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STAND-TO! Edition: Monday, March 7, 2011

Today's Focus:

Women's History Month: "Celebrating the Strength of America's and the Army's Women"

SENIOR LEADERS ARE SAYING

"March is National Women's History Month- a time to celebrate the past, present and future accomplishments of women in service to our great nation. For over 235 years, women have valiantly served in our Army."

View the complete 2011 Senior Leader Celebrating Women's Contributions to the Army Message

WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

"The Army is focusing on reverting back to the right size. This is a process in which the Army emphasizes the alignment of forces to sustain its needs… We want to keep the best Soldiers in the Army."

- Sgt. 1st Class Kevin Thomas, a career counselor with USF-I retention office, referring to the various changes within the Army Retention Control Points program which will be encountered , effective June 1, by Soldiers serving on active duty, whether in the regular Army or Army Reserve and National Guard components.

Army stabilizes manpower, alters retention control points

A CULTURE OF ENGAGEMENT

CALENDAR

2010-2013: 60th Anniversary of the Korean War

2011: 150th Anniversary of the Civil War

March:

Women's History Month - Women in the US Army

Brain Injury Awareness Month - Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center

TODAY'S FOCUS

Women's History Month: "Celebrating the Strength of America's and the Army's Women"

What is it?

Women's History Month began March 1st and continues throughout the month. The national and Department of Defense theme is "Our History is Our Strength" and "Army Strong" has never been a more apropos motto when referring to our women warriors. They have been a major part of the Army’s history since its inception and we have continued to honor their service.

How important is this to the Army?

Female Soldiers play a vital role in today's Army. Leadership opportunities for women abound with female Soldiers serving in a variety of missions and in many different capacities. They are part of the Army team and Army family and are welcome and sought after for a variety of careers that offer personal and professional growth. Women, both uniformed and civilian, have served with distinction in every war this Nation has ever fought and continue to play a vital and crucial role. Their sacrifices, professionalism and bravery set and exceed the standard and underscore their dedication and willingness to share the responsibility of countering the enemy threat.

What is the Army doing?

The Army is hosting many diverse recognition ceremonies and symposiums including a Women's Army Service Pilots (WASP) Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony at the U.S. Capitol and the induction of the Hon. Tammy Duckworth and Brig. Gen. Wilma Vaught into the U.S. Army Women's Foundation's 2nd Annual Army Women in Transition Symposium Hall of Fame. In addition Command Sgt. Maj. Michele S. Jones, the first black female command sergeant major of the Army Reserve, is hosting a ribbon cutting ceremony for the new expansion of the US Army Women's Museum at Fort Lee, VA, showcasing two new exhibits: Army women stationed at Fort Lee, VA, and the role of female chaplains.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

Regardless of the myriad roles that Army women fill today, the Army remains in compliance with public law, Department of Defense policy and its own regulations regarding the assignment of female Soldiers. However, this month and always the Army will honor and recognize women Soldiers and civilians at all levels and in all capacities with events held at installations around the world. Local community participation both on and off the installations will also be held in the form of events, activities, speeches, lunches and symposiums.

References:

Women in the US Army

US Army Women's Museum

African Americans in the US Army: Profile of Command Sgt. Maj. Michele S. Jones

STAND-TO! NEWS

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