Fort Bragg resilience fair offers resources for Soldiers
Spc. Patricia Huckoby, right, of the Warrior Transition Battalion, Co. C, speaks with Sgt. Neal Wiser, XVIII Airborne Corps, during the Community Resilience Fair, March 12, held in the Soldier Support Center. The fair provided resilience resources for servicemembers, Families and civilians.

FORT BRAGG, N.C. - At 20 years old, Spc. Patricia Huckoby had a stroke. A picture of health at 110 pounds and 5 feet 4 inches, Huckoby said she had always been in good health, but was diagnosed with a rare, genetic disease that cause recurring strokes.

Now assigned to Co. C of the Warrior Transition Battalion, the Virginia-native, made her way to the Soldier Support Center, March 12, to take part in a Community Resilience Fair stood up by the XVIII Airborne Corps Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Program.

The fair offered resilience resources for servicemembers, Families and civilians.

Defined as the ability to recover from adversity, resilience is a cornerstone of Soldier wellness.

Some of the representatives at the fair included the Army Substance Abuse Program, Strong Bonds, Financial Readiness, Suicide Prevention and Sexual Harassment and Rape Prevention.

"I hope that the people attending the fair will learn about some of the benefits and resources available to them at Fort Bragg in their time of need," said Staff Sgt. Shareese L. Blakley, XVIII Abn. Corps master resilience training representative.

Huckoby said she learned about the fair from her non-commissioned officer, Sgt. 1st Class Warren Feaster, who encouraged her to attend.

"My mom died when I was a kid, so I've had no choice but to be optimistic," said Huckoby. "But, hopefully, I find something new to learn."

Resilience training is beneficial for Soldiers because it offers a set of skills that are taught at the company level to help Soldiers deal with everyday adversities, said Sgt. Neal Wiser, XVIII Abn. Corps. The training is not only for Soldiers, but is also available to Family members through Army Community Service, he added.

Dee Ann Rader, a MRT at ACS, manned a craft table at the fair, offering activities such as flower building and making sand art.

"This is an opportunity for people to stop thinking about worries -- just focus on something fun," Rader said.

The Community Resilience Fair will be held quarterly and will provide the opportunity for Soldiers to have pertinent questions answered and to receive information about available resources on Fort Bragg that helps build resilience.

For more information about resilience, visit http://csf2.army.mil/.

Page last updated Fri March 22nd, 2013 at 00:00