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STAND-TO! Edition: Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Today's Focus:

The Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program’s Revised Training Curriculum

Senior Leaders are Saying

"Military spouses are abrupt and honest; they are the pulse of the community and will tell you the good and bad of what’s going on … we will always take care of our spouses and family. Because everyone knows we’re pretty darn special."

- Deanie Dempsey, wife of Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, while meeting with more than 20 Family Readiness Group leaders of the 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment and 172nd Infantry Brigade to discuss issues pertaining to the military family, keenly noted the concerns of the spouses.

Deanie Dempsey dishes with spouses

What They're Saying

"When you look to the side, it is all warriors. Everybody in that cemetery is a warrior, so it kind of kicks it home for you."

-Sgt. 1st Class Ronnie Vance, National Guard Bureau, compared running through the Arlington cemetery to a double-edged sword: on one hand the overwhelming feeling of sadness, but on the other, the chance to reflect on what you’re fighting for and see all those fallen warriors.

Army runs to celebrate birthday

Calendar

Today's Focus

The Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention Program’s Revised Training Curriculum

What is it?

The Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) revised training curriculum was created and implemented in alignment with the Army’s I.A.M. (Intervene, Act, Motivate) Strong campaign. The SHARP revised training curriculum promotes interaction between instructor and students; between performers and audiences using the latest educational and social-behavioral techniques. This method of training is done to enforce and reinforce social behavior norms that are in agreement with Army Values.

What has the Army done?

• Upon arriving at the reception station, Initial Military Training (IMT) recruits are introduced to the I. A.M. Strong campaign slogan signage.

• IMT trainees are introduced with the “Sex Rules” signs and posters conveying 10 sexual rules, which are aligned with Army core values; these rules are woven into real life situation scenarios and taught throughout the red, white and blue phases of the training cycle.

• IMT trainees also attend a live semi-impromptu interactive production called “Sex Signals;” performed by two actors. The production is live and interacts with the audience while performing spontaneous sketches about unacceptable sexual behaviors and norms, which can easily lead to sexual harassment and sexual assaults.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

A revised SHARP training curriculum has been developed for the Basic Officer Leadership Course (BOLC) A and B. BOLC A is the pre-commissioning training phase for aspiring future Army Officers of the Reserved Officer Training Corps (ROTC) on major college’s campuses; and BOLC B is the post-commissioning initial training phase for newly commissioned Army officers.

Why is this important to the Army?

The implementation of the SHARP revised training curriculum is important to achieve a cultural change that truly reflects Army values and foster an environment free from sexual harassment and sexual assault. The Army’s goal is to be the national model for sexual assault prevention. Because of our culture and values, the Army is an institution that can make great progress in this American societal problem.

Resources:

SHARP program

I.A.M. Strong: Stand with me, take action

SHARP gives tools to prevent sexual assault

Army Values

STAND-TO! NEWS

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Page last updated Tue June 21st, 2011 at 09:00