ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST

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OVERVIEW

The Army Combat Fitness Test is the assessment for the physical domain of the Army's Holistic Health and Fitness System.
As a general physical fitness test, an age and gender performance-normed scoring scale will be used to evaluate a Soldier’s physical fitness.

  • Improve Soldier and unit readiness

  • Transform the Army’s fitness culture

  • Reduce preventable injuries and attrition

  • Enhance mental toughness and stamina

Frequently Asked Questions

General

The Army will implement a revised ACFT, starting on April 1, 2022, that will include several differences based on 630,000 sample ACFT test scores, the RAND independent assessment and feedback from Soldiers. The test now includes performance-normed scoring standards, scaled to age and gender. Additional changes include the plank as the sole core-strength event and the addition of the 2.5-mile walk as an alternate aerobic event. In addition, the Army will establish an ACFT governance body to continue to assess testing data and provide a comprehensive analysis, with any recommended future modifications to the ACFT, in April 2023.

The new scoring standards were developed from historic performance rates and more accurately assess individual physical fitness goals reflective of age and gender categories.

The leg tuck was removed after RAND concluded the exercise did not correctly measure core strength in all Soldiers. Instead, the plank was determined to provide a similar testing experience and more accurately assess core strength for all Soldiers.

The shift to an age and gender performance-normed scoring scale was based on thorough analysis of all data, Soldier feedback, and analysis from the RAND independent study. The adjustment in scoring scales more accurately reflect a distribution of performance across all elements of the Army and ensure a fair transition to a new fitness test of record. The resulting ACFT scoring scales are still rigorous and will enable the Army to promote a culture of physical fitness and readiness.

The new age and gender performance-normed scoring scales were developed using the data from the nearly 630,000 ACFT scores, historic performance rates from the APFT, and scoring scales from other branches of the U.S. military.

The maximum (100 points) was set at the 96th percentile of performance within each age group and for each event. Similarly, the minimum passing score (60 points) for the MDL, SPT, HRP, and SDC was set at the 5th percentile. The remainder of the scales were set using an even distribution of observed Soldier performance. The Army used data from the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy to set the baseline for the plank scale. The two-mile run minimum score was initially set at the 3rd percentile, however, based on observed data, it was adjusted to ensure that no subgroup will be required to complete the ACFT two-mile run faster than the old APFT run standard.

The Army has commissioned additional analytic support from RAND and established a six-month delay before commencing record testing to further reduce any remaining risk to our Soldiers. Additionally, the Army has established a governance structure with oversight by Army Senior Leaders to continue analysis and closely monitor the ACFT. The Army expects Soldiers to pass the ACFT at rates similar to the APFT and will reassess standards over time.

Based on analysis of observed test data, the Army determined that the plank simply provides a more accurate measure of core strength for all Soldiers. The RAND independent study observed that the leg tuck was not an accurate predictor of core strength for all Soldiers, as it requires a minimum pre-requisite upper body strength that made it impossible to measure core strength across all Soldiers commensurately. In response, we are using the plank as the sole exercise to assess core strength, using recognized standards from the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy as a baseline and modifying the scales based on Army requirements.

Moving to the plank as the sole core assessment allows the Army to verify that the ACFT properly measures all Soldiers’ core strength consistently and equally. In addition, it ensures Soldiers have a similar testing experience and opportunity to succeed during every event of the ACFT. Incorporating the plank in a time-phased, deliberate manner will ensure that all Soldiers can adjust to the plank prior to the ACFT being implemented for personnel actions.

The 2.5-mile walk was added as an alternative aerobic endurance exercise to support those locations unable to provide the equipment or facilities needed for the row, bike, or swim alternate events. Additionally, the walk is now an option for Soldiers whose medical providers determine it the most appropriate alternate aerobic event for them due to their physical limitations. Nearly 630,000 ACFT scores were entered into the Digital Training Management System over the study period and were used by Army Senior Leaders when making a decision on full implementation of the ACFT. Those entries provided sufficient data for the Army to evaluate the alternate aerobic events and provide adjustments. We will continue to monitor data on the ACFT and recommend changes if necessary.

The Army determined that a general fitness test best supports the Army’s efforts to sustain a fit and ready force, foster a fitness culture, and ensure fairness across the force. As a general fitness test, an age and gender performance-normed scale more accurately assesses individual physical fitness. Age and gender neutral standards fail to account for physiological differences between people of varied ages and genders. Norming for age and gender provides a more tailored assessment of an individual’s general level of physical fitness. Implementing the ACFT as a general physical fitness assessment also allows all Soldiers the ability to fairly compete for advancement in the Army. We will continue to evaluate ACFT data and recommend changes when necessary to ensure the Army is a physically fit force. The change to a general fitness test does not preclude certain Army schools, such as Ranger, Sapper, or Special Forces Assessment and Selection, from requiring higher standards of physical fitness.

Physical fitness is an important component of individual and unit readiness. We must make sure that all Soldiers, regardless of MOS, are physically and mentally prepared to deploy, fight, win, and return home. The ACFT provides the Army an assessment of all Soldiers’ muscular strength, muscle endurance, power, speed, agility, coordination, flexibility, balance, reaction time, and aerobic capacity. We owe it to our Soldiers to equip them with the tools to succeed and maximize their physical fitness potential.

The Army is implementing the new version of the ACFT based on data collection of nearly 630,000 tests, independent reviews, and Soldier feedback. The Army has requested additional analytic support from RAND to assess the implementation of the current test, which will continue throughout the diagnostic period.

The Army is committed to making ACFT the best measure of a Soldier’s physical readiness and has requested RAND analytical support to provide any potential additional recommendations based on the new changes. The Army has established a governance body with oversight by Army Senior Leaders, to continue analysis and closely monitor ACFT scores, pass rates, injuries and environmental considerations, and report those findings with any recommended changes to Army Senior Leaders on a semi-annual basis.

The ACFT is a far better assessment of Soldiers overall physical fitness levels than the legacy APFT. Soldiers must possess muscular strength, muscular endurance, power, speed, agility, coordination, flexibility, balance, reaction time, and aerobic capacity. The ACFT assesses these components of physical fitness and is transforming the culture of fitness in the Army, with the goal of reducing preventable injuries and attrition while increasing individual Soldier readiness.

Overall, professional studies show increased physical fitness leads to a decreased risk of muscular skeleton injuries, faster injury recovery times, and better performance. The ACFT is designed to increase Soldier’s overall physical fitness levels and early indications suggest the ACFT may decrease injuries. Further study is needed to determine to what extent the ACFT is reducing injuries. The Army is establishing a governance structure to provide oversight of the full implementation of the ACFT and will assess ACFT scores, pass rates, injuries, and environmental considerations and report those findings, along with any recommended changes, to Army Senior Leaders.

Soldiers are exempt from taking a record physical fitness test while pregnant and for 365 days after the conclusion of pregnancy, including Soldiers who experience perinatal loss.

Soldiers are also exempt from other regular unit physical readiness training requirements (such as diagnostic physical fitness tests, timed distance runs, timed distance ruck marches, and order of merit list (OML)-generating physical requirements) outside the Pregnancy Postpartum Physical Training (P3T) program for 180 days after the conclusion of pregnancy. After 180 days, Soldiers will return to regular unit fitness training. Modified activities within a Soldier’s limits, and as noted on the Soldier’s profile, are encouraged within the 180 days.

Soldiers may elect an early release from the P3T program and return to their regular unit physical readiness training. Soldiers can volunteer to take any record physical fitness requirement within their exemption period without ending the exemption early.

From more information, see Army Directive 2022-06 (Parenthood, Pregnancy, and Postpartum).

RAND Study

The independent RAND study had four top-level recommendations for full ACFT implementation:

  • Address shortfalls in the ACFT evidence base
  • Consider ways to mitigate impacts on the workforce
  • Take steps to further support training improvements over time
  • Institutionalize a formal senior-level management structure to guide and oversee ACFT implementation

To address shortfalls in the ACFT evidence base, the Army decided to implement the ACFT as a general physical fitness assessment and provide a time-phased process for implementation. This will allow Soldiers to train for six months or longer before test scores are used for personnel actions, to further reduce any remaining risk to our Soldiers. The Army has also commissioned analytic support from RAND to assess data from the revised ACFT following implementation in April 2022, which will inform the Army’s implementation and oversight of the ACFT in the future.

The Army will mitigate impacts to the workforce through the new scoring scales and by incorporating the ACFT into personnel policy in a time-phased, deliberate manner, to ensure all Soldiers can test and adjust to the new scoring scale. We expect with these changes, the ACFT will have no greater impact on recruiting and retention than the previous Army Physical Fitness Test. Moreover, the Army will establish an ACFT governance body to continue to assess test data, impacts to elements of the force, and issue a comprehensive assessment to the Secretary of the Army in April 2023.

The phased implementation also provides Soldiers time to improve performance on individual events prior to taking the test for record. We are confident Soldiers’ performance on the ACFT will increase with time, training, and under “for record” test conditions. The 2.5 mile walk was added as an alternate aerobic exercise to support Soldiers who are physically unable to perform the other alternate events and for those in locations without the equipment or facilities needed for the alternate row, bike, or swim events.

The Army has also expanded access to ACFT training equipment across all Army components, issuing over 40,000 sets of equipment across all components, an average of 1 set per every 25 Soldiers. Multiple training plans, which include equipment-free options, are available through a mobile app, Army doctrine, and the Army’s ACFT microsite.

Finally, the Army will establish a governance structure to provide oversight of the full implementation of the ACFT. This structure will assess ACFT scores, pass rates, injuries, and environmental considerations and report those findings along with any recommended changes to Army Senior Leaders regularly. The first comprehensive report will be provided in April 2023.

RAND identified that if implemented as a gender-neutral test, the ACFT could negatively affect recruiting and retention of some occupational specialties. The new age and gender performance-normed scoring scale will mitigate impacts to the workforce, as will incorporating the ACFT into personnel policy in a time-phased, deliberate manner to ensure that all Soldiers can test and adjust to the new scoring scale. We expect with these changes, the ACFT will have the same impact on recruiting and retention as the previous Army Physical Fitness Test. The Army will establish an ACFT governance body to continue to assess test data, monitor impacts, and deliver an assessment to the Secretary of the Army in April 2023.

The RAND study showed higher elevation and temperature had a slightly negative impact on performance on the two-mile run for both men and women, though RAND acknowledged there are several factors that might have impacted the results. Commanders are expected to comply with current policies and guidance that already address testing in various environmental conditions, including weather, and testing locations, such as deployments and remote assignments. The Army has directed commanders to develop procedures that ensure all assigned Soldiers have sufficient time to properly acclimate to a duty station prior to taking an ACFT. Commanders will consider, at the very least, weather cycles, temperatures, altitude, and lengthy field exercises or deployments in developing local policy. We will continuously monitor data on the ACFT and recommend changes when necessary.

Policy

The ACFT will be incorporated into personnel policy in a time-phased, deliberate manner, beginning April 1, 2022, to ensure all Soldiers have the opportunity to test and familiarize themselves with the new event and scoring scale.

Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve (AGR) Soldiers will take a diagnostic ACFT between April 1, 2022 and Sept. 30, 2022. Soldiers who pass the ACFT during the diagnostic period can use their test for record any time after Oct. 1, 2022. (The Army will publish a subsequent order providing detailed instructions on the procedures for re-characterizing a diagnostic ACFT to a record ACFT).

Reserve Component Soldiers will take a diagnostic ACFT between April 1, 2022 and March 31, 2023 and will have the same option to use their diagnostic test for record after April 1, 2023. (The Army will publish a subsequent order providing detailed instructions on the procedures for re-characterizing a diagnostic ACFT to a record ACFT).

All Regular Army and AGR Soldiers are required to take a record ACFT beginning Oct. 1, 2022, with Regular Army and AGR Soldiers taking their first record test prior to April 1, 2023 and Reserve Component Soldiers taking their first record test prior to April 1, 2024. Record ACFT scores will be used for RA & USAR AGR administrative actions starting Oct. 1, 2022, while the Reserve Component will use ACFT beginning Apr. 1, 2023 for personnel actions, to include retention and evaluations. The ACFT will be a requirement for all Professional Military Education starting on or after Oct. 1, 2022, regardless of component.

Soldiers will receive a flag if they fail a record ACFT after Oct. 1, 2022 for Regular Army and USAR Active Guard Reserve or after April 1, 2023 for Reserve Component (RC). However, if RC Soldiers attending professional military education for classes that start on or after Oct. 1, 2022, fail both a record test and a retest during the course, they will be removed from the course.

Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve Soldiers will retest no less than 120 days and no more than 180 days from the test failure. Reserve Component Soldiers will retest no less than 180 days and no more than 240 days from the test failure. If the commander and Soldier agree that sufficient reconditioning has occurred, the Soldier may retest in less than the prescribed time. The time a Soldier is on a temporary profile does not count toward the retesting timelines. These retesting timelines do not apply to Initial Military Training and Professional Military Education courses.

Commanders will not initiate separation or bar to continued service of any Soldier prior to April 1, 2023 for Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve Soldiers or April 1, 2024 for Reserve Component Soldiers. After those respective dates, if a Soldier has failed two consecutive record ACFTs, commanders can use discretion to either initiate separation or initiate a bar to continued service. These polices are identical to the Army’s legacy APFT policies.

Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve Soldiers will take two record ACFTs per calendar year starting Oct. 1, 2022, with no less than 4 months between record tests. Reserve Component Soldiers will take a record ACFT once per calendar year, with no less than 8 months between record tests.

All permanent profiles must be updated by the Soldier’s medical provider to reflect the ACFT events permitted or prohibited. Soldiers must test on all events within the limits of their permanent profile. The minimum number of events a Soldier must take is one aerobic event (run, stationary bike, swim, row, or walk).

Soldiers on temporary profiles will not take the ACFT. They will recover, rehabilitate, recondition, and complete the full ACFT once the temporary profile has ended and the Soldier is cleared by their medical provider to resume testing.

Soldiers flagged for failing to pass the ACFT will be ineligible for promotion effective Oct. 1, 2022 for Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve and April 1, 2023 for Reserve Component Soldiers.

Beginning with the June 2023 promotion month for sergeant and staff sergeant promotion points, the Soldier’s last record APFT will be used through March 31, 2023, for Regular Army and USAR AGR, and through Mar. 31, 2024 for U.S. Army Reserve Soldiers. Additional guidance is under revision and will be announced at a later date. The Director, Army National Guard will issue guidance to facilitate Army National Guard implementation.

Soldiers with permanent physical profiles will be granted 60 points for each ACFT event not taken due to their profile and will also receive 60 points for passing an alternate event. The total points for the ACFT will correlate to a numeric score for the fitness test category on the Promotion Point Worksheet. Soldiers with temporary profiles, to include pregnancy postpartum, will be awarded a minimum passing score of 360 points for the ACFT.

For the purpose of awarding promotion points, Soldiers who have never taken a record APFT will be awarded a minimum passing ACFT score (360 points) and Soldiers who have a record APFT score in DTMS will be awarded an ACFT score equal to twice the number previously achieved on their last record APFT (APFT x2). During these periods, E-4s and E-5s with no record APFT in DTMS will be provided the opportunity to take the APFT for promotion purposes.

For Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve, evaluations will indicate ACFT status on officer evaluations reports (OERs) and noncommissioned officer evaluation reports (NCOERs) ending with thru dates of Oct. 1, 2022 or later. For the Reserve Component, evaluations will indicate ACFT status on OERs and NCOERs ending with thru dates of April 1, 2023 or later.

Academic evaluation reports (AERs) for military training courses beginning Oct. 1, 2022 or later will indicate ACFT status as required.

Prior to Oct. 1, 2022 for Regular Army and USAR Active Guard Reserve and April 1, 2023 for the Reserve Component, Soldiers who are not flagged for an APFT/ACFT failure and are recommended for retention by their immediate commander will be allowed to reenlist.

After Oct. 1, 2022 for RA/USAR AGR and April 1, 2023 for the RC, Soldiers must have a passing ACFT within the previous 12 months to be eligible for reenlistment. Soldiers without a passing ACFT on or after their respective dates will have the option to extend up to 12 months to provide them opportunity to pass a record ACFT.

The Occupational Physical Assessment Test (OPAT) is the required test to assess into the Army. The ACFT has no impact on accessions.

All Soldiers from all components must have a passing record ACFT to graduate from initial military training courses ending on or after Oct. 1, 2022. The Commanding General, U.S. Training and Doctrine Command; The Surgeon General; The Judge Advocate General; and the Chief of Chaplains retain current authorities to approve waivers.

Beginning April 1, 2023 a passing record ACFT score is required for contracting Senior Reserve Officer Training Corps (SROTC) cadets and commissioning (all components).

Soldiers must pass a record ACFT to graduate from all Professional Military Education courses starting on Oct. 1, 2022 or later. Proponents of troop schools and functional training courses may require an ACFT as either an entrance or graduation requirement, regardless of course length, for any course starting on or after Oct. 1, 2022. These requirements apply to all components.

Although commanders can’t set physical standards for acceptance into or retention in a combat unit, commanders can encourage Soldiers to maximize their physical potential.

Equipment

The required equipment to conduct the ACFT includes deadlift hex bars with weights and collars, nylon drag sleds with straps and plates (each weighted with two 45-pound plates), 10-pound medicine balls, 40-pound kettle bells, and a location to do the run. See ATP 7-22.01 Holistic Health and Fitness Testing, Appendix E for specific ACFT testing equipment as well as ACFT field requirements.

ACFT equipment is available through the Defense Logistics Agency at unit expense. Below are the ACFT equipment set and component National Stock Numbers (NSN) and nomenclature.

  • NSN: 6930-01-692-1671 / LANE, ARMY COMBAT FITNESS EQUIPMENT]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6430 / BARBELL COLLAR/SPRING / QTY 1 / [2 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6427 / HEXAGON BARBELL / QTY 1 / [1 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6438 / KETTLEBELL, 40 LBS / QTY 1 / [2 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6410 / BUMPER PLATE, 10 LBS / QTY 1 / [4 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6409 / BUMPER PLATE, 15 LBS / QTY 1 / [2 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6415 / BUMPER PLATE, 25 LBS / QTY 1 / [2 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6419 / BUMPER PLATE, 35 LBS / QTY 1 / [2 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6420 / BUMPER PLATE, 45 LBS / QTY 1 / [8 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6435 / MEDICINE BALL, RUBBER, 10 LBS / QTY 1 / [1 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6433 / NYLON SLED W/PULL STRAP / QTY 1 / [1 PER SET]
  • NSN: 6930-01-684-6431 / MEASURING TAPE / QTY 1 / [1 PER SET]

No, implementation of the ACFT accounts for various considerations arising from all components of the Army. The Army is incorporating the ACFT into personnel policies in a time-phased, deliberate manner to ensure all Soldiers can train and adjust to the new event and scoring scales before scores are used for personnel actions. Record scores for National Guard and Army Reserve Soldiers commence in April 2023, thereby giving Reserve Component Soldiers a full year to train for the revised test before any personnel actions are implemented.

The Army is committed to providing equivalent training opportunities to all Soldiers in all components and fairness in the transition to the ACFT. ACFT equipment is not required for training and the Army has released an ACFT training guide and an app with training plans and exercises to help Soldiers successfully prepare for the test anytime, anywhere. The ACFT YouTube page has videos of exercises to help prepare for the ACFT, many of which require no equipment. Additional resources can be found on the Army Training Network and MilSuite.

Additionally, commanders are required to administer at least one diagnostic ACFT prior to record testing to ensure Soldiers are adequately prepared.

The Army equipped units with $78 million worth of ACFT equipment, with 10,829 sets of equipment going to the Active Component, compared to 15,854 sets of equipment to the National Guard, and 8,037 sets to the Army Reserve. Additionally, TRADOC ordered another 5,029 sets of equipment that were distributed to recruiting stations, ROTC detachments, and TRADOC installations. The overall ratio of equipment sets to Soldiers for the Total Army is 1:25, with more sets issued to the Reserve Components than to active duty Soldiers (1:30 active, 1:21 National Guard, and 1:23 Reserve). Leaders are strongly encouraged to use this equipment for Physical Readiness Training during their drill weekends and to help Soldiers familiarize with the test.

Reserve Component Soldiers looking for ACFT equipment to test or train on should contact their readiness NCO or chain of command, or they can coordinate with their local recruiting station or ROTC program. The National Guard is also updating the list of locations with ACFT equipment by state on the National Guard Bureau’s SharePoint site (CAC required).

Additionally, the Army added the 2.5 mile walk as an alternate aerobic event to accommodate for any lack of equipment to conduct the other alternate aerobic events.

Regular Army, National Guard, and Army Reserve units are developing tailored solutions to training for the ACFT, using FM 7-22 as a guide, and adapting to their individual situations and resources. FM 7-22 provides recommended training schedules for all phases of unit training cycles, to include the Reserve Component and remotely located Soldiers.

ACFT equipment is not required for training and the Army has released an ACFT training guide and an app with training plans and exercises to help Soldiers successfully prepare for the test anytime, anywhere. Additionally, the ACFT YouTube page has videos of exercises to help prepare for the ACFT, many of which require no equipment. Additional resources can be found on the Army Training Network and MilSuite.

Grader and NCOIC/OIC Training

All installations and commands must self-sustain the ACFT grader and NCOIC/OIC training requirements found in FM 7-22 and ATP 7-22.01. For more information, check out the ACFT Grader and NCOIC/OIC Training Validation in the Resources section at the bottom of the ACFT microsite.

Yes. After you have attended training you are encouraged to conduct training at your unit to validate others to the same level you have been trained. For example, a Grader can train other Graders, and an NCOIC/OIC can train another OIC/NCOIC and Graders.

TYes. MFT is not a prerequisite for ACFT Grader and NCOIC/OIC validation.

ACFT Implementation Timeline

APRIL 2022
Soldiers take diagnostic tests.

OCTOBER 2022
Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve start taking the ACFT for record on Oct 1, 2022.

APRIL 2023
Reserve Component Soldiers start taking the ACFT for record. All Regular Army and Active Guard Reserve Soldiers must have a record ACFT no later than April 1, 2023.

APRIL 2024
Reserve Component Soldiers must have a record ACFT no later than April 1, 2024.

Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F)

The Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) System is the Army’s primary investment in Soldier readiness and lethality, optimal physical and non-physical performance, reduced injury rates, improved rehabilitation after injury and increased overall effectiveness of the Total Army. The system empowers and equips Soldiers to take charge of their health, fitness and well-being in order to optimize individual performance, while preventing injury and disease.

DOWNLOAD: FM 7-22: Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F)

DOWNLOAD: FM 7-22: Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) Audiobook

DOWNLOAD: ATP 7-22.01: H2F Testing

DOWNLOAD: ATP 7-22.02: H2F Drills and Exercises

DOWNLOAD: The H2F Operating Concept

Holistic health and Fitness Logo

ARMY COMBAT FITNESS TEST EVENTS

  • 3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)

    The MDL assesses the Muscular Strength component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s lower body, grip and core muscular strength. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid hip, knee and lower back injuries. Flexibility and balance are secondary components of fitness assessed by the MDL.

    Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times.

    The MDL assesses the Muscular Strength component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s lower body, grip and core muscular strength. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid hip, knee and lower back injuries. Flexibility and balance are secondary components of fitness assessed by the MDL.

    Starting Position
    The Soldier will step inside the hexagon/trap bar, feet generally shoulder width apart, and locate the midpoint of the hexagon/trap bar handles.

    Phase 1 Preparatory Phase
    On the command of “GET SET,” the Soldier will bend at the knees and hips, reach down and grasp the center of the handles (Hexagon/traps bars are not authorized; as an exception, if a dual-handled hexagon/trap bar is used, the Soldier will grasp the lower handles). Arms should be fully extended, back flat, head in line with the spinal column or slightly extended, head and eyes to the front or slightly upward, and heels in contact with the ground. All repetitions will begin from this position.

    Phase 2 Upward Movement Phase
    On the command of “GO,” the Soldier will stand up and lift the bar by extending the hips and knees. Hips should never rise before or above the shoulders. The back should remain straight – not flexed or extended. The Soldier will continue to extend the hips and knees until reaching an upright stance. There is a slight pause at the top of this movement.

    Phase 3 Downward Movement Phase
    By flexing the hips and the knees slowly, the Soldier lowers the bar to the ground under control while maintaining a flat-back position. Do not drop or let go of the bar. The hexagon/trap bar weight plates must touch the ground before beginning the next repetition. Weight plates may not bounce on the ground.

    Execute three continuous repetitions with the same weight. If the Soldier fails to complete three continuous repetitions under control, he or she is permitted one retest at a lower weight. If the Soldier successfully completes three continuous repetitions on the first attempt, he or she may elect an additional attempt at a higher weight. The maximum number of attempts on the MDL is two.

    FITNESS COMPONENTS

    Muscular strength, balance and flexibility

    STANDARD EQUIPMENT

    60-pound hex bar and plates

    FIELD TEST

    Scoring Scale
    HOW TO TRAIN
    FOR THIS EVENT?
    • Sumo Deadlift

    • Alternate Staggered Squat Jump

    • Forward Lunge

    APPLICATION TO
    COMMON SOLDIER
    TASKS
    • STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)

      The SPT event assesses the Power component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s ability to generate quick, explosive movements with their upper and lower body. Secondary components of fitness assessed by the SPT include Balance, Coordination and Flexibility.

      Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

      The SPT event assesses the Power component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s ability to generate quick, explosive movements with their upper and lower body. Secondary components of fitness assessed by the SPT include Balance, Coordination and Flexibility.

      Starting Position
      The Soldiers will face away from the start line, grasp the medicine ball (10 pounds) with both hands at hip level and stand with both heels at (but not on or over) the start line. Grasp the ball firmly and as far around the sides of the ball as possible. Towels or rags will be provided to remove excess moisture/debris from the medicine ball.

      Record Throws
      As directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane one executes throw one. Soldiers are permitted several preparatory movements flexing at the trunk, knees, and hips while lowering the ball between their legs. When directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane two executes throw one.

      Soldiers will have two record attempts on the Standing Power Throw. Soldiers in lanes one and two will alternately execute record throw one and two. As directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane one executes the first record attempt. Soldiers are permitted several preparatory movements flexing at the trunk, knees, and hips while lowering the ball between their legs. When directed by the grader, the Soldier in lane two executes first record attempt. A record attempt will not count if a Soldier steps on or beyond the start line or falls to the ground.

      If a Soldier faults on the first record throw, they will receive a raw score of 0.0 meters. If a Soldier faults on the second record throw, they will receive a raw score of 0.0 meters. This Soldier will be allowed one additional attempt to score on the SPT. If the Soldier faults on all three record throws, they will receive a raw score of 0.0 meters for the SPT. If a Soldier has a valid score on either record the first and second throw, they will not be allowed a third attempt.

      Once the Soldier has attempted two record throws, they will move onto the SPT lane to retrieve the medicine balls for the next Soldiers, and then return to the back of the line.

      Although Soldiers are required to execute two record throws and both record throws are recorded, only the longer of the two throws will count as the record score. The start line grader will circle the best score.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Explosive power, balance, coordination and flexibility

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      10-pound medicine ball

      FIELD TEST

      Scoring Scale
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Power Jump

      • Overhead Push Press

      • Tuck Jump

      APPLICATION TO
      COMMON SOLDIER
      TASKS
      • Throwing equipment onto or over an obstacle
      • Lifting Soldiers up; assisting a buddy to climb up a wall
      • Jumping across and over obstacles
      • Employing progressive levels of force in man-to-man contact
    • HAND RELEASE PUSH-UP - ARM EXTENSION (HRP)

      The HRP assesses the Muscular Endurance component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s upper body endurance. The HRP is a strong driver for upper body and core strength training. Flexibility is a secondary component of fitness assessed by the HRP.

      2 MINUTES

      Complete as many Hand-Release Push-ups as possible in two minutes

      The HRP assesses the Muscular Endurance component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s upper body endurance. The HRP is a strong driver for upper body and core strength training. Flexibility is a secondary component of fitness assessed by the HRP.

      Starting position
      On the command of “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position facing the start line with hands flat on the ground and index fingers inside the outer edges of the shoulders. The chest and front of the hips and thighs will be on the ground. Toes will touch the ground with feet together or up to a boot’s width apart. The ankles will be flexed. The head does not have to be on the ground. Feet will remain generally together, no more than a boot’s width apart, throughout the HRP. Soldiers may adjust their feet during the test event as long as they do not lift a foot off the ground.

      Movement 1
      On the command “GO,” a Soldier will push their whole body up from the ground as a single unit to the up position by fully extending the elbows (front leaning rest).

      • The Soldier will maintain a generally straight body alignment from the top of the head to the ankles. This generally straight position will be maintained for the duration of the HRP.
      • Failing to maintain a generally straight alignment during a repetition will cause that repetition to not count.
      • The front leaning rest is the only authorized rest position. Bending or flexing the knees, hips, trunk, or neck while in the rest position is not authorized.

      Movement 2
      After the elbows are fully extended and the Soldier has reached the up position, the Soldier will bend their elbows to lower the body back to the ground. The chest, hips and thighs should touch down at the same time. The head or face do not have to contact the ground.

      Movement 3
      Arm Extension HRP – immediately move both arms out to the side straightening the elbows into the T position. After reaching this position, the elbows bend to move the hands back under the shoulder.

      Movement 4
      Regardless of the HRP protocol, Soldiers must ensure their hands are flat on the ground with the index fingers inside the outer edges of the shoulders (returning to the starting position). This completes one repetition.

      The Soldier will make an immediate movement to place their hands back on the ground to return to the starting position.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular endurance and flexibility

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      Level surface

      FIELD TEST

      Scoring Scale
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Supine Chest Press

      • 8-count T Push-up

      • Incline Bench

      • Quadraplex

      APPLICATION TO
      COMMON SOLDIER
      TASKS
      • Moving obstacles
      • Pushing an opponent away during man-to-man contact
      • Pushing a disabled vehicle
      • Getting to and from the ground during evasion and maneuver
      • Reaching out from the prone position when shooting, taking cover, or low crawling
    • SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)

      The SDC assesses the Muscular Endurance, Muscular Strength, Anaerobic Power and Anaerobic Endurance components of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s ability to sustain moderate to high intensity muscular work over a short duration. Secondary components of fitness assessed by the SDC include Balance, Coordination, Agility, Flexibility and Reaction Time.

      Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint

      The SDC assesses the Muscular Endurance, Muscular Strength, Anaerobic Power and Anaerobic Endurance components of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s ability to sustain moderate to high intensity muscular work over a short duration. Secondary components of fitness assessed by the SDC include Balance, Coordination, Agility, Flexibility and Reaction Time.

      Starting position
      On the command “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position with the top of the head behind the start line. The grader is positioned to see both the start line and the 25m line. The grader can position a Soldier/battle buddy on the 25m line to ensure compliance with test event standards.

      Sprint
      On the command “GO,” Soldiers stand and sprint 25m; touch the 25m line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

      Drag
      Soldiers will grasp each strap handle, which will be positioned and resting on the sled behind the start line; pull the sled backwards until the entire sled crosses the 25m line; turn the sled around and pull back until the entire sled crosses the start line. If the entire sled does not cross the 25m or start line, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

      Lateral
      After the entire sled crosses the start line, the Soldier will perform a lateral for 25m, touch the 25m turn line with foot and hand, and perform the lateral back to the start line. The Soldier will face the same direction moving back to the 25m start line and returning to the start line so they lead with each foot. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back. Graders will correct Soldiers if they cross their feet.

      Carry
      Soldiers will grasp the handles of the two 40-pound kettlebells and run to the 25m turn line; step on or over the 25m turn line with one foot; turn and run back to the start line. If the Soldier drops the kettlebells during movement, the carry will resume from the point the kettlebells were dropped. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with their foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

      Sprint
      After stepping on/over the start line, Soldiers will place the kettlebells on the ground; turn and sprint 25m; touch the 25m turn line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m turn line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

      The time is stopped when the Soldier crosses the start line after the final sprint (250 meters).

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular endurance, muscular strength, anaerobic power and anaerobic endurance

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      2x40-pound kettlebells and 90-pound sled

      FIELD TEST

      Scoring Scale
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Straight Leg Deadlift

      • Bent Over Row

      • 300M Shuttle Run

      APPLICATION TO
      COMMON SOLDIER
      TASKS
      • Reacting quickly to direct and indirect fire
      • Building a hasty fighting position
      • Extracting a casualty from a vehicle and carry them to safety
      • Carrying ammunition to a fighting position or vehicle
    • PLANK (PLK)

      The PLK assesses the Muscular Endurance component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s core strength and endurance. Balance is a secondary component of fitness assessed by the PLK.

      Maintain a proper plank position for as long as possible

      The PLK assesses the Muscular Endurance component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s core strength and endurance. Balance is a secondary component of fitness assessed by the PLK.

      Starting position
      On the command “GET READY” hands must be on the ground, either in fists with pinky side of the hand touching the ground or lying flat with palms down, no more than the grader’s fist-width apart; elbows will be bent, aligned with the shoulders, forearms flat on the ground forming a triangle; hips should be bent with one or both knees resting on the ground.

      Execution
      Once all Soldiers are in the ready position, the grader shall issue the command “GRADERS READY, GET SET”, and then “GO.” On “GO” the Soldier lifts both knees off the ground and moves the hips into a straight line with the legs, shoulders, head and eyes focused on the ground, similar to the “front leaning rest” position.

      Feet may be up to the graders’ boot-width apart. Elbows should be aligned with the shoulders with forearms forming a triangle. Ankles should be flexed with the bottom of the toes on the ground. Maintain a straight body alignment from the head to the ankles. After the command “GO”, the grader will call out 15 second time intervals until the completion of the event. Time is tracked with a stopwatch.

      The head, shoulders, back, hips and legs shall be straight from head to heels and must remain so throughout the test. Feet, forearms, and fists/palms shall remain in contact with the floor throughout the exercise.

      The plank event is terminated when the Soldier touches the floor with any part of the body except the feet, forearms, or fists, or, raises a foot or hand off the floor, or, fails to maintain the straight-line position from head to heels.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular endurance and balance

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      Level surface

      FIELD TEST

      Scoring Scale
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Bent-Leg Raise

      • Leg Tuck and Twist

      • Side Bridge

      APPLICATION TO
      COMMON SOLDIER
      TASKS
      • Surmounting obstacles and walls
      • Rope climbing, descending or traversing
    • TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

      The 2MR assesses the Aerobic Endurance component of fitness. Higher aerobic endurance allows a Soldier to work for long periods of time and to recover more quickly when executing repetitive physical tasks.

      Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

      The 2MR assesses the Aerobic Endurance component of fitness. Higher aerobic endurance allows a Soldier to work for long periods of time and to recover more quickly when executing repetitive physical tasks.

      The two mile run can be completed on an indoor or outdoor track, or an improved surface such as a road or sidewalk. The 2MR cannot be tested on unimproved terrain. The start and finish line will be near the same location as the test site for the other five test events. Out-and-back or lap track courses are authorized.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Aerobic endurance

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      Two mile run route on level field, track or running surface

      FIELD TEST

      Scoring Scale
      APPLICATION TO
      COMMON SOLDIER
      TASKS
      • Dismounted movement
      • Ruck march
      • Infiltration
    • 3 REPETITION MAXIMUM DEADLIFT (MDL)

      Deadlift the maximum weight possible three times.

      The MDL assesses the Muscular Strength component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s lower body, grip and core muscular strength. It requires well-conditioned back and leg muscles and helps Soldiers to avoid hip, knee and lower back injuries. Flexibility and balance are secondary components of fitness assessed by the MDL.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular strength, balance and flexibility

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      60-pound hex bar and plates

      DEMONSTRATION

      Watch Video
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Sumo Deadlift

      • Alternate Staggered Squat Jump

      • Forward Lunge

    • STANDING POWER THROW (SPT)

      Throw a 10-pound medicine ball backward and overhead for distance.

      The SPT event assesses the Power component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s ability to generate quick, explosive movements with their upper and lower body. Secondary components of fitness assessed by the SPT include Balance, Coordination and Flexibility.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Explosive power, balance, coordination and flexibility

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      10-pound medicine ball

      DEMONSTRATION

      Watch Video
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Power Jump

      • Overhead Push Press

      • Tuck Jump

    • HAND RELEASE PUSH-UP - ARM EXTENSION (HRP)
      2 MINUTES

      Complete as many Hand-Release Push-ups as possible in two minutes

      The HRP assesses the Muscular Endurance component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s upper body endurance. The HRP is a strong driver for upper body and core strength training. Flexibility is a secondary component of fitness assessed by the HRP.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular endurance and flexibility

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      Level surface

      DEMONSTRATION

      Watch Video
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Supine Chest Press

      • 8-count T Push-up

      • Incline Bench

      • Quadraplex

    • SPRINT-DRAG-CARRY (SDC)

      Conduct 5 x 50 meter shuttles for time - sprint, drag, lateral, carry and sprint

      The SDC assesses the Muscular Endurance, Muscular Strength, Anaerobic Power and Anaerobic Endurance components of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s ability to sustain moderate to high intensity muscular work over a short duration. Secondary components of fitness assessed by the SDC include Balance, Coordination, Agility, Flexibility and Reaction Time.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular endurance, muscular strength, anaerobic power and anaerobic endurance

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      2x40-pound kettlebells and 90-pound sled

      DEMONSTRATION

      Watch Video
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Straight Leg Deadlift

      • Bent Over Row

      • 300M Shuttle Run

    • PLANK (PLK)

      Maintain a proper plank position for as long as possible

      The PLK assesses the Muscular Endurance component of fitness by measuring a Soldier’s core strength and endurance. Balance is a secondary component of fitness assessed by the PLK.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Muscular endurance and balance

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      Level surface

      DEMONSTRATION

      Watch Video
      HOW TO TRAIN
      FOR THIS EVENT?
      • Bent-Leg Raise

      • Leg Tuck and Twist

      • Side Bridge

    • TWO-MILE RUN (2MR)

      Run two miles for time on a measured, generally flat outdoor course.

      The 2MR assesses the Aerobic Endurance component of fitness. Higher aerobic endurance allows a Soldier to work for long periods of time and to recover more quickly when executing repetitive physical tasks.

      FITNESS COMPONENTS

      Aerobic endurance

      STANDARD EQUIPMENT

      Two mile run route on level field, track or running surface

      DEMONSTRATION

      Watch Video

    Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F)

    The Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) System is the Army’s primary investment in Soldier readiness and lethality, optimal physical and non-physical performance, reduced injury rates, improved rehabilitation after injury and increased overall effectiveness of the Total Army. The system empowers and equips Soldiers to take charge of their health, fitness and well-being in order to optimize individual performance, while preventing injury and disease.

    DOWNLOAD: FM 7-22: Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F)

    DOWNLOAD: FM 7-22: Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) Audiobook

    DOWNLOAD: ATP 7-22.01: H2F Testing

    DOWNLOAD: ATP 7-22.02: H2F Drills and Exercises

    DOWNLOAD: The H2F Operating Concept

    Holistic health and Fitness Logo

    RESOURCES

    Any comments or recommendations for improvement should be prepared using DA Form 2028 and sent to Director, Research and Analysis, United States Army Center for Initial Military Training, ATTN: ATMT-RA, 210 Dillon Circle, Fort Eustis, Virginia 23604-5701, or submit an electronic DA Form 2028 by email to: usarmy.jble.tradoc.list.g2-acft@mail.mil.