One Army School System increases training
Army readiness is the key objective of the One Army School System, a system that establishes common standards for individual training and maximizes the opportunities for active duty soldiers to train at Reserve or National Guard courses, and vice versa. Pictured here, Soldiers assigned to the 443rd Military Police Company, based in Owings Mills, Md., practice military police movement techniques.

FORT EUSTIS, Va. (Nov. 5, 2012) -- Army readiness is the key objective of the One Army School System, a system that establishes common standards for individual training and maximizes the opportunities for active duty soldiers to train at Reserve or National Guard courses, and vice versa.

Led by U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command in close cooperation with Department of the Army headquarters, the Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserve, the One Army School System, OASS, incorporates the three components to deliver TRADOC-certified training at the best location and time for Soldiers in the Army Force Generation, or ARFORGEN, cycle.

"Strategically, the One Army School System is the best way to maintain individual readiness Army-wide by ensuring consistent standards across all components," said Col. William Abernathy, director of TRADOC's Reserve Component Training Integration Directorate. "The One Army School System standardizes Army individual education regardless of component and saves resources by offering geographical convenience."

Many reserve-component, or RC, schools are already certified as Institutions of Excellence by the TRADOC Quality Assurance Office. Further, many are located on or near Forces Command installations and deliver proponent-certified training closer to the Soldier's home station. Using these RC training sites benefits the Army by reducing the number of Mobile Training Teams; allowing for completion of professional military education in a shorter period of time; increasing opportunities to meet training requirements within the ARFORGEN cycle; and keeping Soldiers at home or returning them home more quickly.

During fiscal year 2012, more than 1,700 active-component, or AC, Soldiers enrolled in RC schools. In fiscal years 2013 and 2014, the Army will continue to fill RC seats with AC Soldiers - seats that would otherwise go unfilled, and in fiscal year 2015, AC Soldiers are scheduled to attend RC schools.

"The Army is committed to maintaining training standards across all components and is carefully and deliberately implementing changes to policy," Abernathy said. "OASS is happening. It's a work in progress."

The One Army School System will enable AC and RC Soldiers to receive a standardized, high-quality education from any Army school, regardless of component, thus optimizing school capacity and usage and providing the Army trained and ready Soldiers.

Page last updated Mon November 5th, 2012 at 07:31