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Stand-To: Procedure prior to first light to enhance unit security, a daily compendium of news, information, and context for Army leaders.

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STAND-TO! Edition: Wednesday, November 28 2012

Today's Focus:

Doctrine 2015

Senior Leaders are Saying

It's miraculous for us to see how effective this process is. Soldiers deserve such care because of what they are doing for Americans now, and have been doing for more than 237 years.

- Under Secretary of the Army Joseph W. Westphal, praising the continuum of military medical care from combat zones, to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany, to long-term definitive care at stateside hospitals, such as Walter Reed, during a recent visit to service members in both Germany and Afghanistan.

Under Secretary visits Soldiers, Wounded Warriors in Afghanistan, Germany

What They're Saying

We have been building partnerships and we are increasing trust between them and us.

- Sgt. 1st Class Kevin Morgan, Djibouti Joint Civil Affairs Team sergeant, highlights the emerging of partnerships, friendships and a trust between Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa military members, the Djiboutian army members and the villagers of Karabti San, where the first permanent structure of an eco dome was built in collaboration.

Building eco dome brings villagers, service members together

A Culture of Engagement

Today's Focus

Doctrine 2015

What is it?

Doctrine 2015 creates a top-to-bottom hierarchy of publications, beginning with the top-level, easy-to-read doctrinal principles called Army Doctrine Publications, or ADPs. They are 10-15 pages long and easily accessible to Soldiers through technology. The lower level publications, called Army Techniques Publications, or ATPs, will likely change the fastest. The Army can update these more rapidly without having to change the whole body of information on a specific subject.

What has the Army done?

A 2009 doctrine conference recognized the Army had too many field manuals - about 550 - and it was time to look at how to best develop, update and deliver doctrine. U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command created a task force focused on making fewer doctrine publications that would be shorter, more collaborative and more accessible. Besides dramatically changing the doctrinal structure itself, the resulting Doctrine 2015 program leverages emerging technology to accelerate and modernize the entire doctrine development and delivery processes.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

Nearly all of the Army's ADPs and Army Doctrine Reference Publications, or ADRPs, were published Aug. 31, 2012. Field manuals will be published by Dec. 31, 2013. All remaining knowledge will transition to ATPs by Dec. 31, 2015. Through mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones, Soldiers can now access unrestricted, unlimited-distribution doctrinal publications without the use of a common access card directly from the Army Publishing Directorate's public website.

Doctrine's enduring value is truly realized only to the extent it is inculcated across the Army. The implementation plan guides the incorporation of Doctrine 2015 through education and training lanes, including conferences, curriculum, CTCs and warfighter exercises.

Why is this important to the Army?

Clear, concise, current and accessible are the trademarks of Doctrine 2015. The publication of the ADPs and ADRPs marked the first time all of the Army's senior manuals were released at nearly the same time, synchronized and integrated internally and linked to the same fundamental concepts in ADP 3-0, Unified Land Operations.

According to Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond T. Odierno - Doctrine 2015 is our way to directly shape what the doctrine process of the future will look like. This is the first comprehensive review of our doctrine structure that is based on the impact that an evolving operational environment and technological advances have in how we collect, display and disseminate information.

Resources:

Doctrine 2015
Combined Arms Center
Mission Command Center of Excellence
U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

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