• Safety Specialist Vernell Samples, center, hosts a safety competition Tuesday between Fort Jackson's Directorate of Emergency Services and
Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation staff. Held at the Solomon Center, 'Who Wants to be a Safety Millionaire?' was part of a garrison-wide
safety stand-down that urged Soldiers, staff and civilian contractors to review safety procedures.

    safety1

    Safety Specialist Vernell Samples, center, hosts a safety competition Tuesday between Fort Jackson's Directorate of Emergency Services and Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation staff. Held at the Solomon Center, 'Who Wants to be a Safety...

  • Fort Jackson's Directorate of Emergency Services won Tuesday's 'Who
Wants to be a Safety Millionaire?' challenge at the Solomon Center. From
left are DES Deputy Director Patrick O'Connor, Zach Jenkins, Jacob White
and Nick Walker.

    safety2

    Fort Jackson's Directorate of Emergency Services won Tuesday's 'Who Wants to be a Safety Millionaire?' challenge at the Solomon Center. From left are DES Deputy Director Patrick O'Connor, Zach Jenkins, Jacob White and Nick Walker.

FORT JACKSON, S.C. -- Tuesday's U.S. Army Garrison Fort Jackson safety stand-down was recognized in different ways on Fort Jackson. Some units marked the occasion with formal presentations on safety concerns specific to their mission. Others took the time to brush up on standard protocol.

Fort Jackson's Directorate of Emergency Services and Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation decided to play a game. Personnel from those offices gathered Tuesday morning at the Solomon Center to compete against each other in "Who Wants to be a Safety Millionaire?"

Questions about Fort Jackson's safety standards were asked, points were awarded and, in the end, DES took the top spot.

"All of the questions we asked were from the safety fundamentals course," said Garrison Safety Manager Ron Ross. "Everybody on the installation is required to take it."

The various garrison staffs spent the day doing inspections and reviewing topics such as industrial and administrative safety, and evaluating Occupational Safety and Health Administration Voluntary Protection Programs. The programs recognize employers and workers in the private industry and federal agencies who have implemented effective safety and health management systems and maintain injury and illness rates below national Bureau of Labor Statistics averages for their respective industries.

"We want our standards to be better than Army standards, and to be better than industry standards," Ross said.

"Every day we have civilians and Soldiers who go out there and have accidents that can sometimes be fatal," Garrison Command Sgt. Maj. Ernest Lee told the Solomon Center audience. "I'm glad you took your time to come out here and support this cause."

"It's been a success," Ross said. "We hope that it will make more people come out the next time we have a safety standdown."

The next garrison safety stand-down is scheduled for April.

Page last updated Thu October 25th, 2012 at 09:58