• Soldiers with the 71st Chemical Co., 8th Military Police Brigade,
prepares a back pack which holds a "disclosure solution"during a Hazard
Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology
Demonstration throughout August and September at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Service members were trained, tested and provided feedback on this new prototype for military biological, chemical or radiological decontamination.

    Soldiers prepare a back pack with disclosure solution

    Soldiers with the 71st Chemical Co., 8th Military Police Brigade, prepares a back pack which holds a "disclosure solution"during a Hazard Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology Demonstration throughout August and September...

  • A Soldier from 71st Chemical Co. with 8th Military Police Brigade,
prepares a back pack which holds a "disclosure solution" during a Hazard
Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology
Demonstration throughout August and September at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Service members were trained, tested and provided feedback on this new prototype for military biological, chemical or radiological decontamination.

    Soldier prepares back pack with disclosure solution

    A Soldier from 71st Chemical Co. with 8th Military Police Brigade, prepares a back pack which holds a "disclosure solution" during a Hazard Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology Demonstration throughout August and September...

  • Marines from the 3rd Regiment, out of Kaneohe Bay mix a solution known
as a "disclosure solution" during a Hazard Mitigation, Materiel and
Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology Demonstration throughout August and September at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Service members were trained, tested and provided feedback on this new prototype for military biological, chemical or radiological decontamination.

    Marines mix disclosure solution

    Marines from the 3rd Regiment, out of Kaneohe Bay mix a solution known as a "disclosure solution" during a Hazard Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology Demonstration throughout August and September at Schofield Barracks...

  • A Marine with the 3rd Regiment, monitors and controls the "Mobile
Support Suite", a mobile decontamination unit mounted on a High Mobility
Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle and High Mobility Trailer, during a Hazard
Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology
Demonstration throughout August and September at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Service members were trained, tested and provided feedback on this new prototype for military biological, chemical or radiological decontamination.

    Soldiers prepare disclosure solution

    A Marine with the 3rd Regiment, monitors and controls the "Mobile Support Suite", a mobile decontamination unit mounted on a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle and High Mobility Trailer, during a Hazard Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment...

SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii - Service Members from across U.S. Army Pacific and the 3rd Regiment Marine were recently given a chance to train on some of the military's most promising decontamination prototypes known as Hazard Mitigation, Materiel and Equipment Restoration Advanced Technology Demonstration throughout August and September at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.

Warfighters from 71st Chemical Co. with 8th Military Police Brigade, 540th Quarter Master's Co. out of the 8th Theater Sustainment Command, 2nd Squadron, 14th Cavalry Regiment with 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division and members of the 61st and 62nd Chemical Co. with the 23rd Chemical, Biological, Radiological Nuclear unit out of Fort Lewis, Washington, trained on and provided feedback on the most versatile and combat-friendly decontamination units coming available to the military.

The objective of the HaMMER ATD is to allow service members to work hands on with the equipment and provide valuable feedback to the U.S. Army Operational Test Command, Fort Hood, Texas. Once the equipment has been successfully tested and evaluated, it can be acquisitioned. Acquisition means the equipment has been technically and operationally tested, funded from first use to last use, and will be officially employed by military units.

"This equipment is currently pre-acquisition," said Randy Weiss, . "What we want is to get the equipment into the hands of Soldiers so the users can give us feedback. We want feedback from the platoon leaders all the way down to the lowest private. This feedback is incredibly valuable, it helps us to decipher whether or not we will continue to fund the equipment's progression or not."
"This is kind of like the baby steps of the next generation of equipment that will come out," said John McPherson, Transition Manager for the HaMMER ATD.

What makes the HaMMER equipment attractive to the military is its ability to decrease logistics and increase combat efficiency with more mobility.

"The objective of the program is to reduce the logistical footprint required to decontaminate a vehicle and then get it back out into the fight," said Weiss. "We want to reduce the amount of logistical supplies, the amount of Soldiers, amount of time and even reduce the level of Mission Oriented Protective Posture gear Soldiers are required to wear during the decontamination process."

The HaMMER system is available in a series of capabilities, based on how much decontamination a vehicle has been exposed to. It has a very small, go-bag called a "Mobile on the Move" bag, which contains everything needed for a small amount of contamination. This small version of the system can be carried and used by one individual. Next in line is the "Mobile Support", which is a decontamination system transported via a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle and High Mobility Trailer. This system has a much higher capability of decontamination with more options for cleansing a vehicle which has been tainted with a dangerous pollutant. Lastly, is the "Stationary Support", which is set up on a Light Medium Tactical Vehicle and offers the most decontamination options. Decontamination on this scale is operated by a chemical company.

Once the HaMMER ATD is complete at Schofield Barracks, the information will eventually be provided to OTC and other organizations for perusal.

"The Op Demo report is written by OTC and provided to the Army Evaluation Command. AEC will then use the data from this report, along with several other reports from other tests, to write a system assessment. The System Assessment report is provided to the HaMMER Operational Manager [USARPAC] to support the Joint Military Utility Assessment. In addition, the System Assessment is also provided to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, who will transition it to the Joint Project Manager- Protection," said Shawn Funk, Technical Manager for the HaMMER ATD.

Page last updated Tue September 11th, 2012 at 00:00