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Edition: Thu, December 27, 2007
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Community Based Health Care Organization (CBHCO) Program

What is it? The Army has a program called The Community Based Health Care Organization (CBHCO). This program allows a recuperating Reserve Component Soldier to obtain services from medical facilities near home, while remaining on active duty.

CBHCOs provide Reserve Component Warriors in Transition (WTs) high-quality health care and administrative processing through nine CBHCO units, managing more than 1,300 Soldiers, who live in all parts of the country.

Mobilized Army National Guard (ARNG) and Reserve Soldiers work within CBHCOs, exercising command and control (C2), and clinical oversight, for their component's WTs undergoing medical treatment, through Military or TRICARE network providers in their local area. Army Medical Command's four Regional Medical Commands manage the CBHCO program and the care WTs receive.

Experienced nurse case managers coordinate healthcare appointments, track WTs progress, and ensure care meets Army, and TRICARE, standards. More than 350 ARNG, and many AR Soldiers, are assigned as cadre in support of CBHCOs, alongside their fellow RC health care professionals.

What have the Army Reserve and the ARNG done? The Army Reserve and ARNG continue to support the CBHCO mission by mobilizing both C2 and Army Medical Department (AMEDD) personnel, from a number of states, to work with the CBHCO WTs. This support brings Reserve Component expertise to health care, and to the individual requirements faced by these WTs.

What continued efforts have the AR and ARNG planned for the future? The Army Reserve and the ARNG remain committed to supporting the medical needs of their Warriors in Transition and Families. The RC also will continue to extend services to deployed Soldiers' Families throughout the mobilization cycle.

Why is this important to the Army? Before CBHCO, injured or ill RC Soldiers who remained on active duty for treatment had to live at an Active Army installation. Not only did their numbers grow, challenging installation housing and medical capacities, Soldiers were away from their Families, units, and communities, while receiving medical care. The CBHCOs have given Warriors in Transition, and their Families, more opportunity to be close to one another, and to heal.

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