STAND TO!

Edition: Tue, March 11, 2008
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WHAT THEY'RE SAYING

"He had no way to protect himself and no way to defend himself. I had already promised him that we would take care of him. You just don't go back on a word like that. I knew that if I didn't get him, he would stay right there and die."

-Sgt. 1st Class Michael Loetz, who received a Bronze Star Medal for saving the life of an Afghan truck driver.

Soldier receives Bronze Star for heroic actions

TODAY'S FOCUS

Army transforms warrior care in less than a year

What is it?


The Army has transformed the way it provides care, services and support to all wounded, ill and injured Soldiers (warriors in transition), whether active, Reserve or National Guard. Our transitioning warriors required better attention and the Army Medical Action Plan (AMAP) began that transformation.

What has the Army done?

By December 2007, AMAP evolved to WCAT (Warrior Care and Transition), as the Army's unwavering commitment to never leave a Soldier on a battlefield...or lost in a bureaucracy.

- Each Soldier and Family now has a warrior transition unit (WTU), with a military squad leader, nurse case manager, and primary care manager (physician).

- Thirty-five warrior transition units, nine community based health care organizations, and 33 Soldier and Family assistance centers.

- Better facilities, and increased support with pay and benefits. Advocates: an ombudsman, the wounded Soldier and Family hotline: , and more care-givers assigned to WTUs.

- Mental health initiatives to treat PTSD and TBI injuries.

- Changed policy to give warriors and Families more comfort and convenience.

- Coordinated non-profit organization support to transitioning Soldiers and Families.

- Soldier Family management specialists for warriors with severe injuries, from the Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2), who coordinate benefits, services and other assistance programs, for as long as needed.

- Increased coordination among military and Veterans Affairs agencies, to share data and make more efficient the Soldier's transition to productive civilian life.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

The Office of Warrior Care and Transition will provide treatment through the Comprehensive Care Plan, healing the mind, body, heart and spirit with individualized attention to every part of the transitioning warrior's life. With a revised disability evaluation system, the Army and Veterans Affairs will continue to improve information sharing and case management for departing veterans.

Why is it important to the Army?

Warriors in transition are vital to the Army's mission capability. Sixty-five percent return to duty after they heal. This rate keeps the Army strong, by retaining the best-qualified, most experienced Soldiers. The Army will never leave a fallen comrade!

Army Medicine

INFORMATION YOU CAN USE

- 2007 Strategic Communication Guide - Read the 2007 Army Strategic Communication Guide for key messages and updates

- Strategic Communication Coordination Group (SCCG) Workspace

- Army Public Affairs Portal

- Stories of Valor

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WAR ON TERROR NEWS

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ARMY SPORTS

Martin, U.S. Army team battle through tough day in Atlanta