ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST

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OVERVIEW

The Army Combat Fitness Test will better connect fitness with combat readiness for all Soldiers.

  • Improve Soldier and unit readiness

  • Transform the Army’s fitness culture

  • Reduce preventable injuries and attrition

  • Enhance mental toughness and stamina

ACFT 2.0 Implementation Period

In October 2020, the ACFT becomes the Army’s PT Test. Soldiers may temporarily utilize the “plank” exercise in lieu of the Leg-Tuck to assist in transitioning to the full test.

Every year, Active Army, AGR Soldiers will take two ACFTs Reserve and Guard Soldiers will take one ACFT.

No adverse administrative actions will be taken against a Soldier for failing the ACFT and a Soldier’s score or comments on performance will not be used administratively during the data collection period.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why the ACFT & why now?

Evolution and adaptability are the cornerstones of our force. The Army Physical Fitness test served us for 40 years, and through our improved understanding of exercise science and physical training, we transition to the Army Combat Fitness Test. The ACFT will strengthen our fitness culture, reduce injuries, and increase Army readiness. The Army's physical readiness program and physical fitness test must evolve to reduce injuries and empower Soldiers abilities to perform those basic Soldier tasks on an age and gender neutral battlefield. The ACFT drives balanced and appropriate physical training that will reduce overuse injuries and unplanned attrition. As of April 2020, 58,000 Soldiers (equivalent to 13 Brigade Combat Teams (BCT's)) were non-deployable.

As military operations become more complex, it is essential that Soldiers are fit to fight and be a lethal force. All Soldiers require a balance of muscular strength, power, speed, agility, coordination, flexibility, reaction time, and aerobic capacity to be prepared to execute combat tasks. The ACFT is a predictor of a Soldier's readiness and the ability to meet the physical demands of combat.

Policy

The Army's intent is that the ACFT will not adversely or disproportionately affect any Soldier or group. No adverse administrative actions (flags, separation, denial of appointment/commissioning, derogatory/referred evaluation reports, Order of Merit List Standings, etc.) will be taken against a Soldier based on failing the ACFT until further guidance is published. Our obligation to our Soldiers is to provide them with an immersive, integrative, and comprehensive training system to ensure their success on the ACFT. The Army succeeds when our Soldiers succeed. ACFT "2.0" indicates that the Army will continue to assess and evolve the ACFT (i.e. scoring standards, alternate events). We will utilize performance data from the upcoming years to inform future modifications and updates. All Soldiers are challenged to pass ACFT 2.0 at the Gold Standard.

As Army policy develops in FY21 and beyond, the Army recognizes we have talented Soldiers with special medical concerns or permanent profiles. The Army is committed to maintaining quality Soldiers and will develop medical and personnel policies to support this commitment. Policy recommendations will be reviewed by administrative experts, medical experts, fitness experts, senior Army Commanders/Command Sergeants Major, and Army Senior Leaders. Further guidance will be published prior to FY22.

Soldier Success

Soldiers can train for the ACFT 2.0 in any environment. ACFT equipment is not required for training, and the Army has released an ACFT training guide with exercises to help Soldiers successfully prepare for the test anytime, anywhere. Download the ACFT Initial Operating Capability guide.

BCT/AIT Soldiers continue to improve their performance over time, with most Soldiers, regardless of gender, achieving passing scores on each event of the ACFT. These improvements result from appropriate physical training time and proper instruction. Two recent graduating classes of Fort Jackson BCT Soldiers had a 100% pass rate for the ACFT. Additionally, during the first 90 days of ACFT implementation in Basic Combat Training (BCT), there has been a decrease in lower body musculoskeletal injuries due to increased training for the ACFT. In a reasonable amount of time, with a comprehensive, progressive training program, Soldiers will be able to pass the ACFT at the Gold standard.

The Army will no longer conduct the APFT. The ACFT is now the Army's PT test.

Recognizing that Soldiers need time to train on the leg tuck, they may temporarily utilize the "plank" exercise in lieu of the Leg-Tuck to assist in transitioning to the full test.

The 15,000 meter stationary bike event is now a 12,000-meter stationary bike event.

In FY21, the Army challenges every Soldier to pass the ACFT at the Gold standard.

During the ACFT Field Test year, both male and female Soldiers have been able to 'max' every individual ACFT test event. The Leg Tuck, the Standing Power Throw and the 2-mile run are challenging, but important because they prevent injuries and condition Soldiers to execute critical battlefield tasks.

Leg Tuck training increases core strength and shoulder stability, which helps prevent lower back and shoulder injuries – the most common, most debilitating, and most costly injuries in the Army. Core strength is essential to overall fitness of a Soldier.

The Standing Power Throw is a measure of Soldiers' ability to generate and apply power, a critical element for success on the battlefield. Soldiers can increase their performance on this event by increasing flexibility, mobility, strength, power, and optimizing release angle.

The new run time standard is scientifically based to measure the aerobic capacity required of Soldiers. The old APFT run time standards were based on a sample of Soldier run times, and represented what Soldiers could do, as opposed to what they need to do.

The U.S. Army is approaching the ACFT in a Total Army fashion. All components are being issued equipment on the same timelines. The U.S. Army is committed to providing equivalent training opportunities to all Soldiers in all components. While recognizing the differences of each component, each command is being resourced and assisted with meeting their unique challenges. The U.S. Army is providing over $78 million worth of equipment to all three components to help them in testing the ACFT. Active duty, National Guard, and Army Reserve are developing unique solutions to training for the ACFT, using FM 7-22 as a guide, and adapting to their individual situations and resources.

Alternate Assessments

Currently, Soldiers with permanent profiles will take all ACFT events within the limits of their profile including at least one of the aerobic events. Aerobic test events include a 5,000 meter row, a 12,000 meter stationary bike, a 1,000 meter swim, and a 2 mile run. The time standard for the row, stationary bike and swim is 25 minutes and 21 minutes for the run.

The intent of the alternate assessments is to provide a rigorous assessment of total body aerobic fitness. The bike, row and swim are equivalent aerobic assessments to the 2-mile run. Aerobic fitness is a significant requirement for military fitness. The goal is for Soldiers is to rehabilitate and recover from injuries, and later take the full 6-event test.

Under the current plan, Soldiers with a permanent profile that prevents them from running will take and alternate aerobic assessment. However, a permanent profile does not limit the Soldier from taking as many of the events as their profile will allow them to take.

Special consideration will be given to unique populations who are retained with a deployment limiting code by the Disability Evaluation System (continuation on Active Duty, continuation of Active Reserve or approved retention waivers). These Soldiers will perform the ACFT 2-mile run or one of the three non-impact test events (row, bike or swim). The Army remains committed to full and fair consideration for all Soldiers in special circumstances. As Army policy develops in FY21 and beyond, the Army recognizes we have talented Soldiers with special medical concerns or permanent profiles. The Army is committed to maintaining quality Soldiers and will develop medical and personnel policies to support this commitment. Policy recommendations will be reviewed by administrative experts, medical experts, fitness experts, senior Army Commanders/Command Sergeants Major, and Army Senior Leaders. Further guidance will be published prior to FY22.

Equipment, Training, Testing and Resources

The required equipment to conduct the ACFT include deadlift hex bars with weights and collars, nylon drag sleds with straps and plates (each weighted with two 45-pound plates), 10-pound medicine balls, 40-pound kettle bells and a location to do leg tucks and run. See the full equipment list.

  • Simple to set up and easier to learn than the barbell or Olympic bar deadlift.
  • Reduces loading (shear forces) on the lumbar spine.
  • Less chance of getting pulled forward creating excessive spinal flexion.
  • No hyperextension at lockout.
  • No need for a mixed grip.
  • D-handles may be used for people with insufficient hip range of motion.
  • Allows Soldier to safely lift heavier loads.
  • Enhanced posterior activation and patterning.
  • Increased muscular hypertrophy applicable to most athletic movements.

Soldiers can train for the ACFT 2.0 in any environment. ACFT equipment is not required for training, and the Army has released an ACFT training guide with exercises to help Soldiers successfully prepare for the test anytime, anywhere. Download the ACFT Initial Operating Capability guide.

Equipment

  • The ACFT equipment distribution plan is by geographic area. It provides identical equipment, on the same timeline, to all three Army components.
  • While ACFT testing equipment is not required to train for the ACFT, any significant delays in equipment delivery could shorten practice-testing timelines in some geographic regions. To date this has not been significant.
  • The Army centrally funded and purchased $78 million of base equipment for the ACFT and is distributing to all components at no cost.
  • Units are responsible for leg-tuck bars, alternate event test equipment (Rowers/Bikes), and accessory equipment (cones, stopwatch, clipboards, etc.), if not already on-hand.

Training

  • All Compos began training for the ACFT on 1 OCT 2019 (ACFT IOC).
  • The "ACFT IOC Manual" and CALL Publication "The Army ACFT" provide units training plans and exercises, both with and without equipment to prepare for the ACFT.
  • In FY19, the Army trained 5,814 COMPO 2 and 477 COMPO 3 Soldiers (over half of the total population trained) as ACFT OIC/NCOICs or Graders.
  • In FY20, the Army has trained an additional 432 COMPO 2/3 Soldiers. There are three COMPO 2 and five COMPO 3 additional MTTs scheduled and capacity for more.

Testing

  • All Soldiers must conduct a practice test or familiarization of events before taking a record ACFT.
  • Units must provide at least 30 days between the practice test or familiarization of events and the record test to allow for progressive physical adaptation.
  • Units that are unable to administer a practice/familiarization of the ACFT in FY20 due to unusual circumstances will conduct a practice ACFT or familiarization of events no later than 1 January 2021.

  • HQDA EXORD 219-18, ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST, 13 JUL 18
  • CALL "The Army Combat Fitness Test" Manual (SEP 18 and FEB 20) describes the test events and a variety of training exercises (with and without equipment) for the ACFT.
  • ACFT Microsite: Since early 2018, the central repository for information on the ACFT is https://www.army.mil/acft
  • ACFT PRT App: Available on Android and iOS, the ACFT PRT app was developed to keep Soldiers and leaders informed on how to train for and administer the ACFT. The app is still evolving to provide the best user experience on all devices.

COVID-19

The Army is committed to the health and wellness of our Soldiers during this unprecedented time. The Army encourages Soldiers to maintain their physical fitness while balancing their health and wellness of themselves, their families and their communities. Soldiers can train for the ACFT 2.0 in any environment. ACFT equipment is not required for training, and the Army has released an ACFT training guide with exercises to help Soldiers successfully prepare for the test anytime, anywhere.

Test Administration

Every year Active duty and AGR Soldiers will take the ACFT two times and Reserve and Guard Soldiers will take it once.

Like the APFT, the ACFT uniform is the Army Physical Fitness Uniform (APFU).

The average testing time per Soldier is about 50 minutes. The ACFT can be scaled to groups of Soldiers ranging from one to 120 per testing session depending on the number of lanes (equipment) and graders. A Company of 120 Soldiers could be tested in a little over two hours using 16 lanes of equipment.

In FY21, the Army challenges every Soldier to pass the ACFT at the Gold standard. ACFT "2.0" is the Army's continuous effort to assess and evolve the ACFT (i.e. scoring standards, alternate events). We will utilize performance data from the upcoming years to inform future modifications and updates.

Safety

It is not expected that Soldiers, properly supervised and trained by their leadership, will have any unusual risk of injury training for the ACFT. Injuries are possible with any training. However, new training resources such as the ACFT Training Guide is available to all units so they can minimize the chance for injury and successfully prepare Soldiers for the ACFT. The ACFT drives balanced and appropriate physical training that will reduce overuse injuries and unplanned attrition.

ACFT Events

Conventional wisdom with regards to strength lifts is that reduced load plus increased repetitions plus proper rest equals reduced injuries. A three-repetition maximum deadlift will produce fewer injuries than a one-repetition maximum deadlift since Soldiers are lifting at a lower load. Hex bars are significantly easier for untrained Soldiers to learn and execute lifts properly. Hex bars put the Soldier in a more controlled biomechanical posture to promote adherence to precision during the lift. The hex bar lift exerts less spinal loading due to an upright torso than the regular deadlift. The Army tested more than 500 untrained Soldiers with zero reported injuries. Improvements in grip, core and lower body strength will significantly improve combat performance while reducing load-carriage injuries.

Soldiers execute a myriad of complex movements as part of warfighter tasks. While these movements require a baseline of strength, power, speed and endurance, the movements also require a relatively high degree of body coordination, dynamic balance and agility. Assessment of these dimensions of fitness at high intensity is important to overall movement lethality. The Standing Power Throw is highly predictive of combat performance.

The two-minute push-up is very challenging to grade. Changes in body and hand position also create various levels of workload per repetition. The two-minute APFT push-up encourages Soldiers to execute higher numbers of repetitions as rapidly as possible. The un-supported or Hand Release Push-up is designed to increase the force required for each repetition, therefore increasing upper body push strength with fewer repetitions. The Hand Release Push-up is also significantly easier to grade with a specified hand placement and resting only in the front leaning rest position. The HR Push-up has great functional application to many warfighter tasks like getting up quickly for a three-to-five second rush, holding off combatants and moving obstacles out of the way.

This event is simple and easy to learn, and mimics many warfighter skills and tasks. It is also an excellent measure of anaerobic power and endurance. We've tested over 500 Soldiers with an average preparation/training time of 10 minutes. Every Soldier was capable of executing the S-D-C to standard with no issues. It is similar to shuttle-type training exercises that have been part of Army doctrine for several decades.

First, the Leg Tuck has been a part of Army doctrine (FM 7-22) for more than 10 years. Second, the Leg Tuck is highly correlated with the pull-up, but with significantly greater operational specificity. Under load, few if any Soldiers can execute a pull-up; however with training, Soldiers under load can 'hook a heel' to get out/up/over an obstacle. Lastly, while there are a myriad of core strength exercises – heel claps, heel taps, leg tuck, ankles to the bar, etc. – we chose the Leg Tuck for its simplicity of form and objectivity of grading. Although there is a maximum two-minute time limit, most Soldiers will achieve muscle burn out before this time limit. Improvements in core and upper body strength (specifically the muscles on the back of the body – the posterior chain) will significantly improve combat performance while reducing load carriage injuries.

The simplest and most effective way to measure aerobic endurance with large groups of Soldiers is with a distance run. We measure and train aerobic endurance to allow Soldiers to safely and effectively conduct occupationally-specific training and task performance to include moving long distances under load.

The ACFT Training Guide recommends sprint intervals (30:60 seconds, 60:120 seconds), release run, hill repeats and 10 sprint intervals (60:120 seconds). Additional guidance can be found in FM 7-22 and from your master fitness trainers.

Grader and NCOIC/OIC Training

The levels were phased out in October 2019. If you were a Level I, you are now a ACFT Grader. If you were a Level II/III, you are now an ACFT NCOIC/OIC. You do not need to attend training again.

Yes. After you have attended training you are encouraged to conduct training at your unit to validate others to the same level you have been trained. For example, a Grader can train other Graders, and an NCOIC/OIC can train another OIC/NCOIC and Graders.

Yes. MFT is not a prerequisite for ACFT Grader and NCOIC/OIC validation.

No. This course does not meet requirements for promotion points and should not be added to an ERB.

Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F)

The Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) System is the Army’s primary investment in Soldier readiness and lethality, optimal physical and non-physical performance, reduced injury rates, improved rehabilitation after injury, and increased overall effectiveness of the Total Army. The system empowers and equips Soldiers to take charge of their health, fitness, and well-being in order to optimize individual performance, while preventing injury and disease.

DOWNLOAD: FM 7-22: Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F)

DOWNLOAD: ATP 7-22.01: H2F Testing

DOWNLOAD: ATP 7-22.01: H2F Drills and Exercises

DOWNLOAD: The H2F Operating Concept

Holistic health and Fitness Logo

Frequently Asked Questions

The Holistic Health and Fitness System (H2F) is the Army’s primary investment in the health and fitness of our most critical weapon system: the Soldier. H2F will optimize Soldier physical and non-physical performance, mitigate injury, improve rehabilitation after injury, and increase the overall effectiveness of the Total Army. H2F is an enterprise-wide readiness “system” that combines all aspects of physical and non-physical human performance optimization under a single governance to enable commanders to improve Soldier health and fitness. We are bringing a Soldier’s physical readiness training and the non-physical aspect of health, including sleep, proper nutrition, behavioral and spiritual health, under a single system so individuals and commanders can achieve better health outcomes for the entirety of a Soldier’s career. From the day they enter the Army until the day they leave, we have cared for the health and fitness of the whole Soldier.

As of February 2019, ~56K Soldiers were non-deployable (equivalent to 13 Brigade Combat Teams (BCT)), with ~21K on Temporary Profile and ~15.5K on Permanent Profile. In 2018, 56% of Soldiers were injured annually, 71% of which were lower extremity micro-traumatic musculoskeletal “overuse” injuries. Injury is a significant contributor to the Army’s healthcare burden, impacting medical readiness and Soldier health. Musculoskeletal injuries accounted for approximately $557M in patient care costs among active duty Soldiers. H2F was developed in response to these readiness challenges. The H2F System will optimize Soldier personal readiness, reduce injury rates, improve rehabilitation after injury, and increase the overall effectiveness of the Total Army.

H2F consolidates the tenets of various Army health promotion and wellness campaigns and programs (e.g., Performance Triad, Go For Green, Soldier Fueling Initiative, Ready and Resilient Training Centers, Global Assessment Tool, Army Center for Enhanced Performance, Army Wellness Centers) under a single governance structure to better integrate, synchronize, message, and execute across the enterprise. H2F represents a cultural shift in the way commanders train, develop, and care for our most important weapon system, our Soldiers.

Chronic sleep deprivation, fatigue, and insomnia are associated with mental illnesses/injuries that contribute to medically non-available status. According to the 2018 Health of the Force Report, 12% of Soldiers had a sleep disorder (prevalence ranging from 5.8% to 21% across installations). Obesity also impacts a number of Soldiers. In fact, it is a societal problem that affects Army recruitment as 70% of the 17-24 age demographic are ineligible to serve in the military due to obesity. The 2018 Health of the Force Report categorized 17% of active duty Soldiers as obese. These Soldiers are 48% more likely to sustain an injury, and have an 86% increased risk of being non-available. Developed to overcome these health challenges, the H2F System relies on the evidence-based knowledge and best practices of USASOC Tactical Human Optimization, Rapid Rehabilitation, and Reconditioning (THOR3) program’s success over the last 10 years and builds upon Performance Triad.

H2F education will be integrated throughout Army’s institutional training domains which means that new Soldiers will experience components of the H2F System in Basic Combat Training. The health and fitness of America’s youth greatly impacts readiness and recruitment. Factors including poor sleep, inadequate physical activity, poor nutrition, and suboptimal coping skills, singularly or in combination, have a dramatic negative impact on the future force. From FY00 to FY10, first-time failure rates on the modified physical fitness during U.S. Army Initial Entry Training (IET) increased from 4% to 40% for males and from 12% to 54% for females. During the first 90 days of IET, 31% of Soldiers who failed their initial pre-accession Occupational Physical Assessment Test (OPAT) became injured. H2F will reduce attrition for these new Soldiers. Additionally H2F training facilities, established for brigade-size elements, will be exclusively dedicated to holistic physical and non-physical training and programming for Soldiers across the force. Operationally, H2F enablers will be resourced to 110 COMPO I brigades between FY21-26. Each of the 110 brigades will receive H2F Performance Teams, consisting of a wide range of medical and performance enhancement SMEs, equipment and facilities. The USAR and ARNG are implementing pilot programs to assess the functionality of H2F in their respective compos. ARNG currently has H2F programs in 14 states (IN, KY, MA, MN, MS, NM, SC, TX, VA, CT, FL, GA, IA & WA). USAR will begin a pilot in 3rd Quarter, FY21 under a regional-alignment construct. Compo II/III pilots will consist of fitness apps, virtual education, purchase of commercial off the shelf (COTS) training equipment, partnerships with academia & industry, and state-run programs. Successful pilot outcomes will not only inform the future of H2F in the ARNG and USAR, but also benefit the 250K active component Soldiers who don't have direct H2F support in their unit.

The Army has rewritten FM 7-22 Physical Readiness Training as FM 7-22 Holistic Health and Fitness, incorporating evidence-based knowledge and best practices for physical, sleep, nutritional, mental, and spiritual programming. H2F Performance Teams (Physical Therapist (PT), Registered Dietitian (RD), Occupational Therapist (OT), Athletic Trainers Certified (ATC), Cognitive Performance Experts, and Strength & Conditioning Coaches), will support brigade-sized elements, providing far-forward medical care and performance expertise. The H2F doctrinal publication series consists of FM 7-22, as well as Army Techniques Publication (ATP) 7-22.01 (H2F Testing) and ATP 7-22.02 (H2F Drills and Exercises). All three publications are currently available for download at the Army Publishing Directorate (APD) website.

H2F provides an opportunity to obtain a “return on readiness”. For example, a 10% system-generated reduction in musculoskeletal injury would add a full BCT to the battlefield. An H2F-driven 10% reduction in Soldiers who do not meet ABCP standards enables FORSCOM to achieve a 90% deployable rate. A 1% reduction in the non-available rate adds a battalion-sized ready force and $40M in cost avoidance in non-mission capable assets.

H2F must lead cultural change in the Army. To enable this culture change, training in H2F principles will be part of the skills required of Army leaders and embedded in Professional Military Education at all levels. H2F, similar to previous force-wide modernization efforts like digitalization, must be deployed by unit as a complete system. Piecemeal implementation of selected components will not yield the synergistic effect or achieve the desired end state. H2F’s guiding principle integral to its success is that it’s a leader-driven program. Commanders are responsible for its success. H2F Performance Teams advise commanders on performance readiness issues and integrate H2F into organizational training, mission planning and personnel decisions.

In the future, the Army intends to build Soldier Performance Readiness Centers, or SPRCs. SPRC requirements are approx. Forty-thousand square feet broken into five zones: Resistance, Accessory, Agility, Rehab/Sports Medicine, and Administration. Brigades receiving H2F personnel in FY21 will need to use existing facilities until a dedicated facility is converted/constructed.

ARNG has implemented pilot programs to assess the functionality of H2F. ARNG currently has programs in 14 states (IN, KY, MA, MN, MS, NM, SC, TX, VA, CT, FL, GA, IA & WA). Pilot programs consist of fitness apps, virtual education, purchase of commercial off the shelf (COTS) training equipment, partnerships with academia & industry, and state-run programs. Currently, many ARNG units are utilizing existing facility partnerships with high schools, local gyms, and other organizations. The Guard is resourcing H2F by implementing creative solutions including local partnerships, technology apps, mobile platforms, and leveraging subject matter experts in their states. Some states like Georgia have already innovated ways to close that gap between commanders, the Soldier and their H2F teams.

The USAR H2F effort is a key priority. The USAR’s geographic dispersion, limited contact time with Soldiers, and unique organizational structure requires an innovative approach to implementing H2F. USAR intends to execute a Pilot program in 3RD QTR FY21 within the 81st Readiness Division. The one-year Pilot program, which includes two pilot tests conducted simultaneously, will assess the feasibility and effectiveness of this model. These pilot tests will help inform how the USAR implements an H2F program of record for Army Reserve Soldiers.

The ACFT takes a holistic approach to assessing physical fitness as it relates to combat and MOS-specific requirements. Lessons learned over three decades of combat operations, injury statistics, and formal studies determined there are strength and power requirements across five domains of combat physical fitness: muscular strength, muscular endurance, aerobic endurance, explosive power, and anaerobic endurance. The ACFT's predecessor, the three-event Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) only evaluated two of the five domains (aerobic endurance and muscular endurance) and physical training programs were created to address these physical fitness domains, at the exclusion of the other domains. This methodology contributed to increased musculoskeletal injury rates because we were not training holistically. The ACFT and associated training programs in FM7-22, as well as the H2F Performance Teams, help mitigate injury risk and provide "prehab" to prevent injuries before they occur.

H2F Performance Teams consists of physical therapists, registered dietitians, occupational therapists, cognitive enhancement specialists, athletic trainers, and strength and conditioning coaches. H2F Performance Teams advise commanders on performance readiness issues and integrate H2F into organizational training, mission planning and personnel decisions. The H2F Performance Team, in close coordination with the chain of command, will execute a team approach to injury prevention and holistic performance enhancement.

The Army is developing an H2F Trainer MOS which is a future deployable capability. This NCO will possess the knowledge and expertise to facilitate Soldier strength and conditioning, as well as understand the impact of the nonphysical domains on physical performance, in order to enhance readiness. They will lead the implementation of appropriate Soldier training and education in coordination with other members of the H2F Performance Team and the unit leadership.

ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST EVENTS

  • 3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)

    The MDL event represents movements required to safely and effectively lift heavy loads from the ground, jump, bound and tolerate landing. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid upper and lower back injuries caused by moving long distances under heavy load.

    Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times.

    The MDL event represents movements required to safely and effectively lift heavy loads from the ground, jump, bound and tolerate landing. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid upper and lower back injuries caused by moving long distances under heavy load.

    Starting Position
    The Soldier will step inside the hexagon/trap bar, feet generally shoulder width apart, and locate the midpoint of the hexagon/trap bar handles.

    Phase 1 Preparatory Phase
    On the command of “GET SET,” the Soldier will bend at the knees and hips, reach down and grasp the center of the handles (Hexagon/traps bars are not authorized; as an exception, if a dual-handled hexagon/trap bar is used, the Soldier will grasp the lower handles). Arms should be fully extended, back flat, head in line with the spinal column or slightly extended, head and eyes to the front or slightly upward, and heels in contact with the ground. All repetitions will begin from this position.

    Phase 2 Upward Movement Phase
    On the command of “GO,” the Soldier will stand up and lift the bar by extending the hips and knees. Hips should never rise before or above the shoulders. The back should remain straight – not flexed or extended. The Soldier will continue to extend the hips and knees until reaching an upright stance. There is a slight pause at the top of this movement.

    Phase 3 Downward Movement Phase
    By flexing the hips and the knees slowly, the Soldier lowers the bar to the ground under control while maintaining a flat-back position. Do not drop or let go of the bar. The hexagon/trap bar weight plates must touch the ground before beginning the next repetition. Weight plates may not bounce on the ground.

    Execute three continuous repetitions with the same weight. If the Soldier fails to complete three continuous repetitions under control, he or she is permitted one retest at a lower weight. If the Soldier successfully completes three continuous repetitions on the first attempt, he or she may elect an additional attempt at a higher weight. The maximum number of attempts on the MDL is two.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength, balance and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    60-pound hex bar and plates

    IOC Period

    60 and 100 point scores: 140 pounds and 340 pounds

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Sumo Deadlift

    • Alternate Staggered Squat Jump

    • Forward Lunge

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Lifting and moving heavy loads from the ground (personnel and equipment)
    • Extracting a casualty on a litter
  • STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)

    The SPT event represents tasks requiring quick explosive movements to maneuver equipment and personnel.

    Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

    The SPT event represents tasks requiring quick explosive movements to maneuver equipment and personnel.

    Starting Position
    The Soldiers will face away from the start line, grasp the medicine ball (10 pounds) with both hands at hip level and stand with both heels at (but not on or over) the start line. Grasp the ball firmly and as far around the sides of the ball as possible. Towels or rags will be provided to remove excess moisture/debris from the medicine ball.

    Record Throws
    As directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane one executes throw one. Soldiers are permitted several preparatory movements flexing at the trunk, knees, and hips while lowering the ball between their legs. When directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane two executes throw one.

    Soldiers will have two record attempts on the Standing Power Throw. Soldiers in lanes one and two will alternately execute record throw one and two. As directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane one executes the first record attempt. Soldiers are permitted several preparatory movements flexing at the trunk, knees, and hips while lowering the ball between their legs. When directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane two executes first record attempt. A record attempt will not count if a Soldier steps on or beyond the start line or falls to the ground.

    If a Soldier faults on the first record throw, they will receive a raw score of 0.0 meters. If a Soldier faults on the second record throw, they will receive a raw score of 0.0 meters. This Soldier will be allowed one additional attempt to score on the SPT. If the Soldier faults on all three record throws, they will receive a raw score of 0.0 meters for the SPT. If a Soldier has a valid score on either record the first and second throw, they will not be allowed a third attempt.

    Once the Soldier has attempted two record throws, they will move onto the SPT lane to retrieve the medicine balls for the next Soldiers, and then return to the back of the line.

    Although Soldiers are required to execute two record throws and both record throws are recorded, only the longer of the two throws will count as the record score. The start line grader will circle the best score.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Explosive power, balance, and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    10-pound medicine ball

    IOC Period

    60 and 100 point scores: 4.5 and 12.5 meters

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Power Jump

    • Overhead Push Press

    • Tuck Jump

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Throwing equipment onto or over an obstacle
    • Lifting Soldiers up; assisting a buddy to climb up a wall
    • Jumping across and over obstacles
    • Employing progressive levels of force in man-to-man contact
  • HAND RELEASE PUSH-UP - ARM EXTENSION (HRP)

    The HRP is an upper body endurance test that represents repetitive and sustained pushing used in combat tasks.

    2 MINUTES

    Complete as many Hand-Release Push-ups as possible in two minutes

    The HRP is an upper body endurance test that represents repetitive and sustained pushing used in combat tasks.

    Starting position
    On the command of “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position facing the start line with hands flat on the ground and index fingers inside the outer edges of the shoulders. The chest and front of the hips and thighs will be on the ground. Toes will touch the ground with feet together or up to a boot’s width apart. The ankles will be flexed. The head does not have to be on the ground. Feet will remain generally together, no more than a boot’s width apart, throughout the HRP. Soldiers may adjust their feet during the test event as long as they do not lift a foot off the ground.

    Movement 1
    On the command “GO,” a Soldier will push their whole body up from the ground as a single unit to the up position by fully extending the elbows (front leaning rest).

    • The Soldier will maintain a generally straight body alignment from the top of the head to the ankles. This generally straight position will be maintained for the duration of the HRP.
    • Failing to maintain a generally straight alignment during a repetition will cause that repetition to not count.
    • The front leaning rest is the only authorized rest position. Bending or flexing the knees, hips, trunk, or neck while in the rest position is not authorized.

    Movement 2
    After the elbows are fully extended and the Soldier has reached the up position, the Soldier will bend their elbows to lower the body back to the ground. The chest, hips and thighs should touch down at the same time. The head or face do not have to contact the ground.

    Movement 3
    Arm Extension HRP – immediately move both arms out to the side straightening the elbows into the T position. After reaching this position, the elbows bend to move the hands back under the shoulder.

    Movement 4
    Regardless of the HRP protocol, Soldiers must ensure their hands are flat on the ground with the index fingers inside the outer edges of the shoulders (returning to the starting position). This completes one repetition.

    The Soldier will make an immediate movement to place their hands back on the ground to return to the starting position.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Kettlebells

    IOC Period

    60 and 100 point scores: 10 and 60 repetitions

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Supine Chest Press

    • 8-count T Push-up

    • Incline Bench

    • Quadraplex

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Moving obstacles
    • Pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact
    • Pushing a disabled vehicle
    • Getting to and from the ground during evasion and maneuver
    • Reaching out from the prone position when shooting, taking cover, or low crawling
  • SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)

    The SDC is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

    Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint

    The SDC is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

    Starting position
    On the command “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position with the top of the head behind the start line. The grader is positioned to see both the start line and the 25m line. The grader can position a Soldier/battle buddy on the 25m line to ensure compliance with test event standards.

    Sprint
    On the command “GO,” Soldiers stand and sprint 25m; touch the 25m line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    Drag
    Soldiers will grasp each strap handle, which will be positioned and resting on the sled behind the start line; pull the sled backwards until the entire sled crosses the 25m line; turn the sled around and pull back until the entire sled crosses the start line. If the entire sled does not cross the 25m or start line, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    Lateral
    After the entire sled crosses the start line, the Soldier will perform a lateral for 25m, touch the 25m turn line with foot and hand, and perform the lateral back to the start line. The Soldier will face the same direction moving back to the 25m start line and returning to the start line so they lead with each foot. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back. Graders will correct Soldiers if they cross their feet.

    Carry
    Soldiers will grasp the handles of the two 40-pound kettlebells and run to the 25m turn line; step on or over the 25m turn line with one foot; turn and run back to the start line. If the Soldier drops the kettlebells during movement, the carry will resume from the point the kettlebells were dropped. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with their foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    Sprint
    After stepping on/over the start line, Soldiers will place the kettlebells on the ground; turn and sprint 25m; touch the 25m turn line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

    The time is stopped when the Soldier crosses the start line after the final sprint (250 meters).

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Agility, anaerobic endurance, muscular endurance and muscular strength

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    2x40-pound kettlebells and 90-pound sled

    IOC Period

    60 and 100 point scores: 3:00 and 1:33 minutes

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Straight Leg Deadlift

    • Bent Over Row

    • 300M Shuttle Run

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Reacting quickly to direct and indirect fire
    • Building a hasty fighting position
    • Extracting a casualty from a vehicle and carry them to safety
    • Carrying ammunition to a fighting position or vehicle
  • LEG TUCK (LTK)

    The LTK assesses the strength of the Soldiers grip, arm, shoulder and trunk muscles. These muscles assist Soldiers in load carriage and in avoiding injuries to the back.

    Complete as many leg tucks as possible; maintain a relative vertical posture while moving the hips and knees up and down without excessive swinging.

    The LTK assesses the strength of the Soldiers grip, arm, shoulder and trunk muscles. These muscles assist Soldiers in load carriage and in avoiding injuries to the back.

    Starting position
    On the command “GET SET,” one Soldier from each lane will mount the bar and assume a straight-arm hang on the bar, with feet off the ground, knees bent if necessary. Graders may assist Soldiers up onto the bar. The grip is the alternating grip (recommend placing the dominant hand closest to the head). The body is perpendicular with the bar, however the alternating grip will cause the body to rotate outward slightly. The Soldier’s body must be fully extended in a straight arm position (elbows, trunk, and hips are straight). Legs and feet may not be crossed; feet must be off the ground with knees bent if necessary.

    Execution
    On the command “GO,” the Soldier will flex at the elbows, knees, hips, and waist to lift the knees. Flexing the elbows assists with this movement. The right and left knees or thighs must touch the right and left elbows, respectively. The grader must observe both knees or thighs in contact with both elbows for the Soldier to receive credit for the repetition.

    The Soldier will return under control to the straight-arm position, elbows straight, to complete each repetition. If the elbows remain bent, the next repetition will not count. The Soldier does not have to be completely still. Small, inconsequential, or passive movement of the body and twisting of the trunk is permitted. Deliberately swinging the trunk and legs to assist with lifting the knees is not permitted and will cause the subsequent repetition to not count.

    • Can rest in the straight-arm (down) position and may adjust grip positions by moving the hands.
    • Cannot touch the ground during grip adjustments.
    • Cannot drop from the bar before assuming the straight-arm hang position UNDER CONTROL in order for the last repetition to count.

    The event will be terminated when the Soldier voluntarily stops or involuntarily drops from the bar. Using the vertical posts to rest or push from will also be grounds for termination.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength and endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Climbing bar

    IOC Period

    60 and 100 point scores: One and 20 reps

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Bent-Leg Raise

    • Leg Tuck and Twist

    • Alternating Grip Pull-Up

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Surmounting obstacles and walls
    • Rope climbing, descending or traversing
  • TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

    The run event measures aerobic endurance, which is required for conducting continuous operations and ground movements on foot. Higher aerobic endurance allows the body to recover quickly in preparation for executing other physically demanding tasks that may arise during a ground movement, such as reacting quickly to enemy contact.

    Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

    The run event measures aerobic endurance, which is required for conducting continuous operations and ground movements on foot. Higher aerobic endurance allows the body to recover quickly in preparation for executing other physically demanding tasks that may arise during a ground movement, such as reacting quickly to enemy contact.

    The two mile run can be completed on an indoor or outdoor track, or an improved surface such as a road or sidewalk. The 2MR cannot be tested on unimproved terrain. There is a programmed 10-minute rest between the LTK and the 2MR. The rest period begins when the last Soldier in the group completes the LTK. The start and finish line will be near the same location as the test site for the other five test events. Out-and-back or lap track courses are authorized.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Aerobic endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Two mile run route on level field, track or running surface

    IOC Period

    60 and 100 point scores: 21:00 and 13:30 minutes

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Dismounted movement
    • Ruck march
    • Infiltration
  • 3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)

    Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times.

    The MDL event represents movements required to safely and effectively lift heavy loads from the ground, jump, bound and tolerate landing. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid upper and lower back injuries caused by moving long distances under heavy load.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength, balance and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    60-pound hex bar and plates

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 140 pounds and 340 pounds

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Sumo Deadlift

    • Alternate Staggered Squat Jump

    • Forward Lunge

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Lifting and moving heavy loads from the ground (personnel and equipment)
    • Extracting a casualty on a litter
  • STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)

    Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

    The SPT event represents tasks requiring quick explosive movements to maneuver equipment and personnel.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Explosive power, balance, and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    10-pound medicine ball

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 4.5 and 12.5 meters

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Power Jump

    • Overhead Push Press

    • Tuck Jump

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Throwing equipment onto or over an obstacle
    • Lifting Soldiers up; assisting a buddy to climb up a wall
    • Jumping across and over obstacles
    • Employing progressive levels of force in man-to-man contact
  • HAND RELEASE PUSH-UP - ARM EXTENSION (HRP)
    2 MINUTES

    Complete as many Hand-Release Push-ups as possible in two minutes

    The HRP is an upper body endurance test that represents repetitive and sustained pushing used in combat tasks.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Kettlebells

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 10 and 60 repetitions

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Supine Chest Press

    • 8-count T Push-up

    • Incline Bench

    • Quadraplex

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Moving obstacles
    • Pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact
    • Pushing a disabled vehicle
    • Getting to and from the ground during evasion and maneuver
    • Reaching out from the prone position when shooting, taking cover, or low crawling
  • SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)

    Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint

    The SDC is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Agility, anaerobic endurance, muscular endurance and muscular strength

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    2x40-pound kettlebells and 90-pound sled

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 3:00 and 1:33 minutes

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Straight Leg Deadlift

    • Bent Over Row

    • 300M Shuttle Run

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Reacting quickly to direct and indirect fire
    • Building a hasty fighting position
    • Extracting a casualty from a vehicle and carry them to safety
    • Carrying ammunition to a fighting position or vehicle
  • LEG TUCK (LTK)

    Complete as many leg tucks as possible; maintain a relative vertical posture while moving the hips and knees up and down without excessive swinging.

    The LTK assesses the strength of the Soldiers grip, arm, shoulder and trunk muscles. These muscles assist Soldiers in load carriage and in avoiding injuries to the back.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength and endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Climbing bar

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: One and 20 reps

    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Bent-Leg Raise

    • Leg Tuck and Twist

    • Alternating Grip Pull-Up

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Surmounting obstacles and walls
    • Rope climbing, descending or traversing
  • TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

    Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

    The run event measures aerobic endurance, which is required for conducting continuous operations and ground movements on foot. Higher aerobic endurance allows the body to recover quickly in preparation for executing other physically demanding tasks that may arise during a ground movement, such as reacting quickly to enemy contact.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Aerobic endurance

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    Two mile run route on level field, track or running surface

    FIELD TEST

    60 and 100 point scores: 21:00 and 13:30 minutes

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • Dismounted movement
    • Ruck march
    • Infiltration