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The United States Army

Stand-To: Procedure prior to first light to enhance unit security, a daily compendium of news, information, and context for Army leaders.

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STAND-TO! Edition: Wednesday, November 14 2012

Today's Focus:

Military Occupational Specialty Administrative Retention Review

Senior Leaders are Saying

No veteran should have to wait months or years for the benefits that you've earned, so we will continue to attack the claims backlog.

- President Barack Obama, reinforces the commitment to care for veterans, as more than a million warriors will transition back into civilian life over the next few years, at a wreath-laying ceremony to mark Veterans Day at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery, Va., Nov. 11, 2012.

President recognizes veterans' service, sacrifice

What They're Saying

Training like this is important because it best replicates the multinational environment in which our Soldiers will be operating downrange when serving in (the NATO International Security Assistance Force) or in other missions abroad.

- Maj. Mary Clare Mckenna, desk officer for Bulgaria, Romania, Kosovo and Hungary at U.S. Army Europe's (USAREUR's) Security Cooperation Division

U.S., Bulgarian forces train together during Allied Force 12

A Culture of Engagement

WHAT'S BEING SAID IN BLOGS

Today's Focus

Military Occupational Specialty Administrative Retention Review

What is it?

Military Occupational Specialty Administrative Retention Review (MAR2) is a commander's administrative screening tool to determine a Soldier's ability to perform his/her area of concentration (AOC)/Military Occupational Specialty (MOS). The MAR2 process determines if the Soldier will be retained in his/her current AOC/MOS, needs reclassification to another AOC/MOS, or referral to the Disability Evaluation System (DES).

Why is this important to the Army?

MAR2 will yield a cost avoidance of as much as $35 million a year due to reduced manpower costs for processing packets and conducting boards. MAR2 streamlines administrative processes across the Army aligns the regular Army (RA), Army National Guard (ARNG), and United States Army Reserve (USAR) processes. The MAR2 process ensures Soldiers and commanders get faster, consistent results. Additionally, commanders will have better visibility of Soldiers going through medical evaluation with the use of e-Profile and the MAR2 module.

What has the Army done?

On Aug. 1, 2010, the Army initiated MAR2 Pilot at four RA installations, four ARNG states, and two USAR Regional Support Commands (RSC). On Nov.1, 2011, the pilot was further expanded to include 18 active Army installations and the entire ARNG and USAR. The MAR2 process takes an average of 29 days for active Army, 16 days for ARNG and 19 days for USAR.

Under the MMRB process, it took an average of 70 days for active Army, 143 days for ARNG, and 100 days for USAR. The MAR2 pilot afforded the Army the opportunity to collect data to determine the impact on personnel resources prior to Army wide implementation this also allowed full integration of e-Profile and the MAR2 module for the regular Army and allowed time to make necessary changes in the final phase of data system integration.

What continued efforts does the Army have?

The Army will continue to improve, educate and monitor the MAR2 process to ensure it supports the Army's effort to maintain a Ready and Resilient All Volunteer Force. Army Regulation 600-60: Physical Performance Evaluation System (PDF), which held the MMRB process will be rescinded and MAR2 will be implemented in the next revision of Army Regulation 635-40: Physical Evaluation for Retention, Retirement, or Separation (PDF).

Resources:

Army Directive 2012-18: Military Occupational Specialty Administrative Retention Review (PDF)
ALARACT 261/2012: Notification of Army-wide implementation of MOS Administrative Retention Review (PDF)
Army Regulation 635-40: Physical Evaluation for Retention, Retirement, or Separation
Army G-1

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