiers with temporary profiles will still be able to train for and practice the test events that are not limited by their profiles. As is the case now, they will be allowed to rehabilitate and recondition from the profile before testing. The current policy concerning profiles will remain in place unless Army senior leaders decide on changes.

Passing or failing an Army test of record has implications. Going forward, based on the field test data, the Army will set policy regarding ACFT performance.

Equipment

The required equipment to conduct the ACFT include deadlift hex bars with weights and collars, nylon drag sleds with straps and plates (each weighted with two 45-pound plates), 10-pound medicine balls, 40-pound kettle bells and a location to do leg tucks and run. See the full equipment list.

Yes, all Army components have until Oct. 1, 2019, to purchase the required equipment with Operations and Maintenance, Army funds.

The cost per lane of equipment is about $2,000. While this cost may seem considerable, considering the lifespan of the equipment and number of Soldiers testing on the equipment, the cost is minimal, only several dollars per Soldier per year. In the long run, this test will save money and enhance readiness.

Yes, all Army components have sufficient time to procure the required equipment with Operations and Maintenance, Army funds no later than Oct. 1, 2019.

Current policy does not, and has never, required PT tests while deployed. We do not expect this to change in the future. Soldiers in other locations will have options as to when and where they test. Testing equipment will be widely available.

  • Simple to set up and easier to learn than the barbell or Olympic bar deadlift.
  • Reduces loading (shear forces) on the lumbar spine.
  • Less chance of getting pulled forward creating excessive spinal flexion.
  • No hyperextension at lockout.
  • No need for a mixed grip.
  • D-handles may be used for people with insufficient hip range of motion.
  • Allows Soldier to safely lift heavier loads.
  • Enhanced posterior activation and patterning.
  • Increased muscular hypertrophy applicable to most athletic movements.

General Concerns

Yes, TRADOC is working closely with partners both in the Army National Guard and the U.S. Army Reserve Command to determine the right locations for field testing, equipment fielding and the overall training strategy to support the improved test and improve unit fitness levels. There are seven National Guard battalions, seven Army Reserve units, one recruiting battalion and one and one ROTC battalion that were specifically chosen for the field test in order to evaluate and solve minor logistics challenges involved with remote locations. Additionally, training programs and equipping strategies are being developed in close coordination with all components. It is also important to understand that the Army has several remote locations across all components to include more than 1,500 recruiting stations, overseas assignments, Reserve and National Guard unit locations, fellowships and training assignments that take Soldiers far from normal military base support.

The Active Army needs to grow above 500,000 Soldiers with associated growth in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve to meet the threats and challenges of today and anticipated ones of tomorrow. Additionally, all Soldiers must be high-quality, physically fit, mentally tough and able to deploy, fight, and win decisively on any future battlefield. The ACFT promises to improve the quality and performance of our Soldiers. The Army will not sacrifice the quality of our Soldiers to achieve quantity. And over time, this should help reduce attrition rates which helps grow end strength.

Safety

It is not expected that Soldiers, properly supervised and trained by their leadership, will have any unusual risk of injury training for the ACFT. Injuries are possible with any training, to include training for the current APFT. However, new training resources such as the revised FM 7-22 (Holistic Health and Fitness) and ACFT Training Guide will be available to all units so they can minimize the chance for injury and successfully prepare Soldiers for the ACFT.

The Army has published the ACFT Training Guide with exercises, drills and sample training aids that will help develop strength, endurance and mobility using common strength training methods found in current Army doctrine (FM 7-22). Additionally, the Center for Army Lessons Learned has published an AFCT handbook which discusses the six events, testing procedures, and a training guide. The exercises can be done anywhere and with equipment that is not resource-intensive. Soldiers can also reference the Army’s ACFT microsite at www.army.mil/acft. Additional guidance can be found in the current FM 7-22 and from your master fitness trainers.

ACFT Events

Conventional wisdom with regards to strength lifts is that reduced load plus increased repetitions plus proper rest equals reduced injuries. A 3 repetition maximum deadlift will produce fewer injuries than a 1 repetition maximum deadlift since Soldiers are lifting at a lower load. Trap bars are significantly easier for untrained Soldiers to learn and execute lifts properly. Trap bars put the Soldier in a more controlled biomechanical posture to promote adherence to precision during the lift. The trap bar lift exerts less spinal loading due to an upright torso than the regular deadlift. To date, we’ve tested more than 500 untrained Soldiers with zero reported injuries. Improvements in grip, core and lower body strength will significantly improve combat performance while reducing load-carriage injuries.

Soldiers execute a myriad of complex movements as part of warfighter tasks. While these movements require a baseline of strength, power, speed and endurance, the movements also require a relatively high degree of body coordination, dynamic balance and agility. Assessment of these dimensions of fitness at high intensity is important to overall movement lethality. The Standing Power Throw is highly predictive of combat performance.

The current 2-minute APFT push-up is very challenging to grade. Changes in body and hand position also create various levels of workload per repetition. The 2-minute APFT push-up also encourages Soldiers to execute higher numbers of repetitions as rapidly as possible. The un-supported or Hand Release Push-up is designed to increase the force required for each repetition, therefore increasing upper body push strength with fewer repetitions. The Hand Release Push-up is also significantly easier to grade with a specified hand placement and resting only in the front leaning rest position. The HR Push-up has great functional application to many warfighter tasks like getting up quickly for a three-to-five second rush, holding off combatants and moving obstacles out of the way.

This event is simple and easy to learn, and mimics many warfighter skills and tasks. It is also an excellent measure of anaerobic power and endurance. We’ve tested over 500 Soldiers with an average preparation/training time of 10 minutes. Every Soldier was capable of executing the S-D-C to standard with no issues. It is similar to shuttle-type training exercises that have been part of Army doctrine for several decades.

First, the Leg Tuck has been a part of Army doctrine (FM 7-22) for more than 10 years. Second, the Leg Tuck is highly correlated with the pull-up, but with significantly greater operational specificity. Under load, few if any Soldiers can execute a pull-up; however with training, Soldiers under load can ‘hook a heel’ to get out/up/over an obstacle. Lastly, while there are a myriad of core strength exercises – heel claps, heel taps, leg tuck, ankles to the bar, etc. – we chose the Leg Tuck for its simplicity of form and objectivity of grading. Although there is a maximum 2-minute time limit, most Soldiers will achieve muscle burn out before this time limit. Improvements in core and upper body strength (specifically the muscles on the back of the body – the posterior chain) will significantly improve combat performance while reducing load carriage injuries.

The simplest and most effective way to measure aerobic endurance with large groups of Soldiers is with a distance run. We measure and train aerobic endurance to allow Soldiers to safely and effectively conduct occupationally-specific training and task performance to include moving long distances under load.

The ACFT Training Guide recommends sprint intervals (30:60 seconds, 60:120 seconds), release run, hill repeats and 10 sprint intervals (60:120 seconds). Additional guidance can be found in FM 7-22 and from your master fitness trainers.

ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST EVENTS

  • 3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)

    The 3 Repetition Maximum Deadlift (MDL) event represents movements required to safely and effectively lift heavy loads from the ground, jump, bound and tolerate landing. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid upper and lower back injuries caused by moving long distances under heavy load.

    5 MINUTES

    Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times.

    The 3 Repetition Maximum Deadlift (MDL) event represents movements required to safely and effectively lift heavy loads from the ground, jump, bound and tolerate landing. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid upper and lower back injuries caused by moving long distances under heavy load.

    Starting Position
    The Soldier will step inside the hexagon/trap bar, feet generally shoulder width apart, and locate the midpoint of the hexagon/trap bar handles.

    Phase 1 Preparatory Phase
    On the command of “GET SET,” the Soldier will bend at the knees and hips, reach down and grasp the center of the handles (“D-handle” hexagon/traps bars are not authorized; as an exception, if a dual-handled hexagon/trap bar is used, the Soldier will grasp the lower handles, with the D-handles facing down). Arms should be fully extended, back flat, head in line with the spinal column or slightly extended, head and eyes to the front or slightly upward, and heels in contact with the ground. All repetitions will begin from this position.

    Phase 2 Upward Movement Phase
    On the command of “GO,” the Soldier will stand up and lift the bar by extending the hips and knees. Hips should never rise before or above the shoulders. The back should remain straight – not flexed or extended. The Soldier will continue to extend the hips and knees until reaching an upright stance. There is a slight pause at the top of this movement.

    Phase 3 Downward Movement Phase
    By flexing the hips and the knees slowly, the Soldier lowers the bar to the ground under control while maintaining a flat-back position. Do not drop or let go of the bar. The hexagon/trap bar weight plates must touch the ground before beginning the next repetition. Weight plates may not bounce on the ground.

    Execute three continuous repetitions with the same weight. If the Soldier fails to complete three continuous repetitions under control, he or she is permitted one retest at a lower weight after a rest of up to two minutes. If the Soldier successfully completes three continuous repetitions on the first attempt, he or she may elect an additional attempt at a higher weight after a rest of up to two minutes. The maximum number of attempts on the MDL is two.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength, balance and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    60-pound trap bar and plates

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 140 pounds and 340 pounds

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Sumo Deadlift

    • Alternate Staggered Squat Jump

    • Forward Lunge

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Lifting and moving heavy loads from the ground (personnel and equipment)
    • Extracting a casualty on a litter
  • STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)

    The Standing Power Throw (SPT) event represents tasks requiring quick explosive movements to maneuver equipment and personnel.

    3 MINUTES

    Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

    The Standing Power Throw (SPT) event represents tasks requiring quick explosive movements to maneuver equipment and personnel.

    Starting Position
    The Soldiers will face away from the start line, grasp the medicine ball (10 pounds) with both hands at hip level and stand with both heels at (but not on or over) the start line. Grasp the ball firmly and as far around the sides of the ball as possible. Towels or rags will be provided to remove excess moisture/debris from the medicine ball.

    Practice Throw
    Throw 1 is a practice throw to allow Soldiers to warm-up and the lane grader to move to an approximate landing point. Throw one is not measured or recorded.

    As directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane one executes throw one (practice throw). Soldiers are permitted several preparatory movements flexing at the trunk, knees, and hips while lowering the ball between their legs. When directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane two executes throw one (practice throw).

    Record Throws
    Soldiers in lanes one and two alternately execute throws two and three (the two record throws). Soldiers are still permitted the preparatory movements. Once the Soldiers complete three throws, they will move onto the SPT lane to retrieve the medicine balls for the next Soldiers, and then return to the back of the line.

    Although the second and third throws are recorded, only the longer of the two will count as the raw score. The start line grader will circle the longer attempt.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Explosive power, balance, and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    10-pound medicine ball

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: Four and 13 meters

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Power Jump

    • Overhead Push Press

    • Tuck Jump

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Throwing equipment onto or over an obstacle
    • Lifting Soldiers up; assisting a buddy to climb up a wall
    • Jumping across and over obstacles
    • Employing progressive levels of force in man-to-man contact
  • HAND-RELEASE PUSH-UP (HRP)

    This is an upper body endurance test that represents repetitive and sustained pushing used in combat tasks.

    2 MINUTES

    Complete as many hand-release push-ups as possible in two minutes

    This is an upper body endurance test that represents repetitive and sustained pushing used in combat tasks.

    Starting position
    On the command of “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position facing the start line with hands flat on the ground and index fingers inside the outer edges of the shoulders. The chest and front of the hips and thighs will be on the ground. Toes will touch the ground with feet together or up to a boot’s width apart. The ankles will be flexed. The head does not have to be on the ground. Feet will remain generally together, no more than a boot’s width apart, throughout the HRP. Soldiers may adjust their feet during the test event as long as they do not lift a foot off the ground.

    Movement 1
    On the command “GO,” a Soldier will push their whole body up from the ground as a single unit to the up position by fully extending the elbows (front leaning rest).

    • The Soldier will maintain a generally straight body alignment from the top of the head to the ankles. This generally straight position will be maintained for the duration of the HRP.
    • Failing to maintain a generally straight alignment during a repetition will cause that repetition to not count.
    • The front leaning rest is the only authorized rest position. Bending or flexing the knees, hips, trunk, or neck while in the rest position is not authorized.

    Movement 2
    After the elbows are fully extended and the Soldier has reached the up position, the Soldier will bend their elbows to lower the body back to the ground. The chest, hips and thighs should touch down at the same time. The head or face do not have to contact the ground.

    Movement 3a
    Arm Extension HRP – without moving the head, body, or legs, the Soldier will extend both hands out from the body until the arms are fully extended forming a 90-degree angle between the arms and trunk at the shoulders. Hands may be on or off the ground. After reaching this position, the elbows bend to move the hands back under the shoulder.

    Movement 3b
    Hand Lift HRP – without moving the head, body, or legs, the Soldier will lift both hands from the ground at the same time. A clear gap between the palms and the ground must be visible to the grader to ensure Soldiers have released their hands from the ground. The hands are then lowered until they are flat on the ground back under the shoulder.

    Movement 4
    Regardless of the HRP protocol, Soldiers must ensure their hands are flat on the ground with the index fingers inside the outer edges of the shoulders (returning to the starting position). This completes one repetition.

    The Soldier must make a continuous effort to push up and cannot rest on the ground.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Kettlebells

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 10 and 70 repetitions

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Supine Chest Press

    • 8-count T Push-up

    • Incline Bench

    • Quadraplex

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Moving obstacles
    • Pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact
    • Pushing a disabled vehicle
    • Getting to and from the ground during evasion and maneuver
    • Reaching out from the prone position when shooting, taking cover, or low crawling
  • SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)

    The Sprint-Drag-Carry (SDC) is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

    4 MINUTES

    Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint

    The Sprint-Drag-Carry (SDC) is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

    Starting position
    On the command “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position with the top of the head behind the start line. The grader is positioned to see both the start line and the 25m line. The grader can position a Soldier/battle buddy on the 25m line to ensure compliance with test event standards.

    Sprint
    On the command “GO,” Soldiers stand and sprint 25m; touch the 25m line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    Drag
    Soldiers will grasp each strap handle, which will be positioned and resting on the sled behind the start line; pull the sled backwards until the entire sled crosses the 25m line; turn the sled around and pull back until the entire sled crosses the start line. If the entire sled does not cross the 25m or start line, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    Lateral
    After the entire sled crosses the start line, the Soldier will perform a lateral for 25m, touch the 25m turn line with foot and hand, and perform the lateral back to the start line. The Soldier will face the same direction moving back to the 25m start line and returning to the start line so they lead with each foot. Feet may shuffle and touch, but should not cross. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back. Graders will correct Soldiers if they cross their feet.

    Carry
    Soldiers will grasp the handles of the two 40-pound kettlebells and run to the 25m turn line; step on or over the 25m turn line with one foot; turn and run back to the start line. If the Soldier drops the kettlebells during movement, the carry will resume from the point the kettlebells were dropped. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with their foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    Sprint
    After stepping on/over the start line, Soldiers will place the kettlebells on the ground; turn and sprint 25m; touch the 25m turn line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    The time is stopped when the Soldier crosses the start line after the final sprint (250 meters). The “penalty” for incorrect form or action is to return to the line and redo the action correctly.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Agility, anaerobic endurance, muscular endurance and muscular strength

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    2x40-pound kettlebells and 90-pound sled

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 3:35 and 1:40 minutes

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Straight Leg Deadlift

    • Bent Over Row

    • 300M Shuttle Run

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Reacting quickly to direct and indirect fire
    • Building a hasty fighting position
    • Extracting a casualty from a vehicle and carry them to safety
    • Carrying ammunition to a fighting position or vehicle
  • LEG TUCK (LTK)

    The Leg Tuck (LTK) assesses the strength of the Soldiers grip, arm, shoulder and trunk muscles. These muscles assist Soldiers in load carriage and in avoiding injuries to the back.

    2 MINUTES

    Complete as many leg tucks as possible in two minutes; maintain a relative vertical posture while moving the hips and knees up and down without excessive swinging or kipping

    The Leg Tuck (LTK) assesses the strength of the Soldiers grip, arm, shoulder and trunk muscles. These muscles assist Soldiers in load carriage and in avoiding injuries to the back.

    Starting position
    On the command “GET SET,” one Soldier from each lane will mount the bar and assume a straight-arm hang on the bar, with feet off the ground, knees bent if necessary. Graders may assist Soldiers up onto the bar. The grip is the alternating grip (recommend placing the dominant hand closest to the head). The body is perpendicular with the bar, however the alternating grip will cause the body to rotate outward slightly. The Soldier’s body must be fully extended in a straight arm position (elbows, trunk, and hips are straight). Legs and feet may not be crossed; feet must be off the ground with knees bent if necessary.

    Execution
    On the command “GO,” the Soldier will flex at the elbows, knees, hips, and waist to lift the knees. Flexing the elbows assists with this movement. The right and left knees or thighs must touch the right and left elbows, respectively. The grader must observe both knees (or thighs) in contact with both elbows for the Soldier to receive credit for the repetition.

    The Soldier will return under control to the straight-arm position, elbows straight, to complete each repetition. If the elbows remain bent, the next repetition will not count. The Soldier does not have to be completely still. Small, inconsequential, or passive movement of the body and twisting of the trunk is permitted. Deliberately swinging the trunk and legs to assist with lifting the knees is not permitted and will cause the subsequent repetition to not count.

    • Can rest in the straight-arm (down) position and may adjust grip positions by moving the hands.
    • Cannot touch the ground during grip adjustments.
    • Cannot drop from the bar before assuming the straight-arm hang position UNDER CONTROL in order for the last repetition to count.

    The event will be terminated when the Soldier voluntarily stops (drops from the bar) or when two minutes has expired.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength and endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Climbing bar

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: One and 20 reps

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Bent-Leg Raise

    • Leg Tuck and Twist

    • Alternating Grip Pull-Up

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Surmounting obstacles and walls
    • Rope climbing, descending or traversing
  • TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

    The run event measures aerobic endurance, which is required for conducting continuous operations and ground movements on foot. Higher aerobic endurance allows the body to recover quickly in preparation for executing other physically demanding tasks that may arise during a ground movement, such as reacting quickly to enemy contact.

    ≤ 21 MINUTES

    Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

    The run event measures aerobic endurance, which is required for conducting continuous operations and ground movements on foot. Higher aerobic endurance allows the body to recover quickly in preparation for executing other physically demanding tasks that may arise during a ground movement, such as reacting quickly to enemy contact.

    The two mile run can be completed on an indoor or outdoor track, or an improved surface such as a road or sidewalk. The 2MR cannot be tested on unimproved terrain. There is a programmed 5-minute rest between the LTK and the 2MR. The rest period begins when the last Soldier in the group completes the LTK. The start and finish line will be near the same location as the test site for the other five test events. Out-and-back or lap track courses are authorized.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Aerobic endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Two mile run route on level field, track or running surface

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 21:00 and 12:45 minutes

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Dismounted movement
    • Ruck march
    • Infiltration
  • EVENT 1
    3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)
    5 MINUTES

    Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times.

    The 3 Repetition Maximum Deadlift (MDL) event represents movements required to safely and effectively lift heavy loads from the ground, jump, bound and tolerate landing. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid upper and lower back injuries caused by moving long distances under heavy load.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength, balance and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    60-pound trap bar and plates

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 140 pounds and 340 pounds

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Sumo Deadlift

    • Alternate Staggered Squat Jump

    • Forward Lunge

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Lifting and moving heavy loads from the ground (personnel and equipment)
    • Extracting a casualty on a litter
  • EVENT 2
    STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)
    3 MINUTES

    Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

    The Standing Power Throw (SPT) event represents tasks requiring quick explosive movements to maneuver equipment and personnel.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Explosive power, balance, and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    10-pound medicine ball

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: Four and 13 meters

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Power Jump

    • Overhead Push Press

    • Tuck Jump

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Throwing equipment onto or over an obstacle
    • Lifting Soldiers up; assisting a buddy to climb up a wall
    • Jumping across and over obstacles
    • Employing progressive levels of force in man-to-man contact
  • EVENT 3
    HAND-RELEASE PUSH-UP (HRP)
    2 MINUTES

    Complete as many hand-release push-ups as possible in two minutes

    This is an upper body endurance test that represents repetitive and sustained pushing used in combat tasks.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Kettlebells

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 10 and 70 repetitions

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Supine Chest Press

    • 8-count T Push-up

    • Incline Bench

    • Quadraplex

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Moving obstacles
    • Pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact
    • Pushing a disabled vehicle
    • Getting to and from the ground during evasion and maneuver
    • Reaching out from the prone position when shooting, taking cover, or low crawling
  • EVENT 4
    SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)
    4 MINUTES

    Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint

    The Sprint-Drag-Carry (SDC) is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Agility, anaerobic endurance, muscular endurance and muscular strength

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    2x40-pound kettlebells and 90-pound sled

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 3:35 and 1:40 minutes

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Straight Leg Deadlift

    • Bent Over Row

    • 300M Shuttle Run

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Reacting quickly to direct and indirect fire
    • Building a hasty fighting position
    • Extracting a casualty from a vehicle and carry them to safety
    • Carrying ammunition to a fighting position or vehicle
  • EVENT 5
    LEG TUCK (LTK)
    2 MINUTES

    Complete as many leg tucks as possible in two minutes; maintain a relative vertical posture while moving the hips and knees up and down without excessive swinging or kipping

    The Leg Tuck (LTK) assesses the strength of the Soldiers grip, arm, shoulder and trunk muscles. These muscles assist Soldiers in load carriage and in avoiding injuries to the back.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength and endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Climbing bar

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: One and 20 reps

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Bent-Leg Raise

    • Leg Tuck and Twist

    • Alternating Grip Pull-Up

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Surmounting obstacles and walls
    • Rope climbing, descending or traversing
  • EVENT 6
    TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)
    ≤ 21 MINUTES

    Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

    The run event measures aerobic endurance, which is required for conducting continuous operations and ground movements on foot. Higher aerobic endurance allows the body to recover quickly in preparation for executing other physically demanding tasks that may arise during a ground movement, such as reacting quickly to enemy contact.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Aerobic endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Two mile run route on level field, track or running surface

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 21:00 and 12:45 minutes

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Dismounted movement
    • Ruck march
    • Infiltration

RESOURCES

Any comments or recommendations for improvement should be prepared using DA Form 2028 and sent to Director, Research and Analysis, United States Army Center for Initial Military Training, ATTN: ATMT-RA, 210 Dillon Circle, Fort Eustis, Virginia 23604-5701, or submit an electronic DA Form 2028 by email to: usarmy.jble.tradoc.list.g2-acft@mail.mil.