Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Ready and Resilient Campaign?

The campaign is a comprehensive plan to address the immediate and enduring needs of the Total Army including Active, Reserve, and National Guard Soldiers, Families, and Army Civilians. The campaign will instill a cultural change in the Army by directly linking personal resilience to readiness and emphasizing the responsibility of people at all levels to build and maintain resilience.

Why is the Army conducting this campaign?

The United States Army remains engaged in the longest period of combat operations in our Nation's history with an All Volunteer Force. The unprecedented length and the persistent nature of conflict during this period have tested the capabilities and fortitude of our Soldiers and the Army as an institution. The Ready and Resilient Campaign is designed to guide the Army's efforts in building and maintaining resilience across the Total Army (Soldiers, Army Civilians and Family Members), improving unit readiness and further reinforcing the Army Profession. The Ready and Resilient Campaign is comprehensive in addressing the immediate and enduring needs for Active, Reserve, and National Guard Soldiers, Army Civilians and our Families.

Will this campaign result in new programs?

Not initially. The programs and services aligned and synchronized in the campaign already exist. Later phases of the campaign will review the needs of the force to determine if existing programs and services continue to be effective. The Campaign is intended to leverage existing programs and assess and identify any gaps or redundancies. There are presently numerous support programs and services, some of which were established during this period of persistent conflict, available to assist Soldiers, Army Civilians and Family Members in coping with challenges and stresses. Some of these programs and services are designed to increase resilience and are preventive in nature, others focus on providing assistance and support in reaction to a particular incident or challenge. While much good has come from these efforts, they are not fully synchronized and their effectiveness is difficult to measure. The campaign also directs the refinement of the governance, policies, and coordination of proven programs and services to enable the chain of command to effectively promote readiness and resilience.

When will the Army see results of the campaign on suicide rates, sexual assault and hazing?

It is not possible to definitively state exactly when any new program or campaign will make an impact. Certainly our Soldiers, Civilians and Family Members deserve every effort we make to mitigate those stressors. The Army is dedicated to preventing suicides, sexual assaults and hazing and is constantly developing new methods to address those issues. It is vitally important we continue to review the Army programs supporting unit readiness and individual resilience as we seek to build, strengthen, maintain, and assess Total Army fitness, individual performance, and unit readiness.

Does this campaign indicate that the Army is not currently ready and resilient?

No. The Ready and Resilient Campaign is about strengthening resilience and improving the readiness of today's Soldiers, Army Civilians, and Family members and those who will follow them. The unprecedented length and the persistent nature of conflict over the past twelve years have tested the capabilities and the resilience of our Soldiers and the Army as an institution. The vast majority of our Active Duty, Army Guard and Reserve Soldiers have maintained resilience in this time of persistent conflict. However, the stresses of combat and strains from deployments have amplified lapses in standards and discipline among Soldiers and leaders at all levels, and contributed to the current negative trends in suicides, domestic violence, sexual harassment and assaults, drug and alcohol abuse, bullying and hazing.

Who is in charge of monitoring and reporting the results of the campaign?

The Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel -- the Army G-1 has staff responsibility for the Campaign, in coordination with the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management and The Surgeon General. Additional responsibilities will be levied upon ACOM, ASCC, DRU and Senior Commanders.

How long will this campaign last?

There is no end date. Improving the readiness and resilience of our Total Army is a priority and an enduring effort.

What is the goal of the campaign?

The Ready and Resilient Campaign is designed to guide the Army's efforts in building and maintaining resilience across the Total Force, thus improving unit readiness, and further reinforcing the Army Profession. The campaign requires collaboration, synchronization of efforts and command emphasis to accomplish its goals. There is also an implicit cultural change associated with the campaign that emphasizes the importance of resilience to our sustained readiness in the future. The Ready and Resilient Campaign shapes the Army by:

  • Changing the way the Army manages, organizes, and coordinates Army programs and services affecting Soldier, Family Member and Army Civilian resilience, beginning with the creation of a governance structure at the Headquarters Department of the Army-level down to installation/regional-level coordination councils that align efforts to deal with complex issues. This will improve the effectiveness of the programs and services and ensure comprehensive care (preventive and treatment) is available to the Total Force.
  • Incorporating resilience as a critical component in determining Soldier and unit readiness, emphasizing the importance of physical, psychological, and emotional factors in determining comprehensive fitness, and promoting a deliberate approach to building and sustaining resilience.
  • Emphasizing leadership responsibility at every echelon. Commanders are ultimately responsible for Soldier resilience and unit readiness. Leaders at all levels must understand that high standards of professionalism and discipline represent readiness within their formations. The campaign reinforces leadership at the first line supervisor-level. Leaders are empowered and enabled to enforce standards of professionalism and discipline, and they are held accountable for maintaining and improving resilience and readiness within their formations. Individuals must also be accountable for building and sustaining their personal resilience and readiness.
  • Finally, creating a common understanding of resilience and its benefits, as well as the mindset required to make resilience an enduring part of our professional culture. Ultimately, the goal is for our actions and deeds to speak louder than our words to our Soldiers, Families, Army Civilians, and external audiences.

What correlation is there between strengthening the Army Profession and this Ready and Resilient Campaign?

There is a direct connection. By strengthening Army Professionals we ensure that conditions are set for enhancing Soldier and unit readiness and resiliency. This campaign is vital to achieving continued success in current operations and meeting operational requirements in the future.

How much is this going to cost the Army?

The programs and services aligned and synchronized in the campaign are already funded. Some programs are funded through Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding and will require funding within the Army's base budget.

Why is Ready and Resilient important to the Army?

There are many reasons. For one, a healthy spirit, mind and body are essential to individual and unit readiness. For another, resilience is beneficial in combat, healing after injury, and in managing work and home life. That's because resilience generates optimal performance by combining mental, emotional, and physical skills. Further, resilient individuals are better able to bounce back and overcome adversity by leveraging these skills and by seeking out training. Additionally, individual resilience can be built, maintained, and strengthened through regular training. In turn, this strengthens the Total Army and provides strong individuals to communities when they return to civilian life.

How is the campaign different from what the Army has tried in the past?

Ready and Resilient empowers commanders to manage unit readiness and Soldier resilience; provides unity of effort across the Total Army; refines policies, prioritizes resources, effectively synchronizes and optimizes programs and services, focuses training, eliminates program redundancy, strengthens the Army profession, and creates an enduring cultural change in how the Army defines readiness and total fitness. This is achieved by incorporating resilience trends and analysis to be proactive versus reactive. This will change in the way the Army recruits, assesses, trains, and develops its Soldiers and Civilians in the future.

How does the Army define ready?

Readiness is the ability to accomplish assigned tasks or missions through resilience, individual and collective team training, and leadership. Readiness is the end result of the collective employment of the Army's resources to prepare, train, support and sustain its Soldiers, Civilians and Families.

How does the Army define resilience?

Resilience is the mental, physical, emotional, spiritual and behavioral ability to face and cope with adversity, adapt to change, recover, learn and grow from setbacks.

What is the connection between readiness and resilience?

Ready and Resilient individuals accomplish missions by combining mental, emotional, and physical skills to generate optimal performance (i.e. readiness) -- in combat, healing after injury, and in managing work and home life space. Ready and Resilient individuals are better able to bounce back and overcome adversity by leveraging mental, emotional, and physical skills and healthy behaviors by seeking out training or help. By strengthening themselves they strengthen the units to which they are assigned.

What does the Army hope to achieve with the campaign?

We will impact every part of quality of life with the Ready and Resilient Campaign. We will provide quality care for Soldiers equal to their service and sacrifice; reverse negative trends in suicides and sexual harassment/assault; eliminate bullying/hazing; reduce the population of non-deployable Soldiers; and make every Soldier "career ready" for Army and post-Army service. By strengthening the Army profession, improving unit readiness, and increasing Soldier resilience, the Army will continue to maintain the trust and confidence of our Soldiers, their Families, Army Civilians and the American people.

What is a Ready and Resilient Soldier?

Ready and Resilient Soldiers embrace the Army Profession. They are skilled professionals who live the Soldier's Creed and Army Values; take action when teammates struggle; are self-aware and seek help when needed.

What is a Ready and Resilient Leader?

Ready and Resilient Leaders embrace the Army Profession, know their Soldiers' needs and are involved in their lives beyond training and the battlefield. They take care of Soldiers entrusted to them, promote positive healthy behaviors, support those who need help and leverage all available Army tools to make the team stronger.

What is a Ready and Resilient Family?

Ready and Resilient Families are able to thrive and remain strong through deployments, reassignments and adversity. They support other families experiencing challenges, connect with their communities for support, make positive contributions to the success of loved ones, and understand that they are essential members of the Army Team.

What is a Ready and Resilient Civilian?

Ready and Resilient Civilians are skilled professionals who live by the Civilian Corps Creed and Army Values. They work with strong Army Soldiers to provide stability and continuity during war and peace and are valued Army Team members crucial to military operations.

What is a Ready and Resilient Unit?

Ready and Resilient Units are comprised of members who take care of one another, promote positive healthy behaviors, support those who need help and leverage all the tools the Army provides to make the team stronger. They are well-led and cohesive, with members proud to be part of the team.

Hotlines

Military Crisis Line (U.S.)
(800) 273-8255 (TALK)

Military Crisis Line (Europe)
00800-1273-8255

Safe Helpline - Sexual Assault Support for the DoD Community
(877) 995-5247
Text: 55-247 (inside the U.S.)
Text: 202-470-5546 (outside the U.S.)

Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE)
(866) 966-1020 - 24/7 Outreach

Vets4Warriors (855) 838-8255

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