• Calvin O. Cobbs, chief of Plant Operations and Sanitation Branch explains the water filtration process to Seoul American Elementary School fourth grade students, Nov. 13. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Han Samuel)

    SAES students visit water treatment plant

    Calvin O. Cobbs, chief of Plant Operations and Sanitation Branch explains the water filtration process to Seoul American Elementary School fourth grade students, Nov. 13. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Han Samuel)

  • Calvin O. Cobbs, chief of Plant Operations and Sanitation Branch shows the periodic table of elements to Seoul American Elementary School fourth grade students, Nov. 13. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Han Samuel)

    SAES students visit water treatment plant

    Calvin O. Cobbs, chief of Plant Operations and Sanitation Branch shows the periodic table of elements to Seoul American Elementary School fourth grade students, Nov. 13. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Han Samuel)

  • Seoul American Elementary School fourth grade students tour the U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan water treatment plant, Nov. 13. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Han Samuel)

    SAES students visit water treatment plant

    Seoul American Elementary School fourth grade students tour the U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan water treatment plant, Nov. 13. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Han Samuel)

YONGSAN GARRISON, Republic of Korea -- Fourth grade students at Seoul American Elementary School toured Yongsan's Water Treatment Plant, Nov. 13. The tour allowed the students to examine the filtration process used on U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan to provide clean water to Community members.

"This is a great opportunity for students to see how we get water on U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan," said Calvin O. Cobbs, chief of Plant Operations and Sanitation Branch, Directorate of Public Works. "Students will learn the process that is used to get the clean water we use every day."

Linda Shin, fourth grade teacher at SAES, said that one of the great things about such a tour was that it allowed students to visually experience the filtration process. By seeing things with their own eyes, the lessons learned in class would make more sense to them. In addition, by seeing real-life applications, students would be able to realize the importance of the lessons they learned in class, to the proper functioning of the Communities they lived in.

"It helps them understand that there is a process that has to happen for everything that we use in life," Cobbs said. "Even the water we use to take a shower each morning has to go through everything they are seeing today, in order to be fit for use."

During the day, two classes of students visited the water treatment plant. These students not only walked through the various facilities in the plant, but they also were asked to solve a simple equation used to help cleanse the water. Each class toured the facility for a total of thirty minutes each.

"The water we drink would make us sick if we didn't clean it," said Elianis Yorta, a fourth grade student at SAES. "Before coming on the trip, though, we didn't know how the water was filtered, and it was fun to see that today."

Page last updated Wed November 14th, 2012 at 01:59