Archive: AMCOM

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  • Animals Receive Annual Blessing At Chapel

    Oct 30, 2009

    Bicentennial Chapel celebrated its annual Blessing of the Animals on Oct. 3. The Blessing of the Animals has been celebrated at the chapel for more than 20 years.

  • Army always seeking improvements to combat uniform

    Oct 30, 2009

    Nothing says pride like a Soldier in uniform. Today's Soldier has much to be proud of in the current Army Combat Uniform, but the Army is always looking for way to make it better and more well-suited to the needs of the Soldier.

  • Scientists from India collaborate on Army energy challenges

    Oct 29, 2009

    Scientists, engineers and professors from the United States and India recently met to find ways to solve the critical power and energy challenges faced by both nations.

  • "Always a Soldier" program gets new manager

    Oct 29, 2009

    Debra Y. Coleman became the new program manager for the "Always a Soldier" program at headquarters, U.S. Army Materiel Command Oct. 26. Coleman was previously a staff action control officer at AMC.

  • Dynamics Of Working At Redstone Shared With Students

    Oct 28, 2009

    Redstone Arsenal's "wow" factor was on display Friday for about 120 college juniors and seniors interested in engineering, management information systems, accounting, finance, procurement, operations management, supply chain and enterprise resource planning. During College Day, the students toured the Prototype Integration Facility, Software Engineering Directorate, Redstone Test Center and the propulsion areas at Marshall Space Flight Center to get an idea of the projects they might work on as civilian employees for the Aviation and Missile Command or the other 50 federal agencies located on the Arsenal. "There are a significant number of job opportunities here and there's a lot of opportunity in the midst of the organizations moving here," AMCOM deputy commander Ronnie Chronister told the students. "What all this means is there will be opportunities for you and your peers for employment here." Speaking to the group at Heiser Hall at the beginning of their daylong visit, Chronister told the students that Redstone Arsenal can offer them a lot of hands-on opportunities to make a difference in the nation's overseas contingency operations and the day-to-day survival of Soldiers at war. The students saw some of the Arsenal's aircraft and missile systems perform in an AMCOM video, which included an Apache firing a Hellfire missile, a Black Hawk delivering a box of NLOS missiles to a remote location and a firing of a Patriot missile. "All the science and technology, the engineering, that went into building the Apache helicopter or Hellfire missile ... all the science and technology for aviation and missile systems is managed at this Arsenal," Chronister said.

  • Youngsters See Science and Math Hands-On

    Oct 28, 2009

    Pingpong balls and lava lamps brought the lessons of microgravity down to earth for sixth and seventh grade students who visited educator William Heard's mini-science lab at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center during the third annual Space and Missile Defense Student Day. "You guys ready to learn some cool stuff'" Heard asked students from Randolph School and Fairview Middle School. He asked the students if they knew about Daniel Bernoulli, a Swiss mathematician and scientist who lived in the 18th century and who is remembered for his applications of mathematical equations involving the flow of fluids in terms of speed, pressure and potential energy. Heard told them much of modern technology, especially aerodynamics, is based on Bernoulli's formulas. From the looks on the students' faces, the "stuff" didn't seem so cool anymore. "This guy was French. He lived in the 1700s. Way back then he was talking about some of the forces acting on nature, some of the things that are the principles of how airplanes actually work," Heard said, as he drove his message into the 21st century. "Bernoulli's Principle explains the lift and drag of airplanes, and the effect of air pressure. It's about microgravity." Then the "cool stuff" did happen. The students tried their own "lift and drag" experiment with two cups and a pingpong ball. The idea was to blow over the cup containing the ball so that the ball was pushed up and out of the cup, landing in the second cup. "By blowing over the cup, you are changing the air pressure inside the cup," Heard said. "Blowing across the cup generates a difference in the pressure in the cup and causes the ball to go from one area of high pressure to an area of low pressure." Heard also used 1960s lava lamp entertainment to further demonstrate the effect microgravity has on fluid. The demonstration was among eight exhibits from government and industry representatives that participated in the Space and Missile Defense Student Day at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center's Davidson Center. During the event, more than 250 middle school students from Huntsville, Madison, Decatur and Cullman participated in hands-on demonstrations in robotics, unmanned aerial/ground vehicle aircraft, satellite technology, man's quest to rediscover the moon, and other space and missile defense technologies.

  • Summit Unites State Military Leaders

    Oct 28, 2009

    Disaster contingency plans, antiterrorism and force protection programs, emergency drills and pandemic influenza plans were all on the table for discussion during an annual meeting that brought Alabama's commanders to Redstone Arsenal. The Alabama Commanders' Summit, started by Gov. Bob Riley, involves commanders from the state's three military installations - Redstone Arsenal, Fort Rucker and Maxwell Air Force Base - as well as state commanders and state emergency officials. "The vision of Governor Riley was to bring all of the state, federal and local emergency managers together so that we know each other, and we know each other's assets and capabilities," said Alvin Odoms, the Garrison's director of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security. "So, now, if we have to call on each other we know who can best help with the emergency that we are dealing with." This is Redstone's second time to host the event, which rotates between the state's three installations. "This is about preparing for a holistic state approach to an emergency or disaster," Odoms said. "Every post and military company in the state has capabilities and it's good to know what those capabilities are in time of need. Because of these summits, we know each other and we can work together as a team. We are part of each other's emergency teams."

  • National Committee Member Visits Base Supply Store

    Oct 23, 2009

    Redstone has its share of high-profile visitors. Last week a presidential appointee visited the post, but he wasn't here to see missile systems or aviation offices. He came to visit custodians, store clerks and sewing machine operators. James Omvig serves as the vice chairperson for the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. He was appointed to the committee in 2003 by former President George W. Bush. The independent federal agency oversees the AbilityOne program, which promotes business relationships for federal agencies with goods and services from blind or disabled people. He spent the morning of Oct. 13 touring facilities operated by the people his committee is charged to assist. "Mr. Omvig's visit is to thank AMCOM and the Huntsville federal community for 36 years of sterling support for the AbilityOne program," said Bryan Dodson, president and CEO for Phoenix Service. "Over the past 36 years, the combined support for AbilityOne in the Huntsville federal community has literally changed thousands of lives for person with disabilities served by Phoenix and the Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind who operate the base supply center."

  • Full Slate Of Activities Greets Military Wounded

    Oct 23, 2009

    Veterans Day activities will once again be the backdrop for a Tennessee Valley program that extends Southern hospitality to wounded Marines and Soldiers. The Semper Fi Community Task Force will host a group of 16 Marines and 16 Soldiers along with their spouses during Heroes' Week, which will include the Marine Corps Ball, a fishing tournament and boat tour, and the Veterans Day dinner and parade. All events are free for the wounded warriors and their spouses. "This is our way of helping, our way of paying it forward," said retired Marine Lt. Col. Mike Dahl, who is coordinating Heroes' Week. The task force has been raising funds throughout the year for this event. The group has also recruited various local businesses to donate services and products, and volunteers to assist with transportation and other arrangements. "We rely on a lot of local organizations to help us with this," Dahl said. Organizations such as the Patriot Guard, North Alabama Veterans and Fraternal Organization's Coalition, Redstone-Huntsville Chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army, Still Serving Veterans, Vettes for Vets Corvette Club, Blue Star Moms, Eagles Women's Auxiliary, Hands on Greater Huntsville, the cities of Huntsville, Madison, Decatur and Guntersville, and several local churches support Heroes' Week. Businesses such as Sierra Toyota, the Westin Hotel, Guntersville Yacht Club and Rocket Harley-Davidson are also providing support. "We want to show them that Huntsville and North Alabama is an awesome place. We support our troops and we accept people with open arms," said Reserve Gunnery Sgt. Joe Wittkop, a Heroes' Week volunteer.

  • Navy Reservist Returns Home After Year In Iraq

    Oct 23, 2009

    Well-wishers file into the conference room. There's cake on the table and a sign on the wall that says "Welcome home, Valerie." Co-workers celebrated Valerie Robinson's return from Iraq with a reception Thursday afternoon at the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center. The Navy reservist was deployed nearly a year in Al Asad, Iraq, with her unit, Navy Military Construction Battalion 24 out of Huntsville.

  • Protoype Integration Facility

    Oct 23, 2009

    Students from both public and private schools participating in the ninth annual Adventures in Engineering Day were brought by the busload Sept. 30 to tour the Prototype Integration Facility. Some of the attending high schools were Huntsville, Madison, Madison County, Limestone County and Arab. The AIE program allows students the chance to meet engineers who work on Redstone and to learn about their jobs firsthand. The Prototype Integration Facility welcomed the students and offered them the opportunity to see it and to speak with project leads. Once they reached the facility, the students were taken on a tour by government project lead TJ Lapointe who was eager to show and explain what he and other members of the PIF work force do. The bus with students from Bob Jones High was the first to arrive. The students piled in to the Visualization Laboratory where they squeezed between one another to get a better look at the large screens that gave examples of the 3D presentations being created there.

  • Military Families Have Voice At Local Schools

    Oct 23, 2009

    Barbara Williams spends much of her time attending meetings at school and talking with military parents. She doesn't mind her busy schedule; she just wishes more people knew she's available to help. "I still see people every day that say they don't know about school liaison services," she said. "I would say that's an area that needs improvement." Williams serves as youth education support services director/school liaison officer in Child Youth and School Services under the Garrison. She started in April after 32 years in the Huntsville city schools system. "The position that I'm in is very similar to my position in the Huntsville city schools district where I worked with families and children. I'm still working with families and children," said Williams, who formerly served as the director of pupil services at the city school board. "This one's different in that it's issues that concern schools and military children's education. My primary responsibility is of course military children's education." She has already seen the community's support for military children, whose mobile lifestyle entails frequent school changes. Under a new program this year called Military Operation School Supplies, 20 corporate sponsors provided 375 book bags filled with school supplies. The effort started in June and the book bags were distributed to military families in early August. "It was just an overwhelming project," Williams said. "They poured out a lot of support for our families."

  • Women's Group Steps Up Support In Defense Fields

    Oct 23, 2009

    Huntsville's leadership in the promotion of women in defense-related careers is a perfect fit for a city that is known for its "forward thinking," said a top Army official. "Since 1979, Women in Defense has provided members with forums for professional growth. Today there are 15 chapters for women who work in a primarily male industry and environment," said Brig. Gen. Susan Lawrence, commander of the Army's Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Signal Command. "Women in Defense has been adding chapters fast and furious in the last five to 10 years. A Huntsville chapter is only natural for the Huntsville area because it is one of the most forward thinking areas for its time." The Tennessee Valley Chapter of Women in Defense was started in March 2003. Speaking to an audience of about 250 members of the local WID chapter and the National Defense Industrial Association, Lawrence outlined Huntsville's history in the promotion of women in defense-related careers, beginning in the 1940s when women worked in the Army's local chemical and ammunition plants to replace the men who went to fight in World War II. "Their work helped their families financially and their performance was very much related to their own patriotic duty," Lawrence said. "Many of our predecessors recognized the challenges they faced and they all took on those challenges to make our nation a stronger place to live, to serve and to work." Lawrence said there is "no institution more supportive of women then the Department of Defense. It's been two decades since the Department of Defense first allowed women to go to service academies. Now we have 57 women generals or admirals. Five three-star female generals and, the great news last November, is we now have one female four-star. I've served with her and there is no better selection than General Ann Dunwoody."

  • Soldier deploys to Iraq to help field laser defense system for Chinook helicopters

    Oct 23, 2009

    Laser technology is taking Chief Warrant Officer Cary Nadeau to Iraq for his fourth deployment in support of overseas contingency operations. It's a deployment that will give Nadeau the opportunity to show the Army's Chinook pilots the benefits of new technology tested by the Redstone Test Center.

  • Growing Post Thanks Community

    Oct 23, 2009

    Community leaders from across the Tennessee Valley were given a "bird's eye view" of what growth means for Redstone Arsenal during a briefing from top Redstone officers Oct. 13. That view was an overarching look at the Arsenal's footprint, its growing capabilities and new organizations, and the issues that could threaten future growth. During the Evening at the Arsenal, Maj. Gen. Jim Myles, commander of Redstone Arsenal and the Aviation and Missile Command, joined forces with Col. Steve Kihara, the new commander of the Redstone Test Center, and Garrison commander Col. Bob Pastorelli to share Redstone Arsenal's story with more than 100 community leaders. The Arsenal story included a missile firing of the Javelin, a flyover of Chinook and Black Hawk helicopters, and dinner, exhibits and a presentation at the Redstone Test Center's hangar at the Airfield. "This is an Arsenal that supports the entire country ... The mission of success today is having you get a better feel for your Arsenal and having you get a better feel of what we're all about, what our challenges are and where we're at," Myles told his audience. "Welcome to your Army."

  • Inaugural U.S.-Indo Power & Energy Workshop a Success

    Oct 21, 2009

    Scientists, engineers and professors from the United States and India gathered to solve critical power and energy challenges facing both nations at the first U.S.-Indo Bilateral Power and Energy Workshop in Arlington, Va. Sept. 29 - Oct. 1. The three-day workshop provided a forum to identify collaborative research and development opportunities regarding power sources, power storage, cogeneration, and power management equipment and systems.

  • USASMDC/ARSTRAT employees support Special Olympics

    Oct 21, 2009

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. - Twenty-five employees and Family members from the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command volunteered to assist with the 42nd Special Olympics at Milton Frank Stadium here Oct. 20.

  • Army to delink distributed Learning from resident phase in Civilian Education System courses

    Oct 20, 2009

    Employees enrolling in a Civilian Education System course in the 3rd and 4th quarters of FY10 will notice a major change in the application process.

  • Central Michigan University offers credits for Civilian Education System course

    Oct 19, 2009

    Army Management Staff College has signed another articulation agreement, demonstrating university recognition of its Civilian Education System program.

  • Army Management Staff College reschedules Continuing Education for Senior Leaders class

    Oct 19, 2009

    The Army Management Staff College has rescheduled an upcoming Continuing Education for Senior Leaders class.

  • Aviation Program Exec Office Earns Acquisition Award

    Oct 16, 2009

    WASHINGTON - Teams and individuals from the Program Executive Office for Aviation were recognized in three out of 16 categories at the 2009 U.S. Army Acquisition annual awards ceremony Oct. 4 at the Crystal City Gateway Marriot. The ceremony paid tribute to the uniformed and civilian professionals who work tirelessly behind the scenes to provide combatant commanders and their Soldiers the weapons and equipment they need to execute decisive, full-spectrum operations in support of the overseas contingency operations. Some 139 nominations were received from the field. Only 18 were recognized. "Our people - military and civilians are our most important asset," said Dean Popps, acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology. "Tonight, we honor our finest - you." PEO Aviation was recognized in three categories for the Army Acquisition Excellence awards. The AAE recognizes an Army acquisition work force member or team whose performance and contributions set them apart from their peers. The nominees work at all levels of the acquisition community, from senior leadership to newly hired interns. Any Army acquisition work force member, team or joint program, active duty military, including reserve component Soldiers, and civilian employees, are eligible for award nomination. The awards directly reflect the outstanding achievements in support of the Soldiers and the Army's transformation efforts.

  • Annual Family Symposium Seeks Delegates

    Oct 16, 2009

    Nicki Swindle is looking for a few good volunteers. And you can be one of those volunteers if you have an association with the military and Redstone Arsenal; the desire to listen, question and follow through with quality of life issues as they are presented; the ability to work in a team to identify, develop and prioritize issues; and, above all, the commitment to making a difference in the lives of servicemembers, retirees, Army civilians and their family members. Oh, and one last requirement - you have to be able to participate in a two-day Team Redstone Army Family Action Plan conference set for Oct. 27-28 at the Officers and Civilians Club. "We need delegate volunteers," said Swindle, the quality of life program manager for Army Community Service. "We already have our facilitators, recorders, transcribers and issue support volunteers. But we need delegates with a variety of backgrounds and experiences. We need delegates that represent active duty, DA civilians, retirees, and active duty, retiree or DA civilian spouses." Thirty volunteer delegates are required by the conference. They are divided among three issue groups - medical/dental; benefits and entitlements, including traffic, transportation, personnel, finance and housing; and consumer services, including Commissary, PX and Family and Morale Welfare and Recreation activities. "The delegates do not have to be experts in these areas. We have subject matter experts that will provide them with the information they need to make decisions," Swindle said. Delegates work in their groups to review issues and brainstorm new issues, ask questions and conduct research involving subject matter experts, choose the group's top three issues, write issue statements and then present them at the end of the conference. "Everybody has a role in this process," Swindle said. "We want the delegates to feel comfortable enough to share their opinions. There are no uniforms, no ranks, no last names. Everyone is equal in this process. This conference gives people a voice, a way to get involved in change. But this isn't about personal agendas. We need delegates who want to see positive change come out of the process."

  • BALLOON SURVEILLANCE

    Oct 16, 2009

  • Furry Friend Makes Reading Time Fun

    Oct 16, 2009

    At first glance, Taka is a big dog. The German shepherd stands taller than many young children. But, after meeting him, it doesn't take long for Taka's gentle demeanor, high tolerance level and friendly nature to bring his stature down to a child's level, where he is petted, hugged and kissed, and read to. Read to' Taka is a registered therapy dog and a Reading Education Assistance Dog. He spends the first Saturday morning of each month practicing his listening skills with children who read to him at the Redstone Arsenal Library as part of the Tales with Taka program. At his side is his owner and trainer, Jamie Ward, who spends her working days as the acting chief of the acquisition management division, Lower Tier Project Office. "This is all fun for the children. It gets them comfortable around dogs and encourages them with their reading," Ward said. "It's a way for me to support the troops and their families." On a recent Saturday morning, Taka read books with two members of Taka's Pack Readers -- 9-year-old Sofia Rundini and 7-year-old Isabella Fratangelo. Both picked out books that they knew Taka would like.

  • Retirees Welcomed As Part Of The Arsenal Family

    Oct 16, 2009

    Besides information on health, benefits and local volunteer services, attendees of the two-day Military Retiree Appreciation Day at Redstone Arsenal also received an up-close look at the Arsenal and all it has to offer its Soldiers, civilian work force, retirees and their families. And much of that up-close look was provided by Garrison commander Col. Bob Pastorelli during an Oct. 3 presentation in Bob Jones Auditorium. "You are a part of our family," Pastorelli told the retirees. "This is an important event for us. I've been in the Army for 24 years, and as long as I've been in the service, no one does it better than Redstone Arsenal. "We're here to support you and we're going to do our best each and every time. We never forget about you even when you do retire. Our commitment is to provide you with whatever services we are capable of providing." Pastorelli thanked the event's coordinators - the Retiree Council of Redstone Arsenal - and all the organizations, including the Family and Morale Welfare and Recreation, Officers and Civilians Club, and Fox Army Health Center, that made the event possible. "Nothing gets done unless people lean forward, volunteer and make it so," he said. "(Co-chairmen) Henry Oldham and Doug Patrick and all their volunteers do phenomenal work every time." The colonel reviewed with retirees the size and economic impact of Redstone Arsenal - 38,125 acres; 12 million square feet of building space; $2.7 billion annual economic impact from salaries; 33,000-plus employees on Redstone Arsenal; 78,843 military retirees in the immediate area; 118,265 family members; and 55,303 civilian retirees.

  • I'm Not Stopping Serving No Matter What"

    Oct 16, 2009

    This year's Military Retiree Appreciation Day at Redstone Arsenal was all about life changes -- life changes that make a positive impact, that lead to reassessments and new commitments, that make a difference in the lives of others. Health care exhibitors including Fox Army Health Center, Huntsville Hospital and Crestwood Medical Center provided information about managing health issues, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Volunteer agencies like Still Serving Veterans and Army Community Service offered both services and volunteer opportunities. And program speakers urged attendees to make the most of their retirement years. The two-day event gave retirees a glimpse of the life changes they can make in their own lives and in the lives of others. Leading those life changes was one of the Army's most active military retirees - Jack Tilley, who prefers to be introduced as the former - not the retired - 12th sergeant major of the Army. Tilley brought his message of life changes to the second day of the annual Military Retiree Appreciation Day event, held Oct. 2 at the Officers and Civilians Club and Oct. 3 at the Sparkman Center's Bob Jones Auditorium and cafeteria. His message - interspersed with personal antidotes - told of his deep faith in God, his belief that the U.S. still stands for hope, peace and equality throughout the world, and his willingness to continue in his service to the nation despite carrying the label "retired." "My name is Jack Tilley. I'm a retiree. I'm a Soldier. And I will never stop serving," he told retirees in closing his presentation on Oct. 3. But before the closing came so much more.

  • NCO Academy Aces Organizational Day

    Oct 16, 2009

    It all came down to this last test of strength and will. Two Soldiers, a male and female, from Headquarters & Headquarters Company and the NCO Academy squared off to determine who would walk away with the 59th Ordnance Brigade Organizational Day 2009 trophy. When the dust cleared from the rapid succession of pushups, the Academy stood alone. Oct. 2 had provided individual and team heroics as Bravo, Charlie, Headquarters & Alpha, the Marines, HHC 59th and NCO Academy gathered for a fun-filled day of activities to build morale within the companies. HHC 59th and the Academy ended the final event of the day, the tug-o-war, tied for first place and then squared off in the tiebreaking event, the pushup. But the true feat was two companies with the oldest Soldiers in the unit beat out more than 400 privates, with the average age of 20. HHC 59th and the Academy both proved age doesn't matter. "You know, it's kind of hard for the NCOA to compete because we have older Soldiers," 1st Sgt. John Butler, senior leaders course branch chief, said. "Some have injuries, some don't run like they used too. But we came out and competed really well against companies like Bravo and Charlie, who have fresh, young Soldiers. For us to come out on top, this was great. It says a lot for our Soldiers in the NCOA." And this victory for the Academy was indeed important. Though the Academy has dominated when it comes to static display contests, they are not known for their athletic achievements. "This victory is special to us," Butler said. "For the last few years, the NCOA was getting beat pretty bad in these (competitions). It's nice to come out on top."

  • Readiness Group Reaches Out To Team Redstone

    Oct 16, 2009

    Unlike predominately-military installations, Redstone deploys both Soldiers and civilians. It's looking to support them through a non-traditional readiness group. "The concept is new in that our demographic is unique here," said Kathleen Riester, Army Community Service program manager and FRG representative. At other installations, troops deploy as a unit. A traditional family readiness group is in place at their post to meet the needs and answer the questions of their families for the duration of their deployment. At Redstone, however, civilians and Soldiers deploy throughout the year - sometimes individually or in small groups for varying time periods. A traditional readiness group just wouldn't work for them. "That's why our name is the 'Community Family Readiness Group,'" Riester said. "Because we're trying to cover all of our people under this one umbrella. Even if you're an office of only five and you have no one deployed right now, you may have someone deployed in the future. You're welcome to the table." Last year the Community FRG formed to try and meet the needs of Team Redstone, both Soldier and civilian, as they deploy. Along the way, they have identified issues unique to civilian deployments.

  • Milestone Run At Army Ten-Miler

    Oct 16, 2009

    WASHINGTON - After all the congratulations for finishing first for the third straight year, the news got even better for members of Redstone's Army Ten-Miler team. The runners learned they had won two first-place awards for the first time in Redstone Arsenal's history of competing in the 25th annual event. Redstone finished first in the government agency division for the third year in a row at the 10-mile race held Oct. 4 near the Pentagon. Redstone also had an entry in the all-comers division. Preliminary results announced at the awards ceremony had Redstone Two finishing second among the all-comers. However, the official results on the Army Ten-Miler website subsequently had Redstone Two finishing first in that division as well. So, Redstone Arsenal swept both the government agency and all-comers divisions for the first time. The Army Ten-Miler office was notified of its earlier discrepancy and promised to settle the matter by Oct. 15.

  • Command confronts challenges in filling contracting positions

    Oct 15, 2009

    Although the nation is experiencing unemployment levels not seen in decades, Army Contracting Command continues to face a challenge when it comes to recruiting qualified contracting specialists at the mid and senior levels.

  • The backbone

    Oct 15, 2009

  • Security awareness - Understanding foreign disclosure

    Oct 15, 2009

  • Commentary: Ditch that handshake for a smart salute

    Oct 15, 2009

  • Corps of Engineers pays first expanded Homeowners Assistance Program claim

    Oct 14, 2009

    Air Force major receives first check under HAP program enhanced by the Recovery Act ....

  • SMDC participates in Army 10-Miler

    Oct 14, 2009

    On the morning of Sunday, Oct. 4, more than 30,000 military and civilian runners gathered at the Pentagon to participate in the 25th Annual Army 10-Miler. USASMDC/ARSTRAT participated with two teams as well as individual racers. The race starts and finishes at the Pentagon, passing Washington, D.C., landmarks including the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument and the Capitol Building. The event is produced by the U.S. Army Military District of Washington and precedes the AUSA National Conference in Washington, D.C., annually.

  • 2009 Redstone Rocket issues

    Oct 13, 2009

  • AMCOM/Redstone Arsenal Public and Congressional Affairs

    Oct 13, 2009

  • Ceremony officially recognizes organization's operational status

    Oct 8, 2009

    The Army celebrated the official full operational capability status of the Army Contracting Command and its subordinate commands with a ceremony on the Army Materiel Command Parade Ground, Fort Belvoir, Va. Created after the need for a dedicated Army contracting command was identified in the 2007 independent report, Aca,!A"Commission on Army Acquisition and Program Management In Expeditionary Operations,Aca,!A? also known as the Gansler Commission Report, ACC, AMCAca,!a,,cs newest major subordinate command, brought contracting capabilities from existing Army organizations into a new structure that focuses on professional, ethical, efficient and responsive contracting operations.

  • Commentary: Coping strategies for workplace survivor syndrome

    Oct 8, 2009

  • Commentary: Being prepared

    Oct 8, 2009

  • Commissioning of the USS New York Nov. 7

    Oct 8, 2009

  • Mathisen conquers the Northeast Maryland Triathlon

    Oct 8, 2009

  • Environmental Team Cleaning Up Past Mistakes

    Oct 7, 2009

    Corroded air filters and disintegrated pieces of gas masks mar the natural beauty of a once popular fishing and swimming hole on Redstone Arsenal. But it's not what's above the water in the quarry at the corner of Neal and Mills roads that worries environmentalists Terry de la Paz and Wes Smith. It's what's underneath. An underwater video camera has revealed chemical drums and ordnance on the floor of the quarry pond. What the camera doesn't reveal is if those chemical drums actually hold substances that could damage the environment. "It will cost four to five million dollars to get the drums and ordnance out of the water and to clean up the site," de la Paz said. "But if there is a chemical warfare agent in those drums that we have to dispose of, then we will have to figure out how to destroy them and that will cost a lot more. "The problem is we don't know and it's a big risk. We have to plan on the drums having chemicals in them until such time as we can prove there's not." Redstone Arsenal is one of the Army's top three installations for the number of contaminated sites that have to be restored based on the regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency and the State of Alabama Department of Environmental Management.

  • NCO Academy Gives Local Youngsters Lesson Of Hope

    Oct 7, 2009

    What started out for the Soldiers of the NCO Academy as a simple afternoon of fund-raising became a lesson of hope and inspiration to a group of children at the Harvest Youth Club. A few weeks ago, many NCO Academy Soldiers spent their weekend washing cars to help raise money for the club. On Sept. 17 the same Soldiers had the chance to visit the children. The Academy raised $600; and the club will use the money to pave the back lot behind the club's main building. The paved area will give many of the children the chance to play games and learn how to ride bicycles, according to executive director Melvin Allen. He said the money raised by the Academy will be matched by Old Navy, bringing the total to $1,200. Once the Soldiers arrived at the club, the children were called to their assigned rows and stood at attention. They preformed military facing movements and then sat quietly. The Soldiers were impressed by the well-disciplined children. But the visit wasn't for the Academy Soldiers to brag about their accomplishments; it was to meet with the kids and give some guidance toward school, teamwork and life. "It's important to be here. We need to let these kids know that school is extremely important," said Sgt. Nicolette Pringle, 114th Signal Battalion, who is a student at the Academy.

  • Ordnance School Prepares For Move

    Oct 7, 2009

    Moving is a way of life for any Army family. But these days, moving from one post to another has taken on a whole new dimension for Col. Lee Merritt and his command staff at the 59th Ordnance Brigade/Ordnance Munitions and Electronics Maintenance School. While the brigade's move to the Missile and Munitions Center at Fort Lee, Va., is still more than a year away, the spring of 2011 looms large on Merritt's radar as he reviews plans to move office and classroom furniture, training and simulation equipment, and instructional supplies as well as staff and students - all while still maintaining the educational and training experiences provided by OMEMS. "Our first goal is to continue to provide quality training with feedback from the field. We want to train Soldiers so they will be prepared to hit their unit on day one of a deployment and fight and win our nation's battles," said Merritt, who will be the last commander of the 59th/OMEMS at Redstone Arsenal. "At the same time, we need to be preparing to execute BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommendations) and move to Fort Lee. We will have lots of great facilities there that will give us more capability because they are built to meet our needs at today's standards. And, third, we need to take care of our people, both civilian and military, primarily because of BRAC. Anytime you have such a large organization move it impacts a lot of folks." There are about 1,100 military and civilian personnel from the 59th/OMEMS who conduct and support training in 39 military occupational specialties in the areas of munitions management, explosive ordnance disposal, electronic and missile maintenance, and test measurement and diagnostic equipment arenas. Each year, the staff at Redstone trains about 6,000 Soldiers, who are assigned to the 832nd Ordnance Battalion. Since its inception in 1952, OMEMS has graduated more than 190,000 students.

  • Ordnance Museum move - The remains

    Oct 7, 2009

  • Photocopying military, CAC IDs a violation of federal law

    Oct 7, 2009

  • Workers Urged To Step Up To The Plate To Help Others

    Oct 5, 2009

    He inherited fame from his father, but he makes his own legacy by helping others. Roberto Clemente Jr., son of a major league baseball legend, gave a pep talk to an estimated 350 people during Team Redstone's Hispanic American Heritage Month event Sept. 23 in Bob Jones Auditorium. "My father left a fingerprint in baseball and the whole world," he said. "When I leave this world, I want to say I left a fingerprint in a positive way." Clemente Jr.'s fingerprint has included founding the Reviving Baseball in the Inner Cities or RBI program, aimed at helping at-risk youth through the sport in San Juan. He also established the Roberto Clemente Foundation benefiting children in the Pittsburgh community. In 2002, Clemente Jr. was named honorary chairman for the baseball assistance team annual fund-raising dinner. He is also known for his work with the American Diabetes Association.

  • Spotlight On Aviation Technology For Ground Support

    Oct 5, 2009

    The Army's aviation maintenance equipment is only as good as the Soldiers who use it to repair and maintain helicopters and fixed wing aircraft. So, it's not surprising that a four-day conference - the Aviation Ground Support Equipment User Conference - included plenty of opportunities for Soldiers to provide feedback on the aviation ground equipment they use in the field, and to learn about new and improved equipment designed to make their job more efficient and responsive in support of aviation missions in both peaceful and wartime environments. The conference, hosted by the product management office of Aviation Ground Support Equipment, brought about 300 Soldiers and Army civilians together with 50 vendors to the Von Braun Center Sept. 20-24 to discuss everything from maintenance software systems to battle damage assessment repair kits. The conference included presentations by PM AGSE and various other product management and project management offices related to AGSE. "PM AGSE is listening to what the Soldiers need," said Lt. Col. Russ Wygal, the AGSE product manager. "We're trying to be responsive to what the Soldiers need in the field. We want them to know that the input and feedback we've gotten from them in the past is actually benefitting them now in the products we are providing. "We listen. We take that information and we implement it to support the Soldier. We are all about making sure we support the Soldiers who are supporting aviation maintenance, and we are doing that with the right tools at the right time at the right place."

  • Unmanned Aircraft Systems Team Opens Site In Utah

    Oct 5, 2009

    The Unmanned Aircraft Systems Project Office on Sept. 23 officially opened its Rapid Integration and Acceptance Center at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, consolidating the testing of UAS payloads and technologies to allow for faster deployment to war fighters. Brig. Gen. Tim Crosby, program executive officer for aviation, paralleled the new RIAC operation with the Pony Express operations that took place across the neighboring Utah desert in 1860 and 1861. "In the same pioneering spirit those passionate and dedicated riders served their country, we serve our country and our war fighters today. The RIAC will allow us to serve our Soldiers faster," he said. Col. Greg Gonzalez, project manager for Unmanned Aircraft Systems, also acknowledged service to the war fighter, noting that it is the Soldiers in combat who give his office its orders.

  • Global communications equipment moves closer to battle deployment

    Oct 2, 2009

  • Students Learn about Potential Careers through Adventures in Engineering Day

    Oct 2, 2009

    On Wednesday, Sept. 30, more than 200 high school students visited the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command (SMDC/ARSTRAT) as part of the 9th Annual Adventures in Engineering Day.

  • AMC to showcase improvements in logistics and acquisition at AUSA annual meeting

    Oct 2, 2009

    The U.S. Army Materiel Command will showcase a wide variety of advancements and emerging technologies in logistics and acquisition at the Association of the U.S. Army's annual meeting and exposition at the Washington Convention Center Oct. 5-7.

  • Battling The Threat Of Domestic Abuse

    Oct 2, 2009

    The troops are massing to battle a societal disease that affects millions of families all across the nation - and Madison County and Redstone Arsenal are among the entities on the front lines. October is Domestic Abuse Prevention Month in the Army (nationally recognized as Domestic Abuse Awareness Month). In support of the recognition, Redstone Arsenal's Army Community Service is involved in a month of programs both on post and throughout the community to bring awareness to the growing problem of domestic violence. The programs are being coordinated by the Madison County Community Response Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Task Force. "We are involved with the Madison County task force against domestic violence and sexual abuse because our people - Soldiers, civilians, retirees and their families - live both on and off post," said Virginia Dempsey, family advocacy program manager for ACS. "It is an issue when anyone is being harmed, whether it's the Soldier or a family member. We are here to provide services for the victim and services for the whole family." The Army's theme for Domestic Abuse Prevention Month is "Make the Right Choice! Act to Prevent Domestic Abuse."

  • ARRA: Defense Department announces Housing Assistance Program details

    Oct 2, 2009

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers manages the Housing Assistance Program, with $555 million boost from American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

  • Invasion of Troy, Operation Diomedes

    Oct 2, 2009

    The 5th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade set up a forward area rearming and refueling point at a local farm in Troy, Tenn. Sept. 30 during Operation Diomedes, an Air Assault exercise offering Soldiers from the 5-101 and 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team the opportunity to train in unfamiliar terrain. PHOTOS BY SADIE E. BLEISTEIN

  • Operation Diomedes in Troy

    Oct 2, 2009

    The 5th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade set up a forward area rearming and refueling point at a local farm in Troy, Tenn. Sept. 30 during Operation Diomedes, an Air Assault exercise offering Soldiers from the 5-101 and 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team the opportunity to train in unfamiliar terrain. PHOTOS BY SADIE E. BLEISTEIN

  • Operation Diomedes Air Assault Exercise, Troy, Tenn.

    Oct 2, 2009

    The 5th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade set up a forward area rearming and refueling point at a local farm in Troy, Tenn. Sept. 30 during Operation Diomedes, an Air Assault exercise offering Soldiers from the 5-101 and 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team the opportunity to train in unfamiliar terrain. PHOTOS BY SADIE E. BLEISTEIN

  • TP4 - another way to 'keep it moving'

    Oct 1, 2009

    Facing what Lt. Gen. James H. Pillsbury, Army Materiel Command deputy commanding general, called a tsunami of equipment to be returned to the United States, the 2nd Battalion, 402nd Army Field Support Brigade is doubling its capacity to return some high-priority equipment in a quick and cost effective manner to the warfighter faster.

  • Comprehensive Soldier Fitness: Strong Minds, Strong Bodies

    Oct 1, 2009

    Today, Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh announced the formal beginning of an Army-wide implementation of a $125 million program focused on enhancing the performance and improving the overall strength and resilience of Soldiers, Family members, and Army civilians. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) is a holistic fitness program offering mental and physical resilience assessments and training that increase physical, emotional, social, spiritual and family strengths.

  • Peer to Peer encourages Soldiers to 'make a movie, save a life'

    Oct 1, 2009

    2nd annual competition features $2000 prize FORT RUCKER, Ala. (Oct. 1, 2009) Aca,!" The U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center is calling all Soldiers to put their best safety stories on camera for the chance to win $2,000 as part of the 2nd Annual Peer to Peer Safety Video Competition.

  • USACR/Safety Center launches Fall/Winter Safety Campaign

    Oct 1, 2009

    The 2009 U.S. Army Fall and Winter Safety Campaign reaffirms the Army's commitment to protecting our Band of Brothers and Sisters by urging all Soldiers, Civilians and Family members to prepare for cold weather activities through awareness, education and information.

  • AMC honored in Value Engineering

    Oct 1, 2009

    FORT BELVOIR, Va. -- The U.S. Army Material Command and U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Life Cycle Management Command were honored for being exceptional examples of value engineering by SAVE International during a Congressional Education reception Sept. 17.

  • Mannheim clinic hosts first health fair, rededicates facility after million-dollar renovation

    Sep 30, 2009

    The Coleman Barracks Health and Dental Clinic held its first ever health fair Sept. 25 at its newly renovated facility in Mannheim, Germany.

  • Worker Finds Creative Niche With Hobby

    Sep 25, 2009

    David Wilson had been looking for a creative outlet for many years. He had tried different hobbies, but nothing stuck. Four years ago, however, he found his art form inside a chunk of wood. He's been carving ever since. "I had a friend that was a carver. He gave me a tool catalogue and told me to order a few things. He said he would teach me a few things in a week or so. But then he took a job as a tour bus driver," Wilson, a property administrator in the Garrison's Directorate of Logistics maintenance division, said. "It was three years before I saw him again. So, I got a few books and kept practicing. Other carvers have helped me and showed me things along the way." After four years, Wilson said he is still a beginner. His carving is still a learning process of trial and error. "I make toys, animals and people," he said, laughing. "I also make some firewood, too." It is a process he has come to love. He has set up a small shop at his home, where he spends hours in the relaxing pursuit of taking tool to wood. He has found that he most enjoys crafting caricatures and faces. "I can't even draw a stick figure, but I can take a piece of wood and make something," he said. "It's relaxing and satisfying at the same time."

  • Community Entertains Families From Fort Campbell

    Sep 25, 2009

    "OMG!" said Denise Lewis upon seeing the crowd gathered in the lobby of the Embassy Suites Hotel. More than 250 family members, Team Redstone leaders, community leaders and representatives from various support organizations were assembled. They met in a reception room for a "Welcome to Huntsville" event Sept. 12. With their spouses deployed in Afghanistan for a year, the family members of the 159th Combat Aviation Brigade from Fort Campbell, Ky., were ready for a relaxing time - a retreat from the stress of running a family, working jobs, being involved in the community, and the day-to-day household operation without the presence of their spouses. The group is part of Strong Bonds, formerly known as the Building Strong and Ready Family program in 1997, an Army family readiness/support group led by the 159th Chaplain unit. The program recognizes the importance of family support. "We are so happy to be here," said Lewis, family readiness group brigade adviser

  • Security Assistance Command Tackles Suicide Prevention

    Sep 25, 2009

    The Army has made suicide prevention among Soldiers a top priority. However, predominantly civilian organizations are using the training and information available to educate their work forces as well. The Army Security Assistance Command is moving into phase three of its training plan. "We want it to be understood that we take it just as seriously as the green-suiters," Gale Fenwick, training manager, said. "We are an Army organization and suicide does happen to civilians, too." The first phase of training included briefings and presentations featuring the stories of people who have lived through suicide attempts or the pain of a friend, loved one or colleague's death. Some of the faces are instantly recognizable. "The actor and comedian Drew Carey has a segment where he talks about his own suicide attempt," Fenwick said. The training program is mandatory for USASAC's active duty and government civilian work force. It is also recommended for the contractors within their walls. Conducting widespread training at four locations, while in the middle of a BRAC move, sounds daunting, Fenwick said. However, teamwork and support from Redstone has made it go much smoother than could be anticipated.

  • 'God Is Touching The Hearts Of So Many'

    Sep 25, 2009

    While the Army defends freedoms around the world, God is working in the hearts of people from all walks of life who hunger for justice, compassion and a promise for a better future. That's what Betsy Brown is witnessing as she travels throughout western and eastern Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. "Pray for our enemies," she urged members of the Protestant Women of the Chapel during a presentation Sept. 10. "God is touching the hearts of so many who hate us. In Africa, Morocco, Libya, Algeria and all over the world, Jesus is making himself known ... Pray that they have dreams and visions, because they are." Brown, an international Christian worship leader, speaker and teacher, formed Heartsong Ministries in 1979. Since then, she has traveled throughout the U.S. and the world to share the message of Christ and to minister to U.S. servicemembers. In her mission work, she ministered behind the Iron Curtain in Germany when communism was falling, among Russian military in Siberia, and on the battlefields of Iraq to both U.S. military and Iraqi citizens. She has co-led prayer walks on the islands of Indonesia, assisted with tsunami relief work in Indonesia in 2005, spent Christmas 2004 and Thanksgiving 2007 in Iraq ministering to U.S. military, traveled to Syria several times to assist with aid to more than 2 million Iraqi refugees, and taught and worshipped with military wives involved in PWOC around the world. She has seen for herself how the power of Jesus and the Christian message of love and forgiveness have changed the lives of radical extremists. As she spoke to PWOC members in Bicentennial Chapel, Brown said she has repeatedly heard testimonials similar to what a refugee living in a Palestinian Refugee Camp in Lebanon once told her about his transformation.

  • West Point Senior Ready To Graduate Into Service

    Sep 25, 2009

    Matthew Wilson didn't know his dad during his Army years. By the time the younger Wilson was born, John Wilson was getting ready to retire from a 22-year stint as an Army officer. But growing up in a post-Army family hasn't kept Wilson from finding his own way into the military's officer ranks. "I still feel like I've grown up in an Army family. I knew my father had served and so had my grandfather. It was something I knew I was always going to do." Wilson has begun his senior year at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. His graduation with a bachelor's in electrical engineering in May 2010 will be the culmination of a goal he set after attending West Point's Summer Leaders Seminar following his junior year at Grissom High. "I attended the leadership courses at West Point and the Naval Academy," Wilson said. "The programs are meant to expose students to the rigors, to the reality of the military academy. "I really liked the atmosphere at West Point. I made good friends during that week who I am still in touch with. I had a great squad leader. I liked everything about it." It didn't take long for Wilson to realize that West Point was the place for him. And, as he decided his path, Wilson's parents dedicated themselves to providing support to their son and other Alabama West Point cadets. They have both served as the president of the West Point Parents Club of Alabama, and continue to assist with club activities.

  • Fox's Retiring Spokesman Enjoys 'Blessed Time'

    Sep 25, 2009

    Fifty-mile drives and new computer technology were the challenges that Melba Moody faced when she first reported for work Sept. 20, 1989 at what is now Fox Army Health Center. That was 20 years ago and Fox was a full-blown hospital, with an emergency room, surgical facilities and hospital rooms. Moody's plan was to work for the hospital for a year or two and then return to her family farm in Lawrence County. Those plans changed. "I've spent so much time here that this is like family," she said. But another part of her family - her husband, a daughter and son and their spouses, 10 grandchildren and a host of other relatives - are pulling more strongly than her Fox family these days, and Moody has decided it's time to retire. A retirement reception in her honor is scheduled for Thursday from noon to 2 p.m. at Fox. "I'm excited. I'm anxious. I'm going to miss the people here terribly," she said. "When I first started, I had been driving for about a month and I thought to myself 'I don't know if I can do this for a year.' Now I don't think anything about the drive. I have loved working at Fox. I love the people, the patients, and I have loved my work. I didn't know it was going to be so rewarding."

  • Touching Lives Of Veterans With Caring Services

    Sep 25, 2009

    Helping veterans is a community-wide effort in Huntsville. And, among the organizations that assist veterans, Still Serving Veterans has made a niche for itself by providing "the caring and understanding counseling" sought by veterans of all ages who need help in reintegrating into their communities. "Support from the community is what really makes us successful," SSV executive director Werner Baker said. "Huntsville is such a great military community and Redstone is really a great post. Funding is critical to our programs. But we've been fortunate that Huntsville is a giving community. We have wonderful support." That support is much appreciated by SSV as it works to make each veteran, and especially each wounded warrior, successful at what often becomes the most difficult task in their return to civilian society - finding a way to support their families. "We take care of all veterans. But our main emphasis is on young wounded warriors. We do not turn any veteran away who walks in our door. We provide all of them with job development and job training, and we work closely with their families. It doesn't do just to help the veteran and let the family walk out the door without that same support. We are all about helping to keep these families together." Baker said the Huntsville community - including commercial establishments, government contractors and individuals - has come forward to provide financial support for SSV services and programs during its three years of operations. Fund-raising events, such as the upcoming golf tournament sponsored in support of SSV by Analytical Services on Oct. 2 at Cherokee Ridge Golf Course, make a difference in the type of support SSV can provide.

  • Madison County Honors Veteran Heroes

    Sep 25, 2009

  • Setting Example of Supporting Troops

    Sep 25, 2009

    When Rick Turner retires in November from his position as executive director of the Test Measurement and Diagnostic Equipment Activity, he will be taking with him a reputation of excellence and commitment built during 33 years of civilian service. It is a reputation that will be recognized nationwide at the Association of the U.S. Army annual meeting and exposition in October when Turner is presented with the annual Department of the Army Civilian of the Year Award for outstanding service to the Army, its Soldiers, civilians and families. "I view this award as recognition of the Army value of selfless service. This award is recognition for the USATA team and the other folks at Redstone who support us," Turner said. "We have 61 different locations in 11 countries, in 26 states and on three different continents. We have great Americans working for us. They are truly supporting our customers, and I have the honor of representing them. This is a team of professionals - 90 percent of which are former Soldiers - who don't care who gets the credit as long as Soldiers get the support they need. That's what makes it easy to come to work every day." Similar to others who have received prestigious Army awards, Turner said he is "humbled" and "honored" to be chosen for the AUSA award from among thousands of dedicated DA civilians, and considers it a "great honor" to be recognized for the work that's being done by USATA employees in support of Soldiers "who raise their right hand to defend our nation and, possibly, give their life for it." He also sees the award as an opportunity to promote the work of USATA's 600 employees.

  • U.S. Army sponsors first HIV vaccine trial to show some effectiveness in preventing HIV

    Sep 24, 2009

    A Phase III clinical trial involving more than 16,000 adult volunteers in Thailand has demonstrated that an investigational HIV vaccine regimen was safe and modestly effective in preventing HIV infection. According to final results released by the trial sponsor, the U.S. Army Surgeon General, the prime boost combination of ALVACR HIV and AIDSVAXR B/E lowered the rate of HIV infection by 31.2% compared with placebo.

  • Interactive Training for Property Accountability

    Sep 23, 2009

    Discover information on distance learning (DL) courses and links to websites where Soldiers can take or order property accountability courses online.

  • Petraeus draws 'big picture' for Soldiers at Infantry conference

    Sep 23, 2009

    At the Infantry Warfighting Conference Tuesday, Gen. David Petraeus walked nearly 2,000 Soldiers through "the big picture," in respect to counterinsurgency operations in the region that constitutes the United States Central Command, the smallest but most volatile of the six U.S. geographic combatant commands.

  • AMC Equal Opportunity/ Equal Employment Opportunity Roundtable

    Sep 22, 2009

    REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. -- The U.S. Army Materiel Command held the annual AMC Equal Opportunity/ Equal Employment Opportunity roundtable here Sept. 15-17.

  • Maj. Gen. James E. Rogers

    Sep 18, 2009

    Major General James E. Rogers Commander U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Life Cycle Command Redstone Arsenal, Ala.

  • Post Office Officially Arrives In New Home

    Sep 18, 2009

    The new location for the Post Office has gotten its official sendoff. Newly-renovated building 3710 is now the home of the U.S. Post Office and the Official Mail and Distribution Center. The renovation effort was a jointly funded project between the Garrison, the Army Materiel Command and the Missile Defense Agency. "We're very proud a team approach, a vision, could put this all together," Garrison commander Col. Bob Pastorelli said at the Sept. 9 ribbon-cutting ceremony. Workers from headquarters Army Materiel Command and the Missile Defense Agency are arriving at Redstone from the Washington, D.C. area through base realignment and closure.

  • Reserve Officer Finds His Field of Dreams

    Sep 18, 2009

    There's a yellow post-it note above Capt. Rob Dewberry's door that reads "What if' ..." It's been there since he first took over as the commander of the Garrison's Headquarters & Headquarters Company in 2004, becoming the first Reserve officer in the Army to command an active duty unit on an active duty post. Now, as Dewberry retires his position, the post-it note will come down and the new commander - Capt. Ryan Godbee - will set his own agenda and objectives for his command. But for Dewberry, that "What if' ..." post-it was a constant reminder to question all aspects of a situation, to look "outside the box" for solutions, and to find new and more effective ways to support Soldiers. "That's my own personal motto," Dewberry said. "It's about doing better, trying something new, and finding ways to help people. Being able to help people is an incredible feeling."

  • AMCOM Embraces Social Media Venues

    Sep 18, 2009

    The Aviation and Missile Command can now be found on two popular social media sites, Facebook and Twitter. "Social media is the most effective and least expensive tool to reach the largest audience possible," Ginger Stephens, AMCOM chief of Public and Congressional Affairs, said. "It allows us to quickly and efficiently update our troops, work force, and the general public on what's going on at the Aviation and Missile Command. It also serves as a great recruiting tool, showing the younger generation that the Army is up on the current trends and actually ahead of the curve." AMCOM's mission is quite simple: to get the Soldier what they need, before they need it, in order to do their job. This includes the fielding and sustainment of new or upgraded weapons and aviation platforms. "We recognize the importance of engaging on social media platforms, such as those where AMCOM is engaged," Lt. Col. Kevin Arata, chief of the newly established Army Public Affairs Online and Social Media Division, said. "This is how and where our audience gets much of their news."

  • Meet the Redstone Arsenal Ten-Miler Team Runners

    Sep 18, 2009

    Here are individual profiles of the runners who will represent Redstone Arsenal at the 25th annual Army Ten-Miler on Oct. 4 in Washington, D.C.

  • Today's Soldiers Honor Yesterday's Heroes

    Sep 18, 2009

    When you drive the streets of Huntsville at 4 a.m., you're not going to see much. You'll pass closed buildings, dark streets, and you won't find many citizens wondering around. But as you pull into the Huntsville International Airport, you'll find Soldiers standing with members of the Patriot Guard, holding giant American flags, waiting for some special guest to arrive. Who's the special guest, you might ask' Is it a general' How about a music singer coming to play a concert for the Soldiers' None of the above. These Soldiers and civilians of Huntsville, Madison and Redstone Arsenal are waiting for members of the greatest generation - World War II veterans coming to the airport to participate in an Honor Flight, a trip to see the WW II memorial in Washington, D.C. This edition of the Honor Flight took place Aug. 29. "The Honor Flight is an organization where (they) solicit donations from various corporations and private and public donations, all to fly these World War II veterans and volunteers to Washington, D.C., so these vets can see their memorial and remember those who died serving our country," said Sgt. 1st Class Scott Fuchs, senior small group leader for the Basic NCO Course, 59th Ordnance Brigade.

  • Oktoberfest Weekend Arrives With 'Oompah'

    Sep 18, 2009

    The Chicken Dance is once again coming to Redstone Arsenal! By far one of the favorite traditions of the Arsenal's annual Oktoberfest, the Chicken Dance will be performed often this weekend by Terry Cavanaugh and the Alpine Express as revelers of all ages take to the dance floor in the event's FestHall Tent. If you like authentic "Oompah!" music, and German food and beer, then Oktoberfest should be at the top of your list of things to do this weekend. But partaking of German fare and customs isn't the only thing going on at the festival. Oktoberfest is also a must-do for anyone who enjoys midway rides and games, carnival food, and circus entertainment. "It's Oktoberfest with an Alabama flair," said Mark Germonprez, of the Directorate of Family and Morale Welfare and Recreation, who is a co-event coordinator of the festival with FMWR's Kenneth McDonald. "Oktoberfest always offers a tremendous value and great family fun. We offer a much more secure environment, unlimited rides, great entertainment, and this festival costs half the price of the county fair we had here a few weeks ago. We also offer more than any other fair with our Oompah band, great German food and authentic German beers." Festival hours are 5 to 11 p.m. Thursday, 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, noon to 1 a.m. Saturday, and 1 to 8 p.m. Sunday. Ticket prices are $10 on Thursday and Sunday, and $13 on Friday and Saturday.

  • Charity Drive Grows To Meet Needs

    Sep 18, 2009

    The stack of boxes is about to grow at the office of the Tennessee Valley's Combined Federal Campaign. They contain individual donor recognition items for the upcoming campaign. Soon they will be joined by 22,000 copies of the CFC brochures listing the charities. "And then you'll see another stack up to the ceiling over here," said Melinda Seigler, CFC coordinator for United Way of Madison County which is the campaign's principal combined fund organization. CFC coordinator Donna Johnson doesn't mind making room in building 3708 at the corner of Aerobee and Patton roads. She's fired up about the 2009 campaign scheduled Sept. 30 through Dec. 11. "Now more than ever there are a lot of people in our community and our nation and our world that need our support," Johnson said. The theme for this year's campaign, which has a $2 million goal, is "iCan now more than ever." The kickoff celebration is Sept. 30 from 10-11 a.m. in Bob Jones Auditorium, building 5304. The agency fair will be held 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Sparkman Center parade field between buildings 5303 and 5304.

  • Flying History Grounded At McKinley Firing Range

    Sep 18, 2009

    There's a lot of flying history on McKinley Range. Amid the helicopters and an A-10 Thunderbolt airplane set up on the range for force training is an OV-1 Mohawk, a photo observation and electronic reconnaissance airplane used by the Army in Europe, Korea, the Vietnam War, Central and South America, Alaska, and Operation Desert Storm. It is a military aircraft that is at the center of the 20th reunion of the OV-Mohawk Association Sept. 23-27 in Nashville. Yet, the actual physical presence of a Mohawk on Redstone Arsenal was an interesting discovery for a former Mohawk pilot and technical observer who recently visited McKinley Range to see the military aircraft for themselves. "Ten years ago, a friend (now deceased Mohawk pilot Mike Langer) told me a Mohawk had come to Redstone Arsenal at some time," said David Brown, a retired master sergeant and Mohawk technical observer. "The Veterans Memorial Museum showed me pictures of the airplane out at Redstone Arsenal. So, I knew it was on the Arsenal. I just didn't know where it was."

  • 'We've Found Ways To Channel Our Grief'

    Sep 18, 2009

    He asked for understanding and patience. He apologized for his tissue and prepared speech, both tools he uses to help hold back his own tears. And he touched the hearts of the 650-plus employees who heard his message of sorrow, loss, bewilderment, faith, hope and love. Maj. Gen. Mark Graham, deputy chief of staff of the G-3/5/7 at Forces Command, Fort McPherson, Ga., told his heartbreaking story of the death of his two sons - one from suicide, the other from an improvised explosive device in Iraq - to a packed Bob Jones Auditorium and to other Redstone Arsenal employees via closed circuit television Thursday. The event was hosted by the Garrison's Employee Assistance Program in recognition of National Suicide Prevention Week and National Suicide Prevention Month. "I can hardly get through this and I've done this many times," he said of his speech. "Two of my sons are dead and it is hard for me ... My sons died fighting different battles. The loss of both sons was beyond comprehension."

  • U.S. Army Recognizes Top Ten Greatest Inventions of 2008

    Sep 18, 2009

    FORT BELVOIR, Va. -- U.S. Army Materiel Command Commander Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Commander Maj. Gen. Paul S. Izzo, and other senior Army science and technology leaders will recognize the U.S. Army's "Top Ten Greatest Inventions of 2008" in an awards ceremony September 21 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, Arlington, Va.

  • Hawaii Military Working Dog Team Named "Top Dog" in Competition

    Sep 16, 2009

    After three days of fierce competition, a Hawaii-based working dog team outscored the competition and was named "Top Dog" in the 2009 Hawaiian Islands Working Dog Competition. Staff Sgt. Marcus Bates and his working dog, Bennie, 13th Military Police Detachment, 728th MP Battalion, had the best overall performance among all the working dog teams and took home the top trophy. Approximately 30 teams from the Army, Air Force, Marines, Honolulu Police Department (HPD) and the Transportation Security Administration all gathered early in the week for a chance at the title of "Top Dog". During the competition, the dogs detected narcotics in a warehouse, ran through obstacle courses, and competed in a hardest-hitting dog competition to take down hostile personnel.

  • ADMC destroys Army's last DRAGON missiles

    Sep 16, 2009

    ANNISTON ARMY DEPOT, Ala.--The Army finished demilitarizing all the Dragon missiles in its stockpile on Sept. 8 when Anniston Defense Munitions Center blasted the last 24 with 36 M15 mines in an open burn/open detonation process.

  • DoD SPOT Program, Winner of the 2009 Identity Deployment of the Year Award

    Sep 16, 2009

    The Synchronized Pre-deployment and Operational Tracker, by the U.S. Department of Defense, won a 2009 Identity Deployment of the Year Award at the CSO magazine's Digital ID World conference in Las Vegas, Nev., Sept. 15, along with six other applications.

  • Security Assistance Command plants its flag

    Sep 16, 2009

    Quoting words of freedom spoken by President John Kennedy, the new commander of the Army Security Assistance Command said the nation's sacrifices during the past eight years have proven that Americans stand for freedom throughout the world.

  • USASAC Assumption of Command

    Sep 11, 2009

    The U.S. Army Security Assistance Command's assumption of command ceremony took place at the Bob Jones Auditorium, Redstone Arsenal, Sept. 11. Gen. Ann E. Dunwoody, commanding general of Army Materiel Command, hosted the ceremony. Brig. Gen. Christopher Tucker assumed command from Richard G. Alpaugh, executive director, who will now serve as Tucker's deputy. By the end of fiscal year 2009, USASAC will have all eligible personnel and functions moved to Redstone Arsenal - a full two years ahead of the BRAC requirement.

  • Metering program helps Army reduce energy costs

    Sep 11, 2009

    Sometimes saving energy can come from doing something as simple as installing a meter.

  • Cargo Helicopter Upgraded Ahead Of Schedule

    Sep 11, 2009

    The Prototype Integration Facility has celebrated the completion of its latest modification to the CH-47F helicopter with a recognition ceremony for the team. Installation of the Infrared Suppression System was supposed to take six weeks but the PIF completed it in just three. Lt. Col. Brad Killen, product manager for the CH-47F, came out to honor the team for installing the modifications so quickly. "We took time to come out today to recognize the guys from the PIF because they were able to install modifications on the CH-47F helicopter under-schedule, nearly three weeks under-schedule, which was a great asset to us in the PM office. It speaks highly of what the PIF is doing," Killen said.

  • FFID Soldier saves fellow Soldiers life

    Sep 11, 2009

    BGen. Keith Walker, Director of the Future Force Integration Directorate presents Spc Ramona Dunlap with an Army Commendation Medal for her actions in preventing a fellow soldier from taking their own life.

  • TOW System Upgrade Goes To Troops In Afghanistan

    Sep 11, 2009

    A team from Close Combat Weapons Systems Project Office has returned from Afghanistan after a mission to field the latest capabilities to war fighters using Tube-launched Optically tracked Wire-to-command missiles. The team delivered Improved Target Acquisition Systems that incorporate Far Target Location capability that allows gunners to determine accurately the position of enemy threats well beyond traditional engagement ranges. The ITAS Far Target Locator Fielding Team consisted of Maj. James Stepien, APM, ITAS fielding for the TOW weapon support division, Close Combat Weapons Systems, PEO Missiles and Space; Jason Morris, government engineer; Greg Mattson, contractor logistician; and Kevin Beck, a Raytheon field service representative. The team spent nearly two-and-a-half months in theater from January to March, including a two-week reconnaissance trip in December.

  • Youth Center Gets Youthful Appearance

    Sep 11, 2009

    Nothing beats a fresh coat of paint to instantly refresh a room. Thanks to Home Depot and the hard work of volunteers, the Youth Center looks youthful and fresh. Stephanie Stone at Directorate of Family and Morale Welfare and Recreation got the call from Home Depot. Their service crew, Team Depot, was looking for a community project to do and they really wanted to make it happen on Redstone. "Linda Ares from Team Depot came to me and asked if FMWR had any community projects they could do at no cost to us," Stone said "I put the word out to let everyone know we had this great offer. We got a lot of ideas from all the activities." The Youth Center was ultimately chosen. Even though new furniture and equipment had been bought for the facility, the old paint made it feel dated, Stone said.

  • Garrison Steps Up To Support Arsenal Community

    Sep 11, 2009

    The Garrison Town Hall on Sept. 3 at Heiser Hall started and ended right where it should - with its mission and programs. Garrison commander Col. Bob Pastorelli reviewed with employees the Garrison slogan -- "Support First ... People Always!" -- in his opening comments about the Garrison's impact at Redstone Arsenal. That slogan reflects the Garrison's mission to provide high quality, effective and efficient installation operations support and quality of life programs for Team Redstone. "Our mission and vision ('Be what right looks like for a U.S. Army Garrison') talks to you as an organization, as to who you are," he said. "A lot of key things that go on around the Arsenal are because of the Garrison." The Garrison consists of 600 civilian and more than 1,500 contractor employees who work every day to ensure installation operational readiness, provide high-quality safety, security and quality of life services, and plan for and implement long-term growth and stability strategies. "Everybody does a great job every day," Pastorelli said of his Garrison work force.

  • Ten-Miler Team Seeks Championship Three-Peat

    Sep 11, 2009

    Redstone is sending an experienced running team to defend its title in this year's Army Ten-Miler. The two-time defending champion in the government agency division, Redstone will compete in the 25th annual race Oct. 4 in Washington, D.C. Most of its runners are back from last year. "I believe this year's team will do quite well in the field of runners they'll be running against," coach Harry Hobbs, professor of military science at Columbia High and a retired chief warrant officer 5, said. "I'm proud that our team represents the full Army team - which consists of active Army, DA civilians and contractors. That's why we run in the government agency division. I feel that our premier runner, David Riddle, will lead us to a championship again in the government agency division."

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