STAND TO!

Edition: Fri, July 11, 2008
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SENIOR LEADERS ARE SAYING

"Young servicemembers today are challenged with serving in one of the busiest periods of the U.S. military's history. ... Because of the high deployment tempo, it is important for troops to focus on leadership, mentoring and sharing their experience with new recruits. Even with the latest technologies and an ever-evolving arsenal, the individual servicemember still is the military's number one asset."

-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen, during a meeting with enlisted Soldiers in Mosul, Iraq

Mullen meets with enlisted troops in Mosul

TODAY'S FOCUS

Transfer of Authority - Multi-National Task Force East, Kosovo Force (KFOR)

What is it?

The transfer of authority between the KFOR 9 Multi-National Task Force East, led by members of 35th Infantry Division with Army National Guard forces from 23 states and two territories, and KFOR 10, led by the 110th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, occurred on July 10, 2008, at Camp Bondsteel. Multi-National Task Force East also includes units from Armenia, Greece, Lithuania, Poland, Romania and Ukraine.

What has the Army done?

The Army has been at the core of KFOR since its deploymentin the wake of the allied air campaign in June 1999. KFOR initially provided a deterrent to renewed hostility and threats against Kosovo by Serb and Yugoslav forces, established a secure environment and ensured public safety and order,demilitarized the Kosovo Liberation Army, supported the international humanitarian effort, and coordinated with and supported the international civil presence. The incumbent 35ID came to KFOR as no stranger to NATO operations, commanding Task Force Eagle of Multi-National Division North in Bosnia as part of Stabilization Force (SFOR) 13.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

KFOR has maintained security in support of broader international efforts in the region. The Army remains a vital force provider to support implementation of future security arrangements in Kosovo. As an essential element of KFOR, the Army's various components are postured for continued assistance aimed at the development of a stable, democratic, multiethnic and peaceful Kosovo.

Why is this important to the Army?

At a very complex and tenuous time following Kosovo's declaration of independence on February 17, 2008, the Army, in general, and the reserve component, in particular, have played a very active role in this critical international mission. Working alongside our allied partners,
reserve-component forces increase their interoperability for future coalition operations. In this era of persistent conflict, building tomorrow's coalitions is central to eventual victory in the war on terrorism. Through operational deployments like KFOR, our forces expand their tactics, techniques, and procedures as part of a multi-national force. This improves the combat readiness of our active and reserve component formations as they prepare for future deployments. Additionally, enduring projects and services that our rotational forces provide to the communities and citizens of Kosovo increase goodwill and promote stability in the region.

Resources:

NATO in Kosovo

KFOR 9 Web site

KFOR 10 Web site

USAREUR Web site

INFORMATION YOU CAN USE

- 2008 Strategic Communication Guide - Read the 2008 Army Strategic Communication Guide for key messages and updates

- Strategic Communication Coordination Group (SCCG) Workspace

- Army Public Affairs Portal

- Stories of Valor

- Speaker's Toolkit

A CULTURE OF ENGAGEMENT

The Army Community Relations Calendar

Bloggers Roundtable

Chemical defense collaboration protects nation

Baghdad pool reopens after refurbishment

CALENDAR

July 13, 2008: Army National Guard concert band performance

July 26, 2008: 60th Anniversary of the Integration of the Armed Forces

SOCIAL NETWORKING

NEWS ABOUT THE ARMY

WAR ON TERROR NEWS

OF INTEREST

WORLD VIEW

WHAT'S BEING SAID IN BLOGS