• Lately, Fort Wainwright has been testing its mass notification systems  throughout the installation. The towers are located strategically for use in traditional bugle calls and for mass notification during emergencies. (Photo by Brian W. Schlumbohm, Fort Wainwright PAO)

    Mass notification tower behind Fort Wainwright's Welcome Center

    Lately, Fort Wainwright has been testing its mass notification systems throughout the installation. The towers are located strategically for use in traditional bugle calls and for mass notification during emergencies. (Photo by Brian W. Schlumbohm...

  • A mass notification tower, behind Fort Wainwright's Welcome Center, is one of many placed throughout the post for use in emergencies and to play traditional bugle calls. (Photo by Brian Schlumbohm, Fort Wainwright PAO)

    Mass notification tower located behind Fort Wainwright's Welcome Center

    A mass notification tower, behind Fort Wainwright's Welcome Center, is one of many placed throughout the post for use in emergencies and to play traditional bugle calls. (Photo by Brian Schlumbohm, Fort Wainwright PAO)

  • Mass notification systems are strategically placed and  used to play the traditional bugle calls and are used for mass notification for emergencies or incidents.

    Mass notification system

    Mass notification systems are strategically placed and used to play the traditional bugle calls and are used for mass notification for emergencies or incidents.

FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska (September 21, 2012) Fort Wainwright and surrounding communities may have noticed recently that traditional U.S. Army bugle calls are now audible throughout the day starting at 6:30 a.m. and ending at 10 p.m.

Felicia Jackson, director of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security, said Fort Wainwright has six garrison mass notification systems strategically placed throughout the installation.
The towers are located in the following areas: adjacent to the Welcome Center, Building 3401; the intersection of Ketcham Road and Old Badger Road; northwest of North Town; off Vest Road near the old railhead; south of Neely Road near the intersection of 601st Street and north of Apple Street near Building 1063. These towers are used to play the traditional bugle calls and are used for mass notification for emergencies or incidents.

Jackson said only one of the six towers has been fully operational for several months, and the post has been provided to fix the remaining five.

"Repairing the towers requires a combination of manual work and computer work," Jackson said. "The installed chips must be tested manually, and for this reason you may hear some calls being played outside of their correct times. By the end of October, Garrison hopes to have all six towers fully functional and playing the traditional bugle calls throughout the day."

Jackson said there are 25 traditional bugle calls used by the U.S. Army, but Fort Wainwright only plays nine throughout the day (Assembly is played twice). The bugle calls and the meanings that each tower will play are:

6:30 a.m. -- Reveille: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played at dawn to awaken the troops for morning roll call. It is also used to accompany the raising of the National Colors.

9 a.m. -- Assembly: A bugle call, in the category of formation calls, played to signal troops to assemble at a designated location.

10:20 a.m. (Sunday) -- Church Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal that religious services are about to begin. The call may also be used to announce the formation of a funeral escort.

11:30 a.m. -- Mess Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal personnel that it is mealtime. The same call is used for all meals.

1 p.m. - Assembly: A bugle call, in the category of formation calls, played to signal troops to assemble at a designated location.

4:30 p.m. -- Recall: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all troops that duties or drills should cease.

5 p.m. -- Retreat: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal the end of the official day and is immediately followed by To the Colors.
To the Colors: A bugle call, in the category of ceremonial calls, played to render honors to the nation. It is used when no band is available to render honors, or in ceremonies requiring honors to the nation more than once. To the Color commands all the same courtesies as the National Anthem. It is also used to accompany the lowering of the National Colors.

9 p.m. -- Tattoo: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal that all light in squad rooms be extinguished and that all loud talking and other disturbances be discontinued within 15 minutes.

10 p.m. -- Taps: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal that unauthorized lights are to be extinguished. This is the last bugle call of the day. Taps is also sounded at the completion of a military funeral ceremony.

"We want to thank you for your patience while we work on getting these towers fixed," Jackson said. "We also appreciate letting us know if you hear inaccuracies; this allows us to troubleshoot issues we may not be aware of."

MP3 music files for each bugle call may be heard and shared from the website: http://bands.army.mil/music/bugle/

Questions and comments are welcome online via the Interactive Comment Evaluation comment card; just click the ICE link at www.wainwright.army.mil or call 353-6612.


More bugle calls

The following are calls not currently used at Fort Wainwright:

Adjutant's Call: A bugle call, in the category of formation calls, played to signal that the adjutant is about to form the guard, battalion, or brigade. This call will normally be accompanied by drums.

Attention: A bugle call, in the category of warning calls, played to warn the troops that they are about to be called to attention.

Call to Quarters: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all personnel (not authorized to be absent) to return to their quarters for the night.

Drill Call: A bugle call, in the category of warning calls, played to signal a warning to the troops to turn out for drill.

Fatigue Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all designated personnel to report for fatigue duty.

Fire Call: A bugle call, in the category of alarm calls, played to signal that there is a fire on the post or in the vicinity. The call is also used for fire drill.

First Call: A bugle call, in the category of warning calls, played to signal a warning that personnel will prepare to assemble for a formation.

First Sergeant's Call: A bugle call, in the category of formation calls, played to signal troops that the First Sergeant is about to form the company.

Guard Mounting: A bugle call, in the category of warning calls, played to signal a warning that the guard is about to be assembled for guard mount.

Mail Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal personnel to assemble for the distribution of mail.

Officer's Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all officers to assemble at a designated place.

Pay Day March: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all troops that they will be paid.

Pay Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all troops that they will be paid. The Pay Call consists of the first strain (repeated) of the Pay Day March.

School Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal that school is about to begin.

Sick Call: A bugle call, in the category of service calls, played to signal all troops needing medical attention to report to the dispensary.

To Arms: A bugle call, in the category of alarm calls, played to signal all troops to fall under arms at designated places without delay.


MP3 music files for each bugle call may be heard and shared from the website: http://bands.army.mil/music/bugle/

Page last updated Fri September 21st, 2012 at 16:23