Pacific Strykers find great place to train in Korea
Engineers from Bravo Company, 1-27 Infantry Battalion, prepare to assault a possibly mined obstacle with a hook and line, during a platoon training lane at Rodriquez Range in South Korea.

RODRIGUEZ LIVE FIRE COMPLEX, South Korea (Aug. 29, 2012) -- The 1-27th Wolfhound Infantry Battalion, 2nd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, which is currently training at Rodriguez Range with 2nd Infantry Division forces, is part of the greater Stryker force in the Pacific region.

A large portion of the Army's overall Stryker population resides in the Pacific region. The 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, or SBCT, which also belongs to 25th Infantry Division, is stationed in Fort Wainwright, Alaska. The 3rd and 4th SBCTs which are flagged to 2nd ID, but reside with I Corps and are stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

Strykers, designed to serve as a readily deployable force to support light infantry forces already on the ground, are capable of being loaded on aircraft to reduce transit time. The SBCT's goal is to deploy in 96 hours and provide maneuver assets to light forces capable of deploying in 18 hours.

"As a former light infantryman, I am really impressed by the off-road performance of the Stryker," said Maj. Thomas Harris, 1-27th Infantry Battalion executive officer. "It provides an infantry unit with an increased ability to attack and defend and have a longer reach."

Harris explained the Stryker was built to provide speed and maneuverability, while still providing survivability in both open and complex, urban terrain. He also extolled the virtues of a Stryker unit's combined capabilities with: Mobile Gun Systems with a 105 mm rifled cannon, 120 mm mounted mortar systems, reconnaissance, fire-support, engineer, command and infantry carriers, all as part of your vehicle set. You can put together a vehicle set with dynamic capabilities tailored to each mission, said Harris.

Lt. Col. Todd Fox, 1-27th Infantry Battalion commander, said Korea has offered an excellent opportunity to exercise his Strykers, with training ranging from platoon live-fires to their battalion combined live-fire with enablers such as close-air, unmanned aerial vehicle and indirect fire support, provided by 2nd ID and 98th ROKA Field Artillery Battalion, which would not be available back at home station.

"This is the exactly the kind of training we needed to get our troops ready for our upcoming deployment to Afghanistan," said Fox.

Page last updated Wed August 29th, 2012 at 12:04