STAND TO!

Edition: Wed, July 16, 2008
Current Edition | FOCUS Submission Guidelines | Stand-To Fact Sheet | Printable Version

SENIOR LEADERS ARE SAYING

"The Army's unwavering commitment and a key element of our Warrior ethos is that we never leave a Soldier behind on the battlefield or lost in the bureaucracy."

- Surgeon General and Commander LTG Eric Schoomaker, U.S. Army Medical Command.

WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

"We want to grow scientists and engineers here in America. It's real important that we are creating future generations that are literate in science, math and technology because that's fundamental to our way of life."

- Dr. Michael Doyle, eCybermission program manager, informing students about programs the Army has to offer at a technology conference in Florida

Army showcases technologies at student conference

TODAY'S FOCUS

Ombudsman Program in Support of Warriors in Transition

What is it?

The U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Ombudsman Program is an avenue for warriors in transition and their Families to resolve issues, concerns and complaints arising during their transition process. MEDCOM established the Ombudsman Program in April 2007 and to date the program consists of 48 Ombudsmen located at 29 sites. Several sites will soon be added in Europe. Ombudsmen also provide services to remote sites as well as Community Based Health Care Organizations. Ombudsmen are located at Army military treatment facilities (MTFs) and serve as independent, impartial and confidential advocates between MEDCOM, the Soldier and their Families, and the MTF commander by acting as communicators, facilitators and problem solvers.

How do ombudsmen impact warriors in transition?

Since inception in April 2007, Ombudsmen have assisted nearly 7,000 WT and Family members. Ombudsmen resolve complaints, assist in obtaining accurate information and act as the advocate for warriors in transition and their Families who are faced with complex, often overwhelming issues such as their healthcare, pay, physical disability processing, reserve-component medical retention and transition to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

What types of problems do ombudsmen solve?

For example, the Family of one wounded Soldier requested he be transferred from Fort Hood, Texas, to Walter Reed Army Medical Center, which was closer to their home. Ombudsmen arranged the transfer and the Medical Command's Medical Assistance Group arranged for his mother to receive counseling. The mother of a Soldier with a back injury requested that he receive neurology care. Womack Army Medical Center worked with the Soldier and his Family to schedule a neurology appointment and an MRI scan while he was on leave from deployment in Afghanistan.

Why is this important to the Army?

Apart from war itself, the care of our warriors in transition and their Families is the top priority of the Army. The Ombudsman Program, along with the Wounded Soldier and Family Hotline (800-984-8523) are integral in bringing issues to the attention of Army leadership as well as identifying trends or patterns which must be addressed by senior leaders.

Resources:

Wounded Soldier and Family Hotline: 800-984-8523

Overseas DSN: 312-328-0002

Stateside DSN: 328-0002

Email: wsfsupport@conus.army.mil

INFORMATION YOU CAN USE

- 2008 Strategic Communication Guide - Read the 2008 Army Strategic Communication Guide for key messages and updates

- Strategic Communication Coordination Group (SCCG) Workspace

- Army Public Affairs Portal

- Stories of Valor

- Speaker's Toolkit

A CULTURE OF ENGAGEMENT

The Army Community Relations Calendar

Bloggers Roundtable

Army showcases technologies at student conference

Refurbished gym opens in Iraqi neighborhood

Coalition doctors remove tumor, save Afghan girl's life

CALENDAR

July 26, 2008: 60th Anniversary of the Integration of the Armed Forces

SOCIAL NETWORKING

NEWS ABOUT THE ARMY

WAR ON TERROR NEWS

OF INTEREST

WORLD VIEW

WHAT'S BEING SAID IN BLOGS