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The United States Army

Stand-To: Procedure prior to first light to enhance unit security, a daily compendium of news, information, and context for Army leaders.

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STAND-TO! Edition: Tuesday, May 1 2012

Today's Focus:

Mental Health Awareness Month

Senior Leaders are Saying

These games embody the enduring resilience of our profession because your commitment to teamwork and determination and to persevere during these games, are the very same qualities that led you to serve your nation and make our military great.

-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, along with First Lady Michelle Obama, welcoming 200 wounded warriors from all branches of the military to the third annual Warrior Games April 30, at the Olympic Training Center, Colorado Springs, Colo.

First lady welcomes competitors to 2012 Warrior Games

What They're Saying

They've gone from having so much pain to realizing with a lot of training and help, they are able to get back to an active lifestyle. They don't give up.

- Carol Porter, alumni manager, Wounded Warrior Project, emphasizing the spirit of the wounded troops, who evolve and get better through physical activity.

Passion for cycling leads Kaiserslautern wounded warrior to compete

A Culture of Engagement

Calendar

150 Years: The Battle of Gettysburg: The American Civil War

May
National Mental Health Month- Related website: Army Medicine Behavioral Health
National Asian Pacific Heritage Month
Women's Health Care Month- Related website: Healthy Women
National Military Appreciation Month
Military Spouse Appreciation Day- Related website: Army.mil: Army Families

May 5 - 7: 5th Annual I. A.M. Strong Campaign Prevention Summit (Registration)

Today's Focus

Mental Health Awareness Month

What is it?

May is National Mental Health Month. Commanders and leaders across the Army are encouraged to use the month of May as an opportunity to educate Soldiers, Army civilians and family members about the Army's Behavioral Health (BH) resources and programs available on Army installations, military treatment facilities and within their local communities.

What has the Army done?

The Army offers an array of BH services in garrison and operational environments to address the strain on Soldiers and families who have experienced multiple deployments and other demands of military life. These services include theater combat and operational stress control, routine behavioral healthcare, periodic assessments, and suicide prevention programs. Chaplains, Military OneSource, and Family Morale Welfare Recreation Command also offer substantial support to Soldiers and families.

By establishing annual screening for all Soldiers, regardless of deployment status, through existing Periodic Health Assessments, the Army is exceeding the standard established by the National Defense Authorization Act for enhanced BH screening. These enhanced BH screenings help in the early identification of PTSD, major depression, family issues, and concerns related to overall BH.

In the past year, the Army implemented the Behavioral Health System of Care (BHSOC) Campaign Plan which is intended to further standardize and optimize the rich spectrum of Behavioral Health policies and procedures across the Medical Command. This will help to better identify, prevent, treat and track behavioral health issues for Soldiers and family members.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

In fiscal year 2012 (FY12), the Army is increasing BH teams assigned to all its brigade size operational units that will provide two BH providers and two BH technicians assigned to every Brigade Combat Team, Support Brigade and Sustainment Brigade in the active, reserve and National Guard Army inventory. This increase will be complete by FY17 and increase the total available uniformed BH force by more than 1,000 additional personnel.

Why is it important to the Army?

Stress and behavioral health support requirements are at an all time high for our Soldiers and their families. It is imperative that we do all we can to help our Soldiers and family members manage the normal stresses of combat and deployments - before, during and after. We must also maximize use of our behavioral health providers and strive to eliminate stigma for persons who seek or need behavioral health care.

Resources:

Army Medicine Behavioral Health
Military OneSource
Army OneSource
Family Morale Welfare Recreation Command
Army Chaplains

External Links Disclaimer - The appearance of hyperlinks to external sites does not constitute endorsement by the Department of the U.S. Army of the linked web site or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of the U.S. Army does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD web site.