Sergeant Audie Murphy Club inductees epitomize professionalism
U.S. Army Military District of Washington Command Sergeant Major David O. Turnbull (left) stands with MDW Sgt. Audie Murphy president Master Sgt. William Haddon; the latest MDW SAMC inductees Sgt. 1st Class Raphael Johnson, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd U.S. Infantry regiment, legal office noncommissioned officer in charge, and Sgt. 1st Class Steven Ogbuehi, 1st platoon, Charlie Company, 249th Eng. Bn. Prime Power supervisor and Sgt. Major of the Army Raymond F. Chandler. Haddon is assigned to MDW's Army Air Operations Group, 12th Aviation Battalion, Fort Belvoir.

WASHINGTON (Oct. 12, 2012) - - Commitment, confidence and character. Those are the traits that represent professionalism and the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club, according to Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III.

Chandler bestowed those words on the two newest inductees into the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club during a ceremony at the National Defense University at Fort Lesley J. McNair on Friday.

Sgt. 1st Class Raphael Johnson, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3rd U.S. Infantry regiment, legal office noncommissioned officer in charge, and Sgt. 1st Class Steven Ogbuehi, 1st platoon, Charlie Company, 249th Eng. Bn. Prime Power supervisor are the newest inductees into the SAMC to meet this standard.

"When you understand this idea of what we expect of our Soldiers when we say you are a professional, you really think about commitment, confidence and character," said Chandler. "If you are a member of the Audie Murphy club, or are about to be inducted, you are the epitome of professionalism because you have all three of those traits."

Johnson and Ogbuehi said they are honored to be inducted into the club and represent those traits.
"I'm extremely proud," said Ogbuehi of his induction. "This was definitely a lot of hard work and it has definitely paid off. I'm glad I was given this opportunity to be inducted and inducted this way."

"It's a goal I set two duty stations ago," added Johnson. "To have it take place in the Military District of Washington and have the sergeant major of the Army here, I'm very proud of that. It's a landmark in my career, and I just hope I can continue making everyone proud."

Audie Murphy enlisted in the Army a few days after his 18th birthday and was assigned to the famous 15th Infantry Regiment of the 3rd Infantry Division. He fought in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, France and Germany earning every medal for valor that America gives.

Murphy is one of the most highly decorated Soldiers in American history.

Ogbuehi and Johnson agree with Chandler's opinion of SAMC standing for professionalism. Audie Murphy did whatever the Army asked him to do despite the difficulty of the task, and both Ogbeuhi and Johnson feel that is what professionalism means.

"That's what I like to embody, take the hard right and do what the Army tells you to do," said Ogbuehi. "We represent America and people see us on TV. So, I want to uphold that positive image our society has when people see a Soldier."

Johnson feels continuing to improve yourself is another mark of professionalism.
"As NCO's, it's important to not become complacent," said Johnson. "You really should be making these years count. I think that was the biggest part of Sgt. Maj. (of the Army) Chandler's speech is keep striving for excellence no matter what level you are at."

The ceremony included an "I am the Sergeant" presentation by the Old Guard that looked back at every American war or conflict. Members of the Old Guard dressed in the uniforms worn by the Army during each conflict.

Chandler also said in his speech that young NCO's are the future of the Army and they will allow the Army to handle the reduction in personnel.

Johnson and Ogbuehi are happy to take on that responsibility.

"That's why I do some of the things I do, to let Soldiers know, 'If I can do this, you can do this,'" said Ogbuehi. "I look to use this as a cornerstone to show people I want to keep the Army looking good and performing well in the future."

The command sergeants major in today's Army were Johnson's platoon sergeants when he joined the military.

"It's the same cycle, and you hope the good ones become (leading NCOs)," Johnson said. "With the Army downsizing, the guys who excel now will be the leaders of tomorrow."

Page last updated Thu October 18th, 2012 at 10:02