• Soldiers in 304th Expeditionary Battalion conduct preventive maintance checks and services on their vehicles at Camp Humprehys, South Korea, Feb. 21, 2013. About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary Battalion finished relocating from Camp Stanley to Camp Humphreys as part of the 2004 Land Partnership Program agreement between the United States and Republic of Korea governments in February.

    preventive maintance checks and services

    Soldiers in 304th Expeditionary Battalion conduct preventive maintance checks and services on their vehicles at Camp Humprehys, South Korea, Feb. 21, 2013. About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary Battalion finished relocating from Camp Stanley to...

  • 304th Expeditionary Battalion's recently moved into their new eight-story barracks at Camp Humphreys, South Korea. About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary Battalion finished relocating from Camp Stanley to Camp Humphreys as part of the 2004 Land Partnership Program agreement between the United States and Republic of Korea governments in February.

    new barracks

    304th Expeditionary Battalion's recently moved into their new eight-story barracks at Camp Humphreys, South Korea. About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary Battalion finished relocating from Camp Stanley to Camp Humphreys as part of the 2004 Land...

  • Lt. Gen. John D. Johnson, commander of Eight Army, listens to Lt. Col. Mark S. Parker, commander of 304th Expeditionary Battalion, during a brief on 304th ESB's tactical network exercise, Feb. 21, 2013. About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary Battalion finished relocating from Camp Stanley to Camp Humphreys as part of the 2004 Land Partnership Program agreement between the United States and Republic of Korea governments in February. The tactical network exercise was 304th ESB's first exercise since moving to Camp Humphreys.

    tactical network exercise

    Lt. Gen. John D. Johnson, commander of Eight Army, listens to Lt. Col. Mark S. Parker, commander of 304th Expeditionary Battalion, during a brief on 304th ESB's tactical network exercise, Feb. 21, 2013. About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary...

CAMP HUMPHREYS, South Korea (Feb. 27, 2013) -- About 300 Soldiers from 304th Expeditionary Battalion finished relocating from Camp Stanley to Camp Humphreys as part of the 2004 Land Partnership Program agreement between the United States and Republic of Korea governments in February.

The move is considered a vast improvement by Soldiers in all ranks.

"All our companies have the same foot print (building layout)," said Command Sgt. Maj. William J. Jordan, 304th ESB's senior enlisted Soldier. "They are all centrally located next to the motor pool, which makes it easier for Soldiers to go to the barracks, motor pool and company headquarters."

The new work and living spaces for 304th ESB were recently built. Camp Humphreys has a larger selection of base facilities and American style restaurants for Soldiers.

"I can now get a five-layer burrito from Taco Bell," said Pfc. Christopher England, Headquarters and Headquarters Company. "Taco Bell is by far the best part of this move (Camp Stanley did not have a Taco Bell)."

However, most Soldiers feel the barracks are the biggest perk of the move. The eight-story barracks have the feel of a modern apartment building.

"Our barracks are really nice," said Pfc. Jonathan Muzsi, Alpha Company, 304th ESB. "I have my own room and share a kitchen with a roommate."

Junior enlisted Soldiers in 304th ESB each have their own room. They share a common area, bathroom and a mini kitchen (refrigerator, microwave, stove and oven).

"We also have really nice gym facilities here also," said Muzsi, a native of Vernon, Conn.

The facilities have boosted the morale of 304th ESB, according to Jordan.

"This place is going to be an awesome place to be stationed at once they finish everything," said Jordan, from Aynor, South Carolina.

In the next few years almost all of Area I (North of the Han River), inducing 2nd Infantry Division, will relocate to Camp Humphreys, explained Maj. John Sanders, 304th ESB executive officer.

However, 304th ESB currently doesn't have any neighbors.

"You see all that farm land out there," Sanders said pointing. "They have already started building. Soon other units will move in as buildings are finished."

304th ESB has found the move has created some unique challenges.

"Our biggest challenge now is not breaking warranties on the new facilities," said Jordan.

In the upcoming months Soldiers in 304th ESB will be adjusting to the new environment and training on their equipment.

"I'm also looking forward to building relationships and friendships in the local Korean community," said Jordan.

Page last updated Mon March 4th, 2013 at 00:19