The brass insignia of the Corps of Interpreters
The brass insignia of the Corps of Interpreters: the INT insignia with the laurel leaf was for officers, and the plain INT disc was worn by enlisted men.

FORT HUACHCUA, Ariz. - As the newly formed Military Intelligence Division expanded with the American Expeditionary Forces, the biggest problem it faced was in finding qualified officers to build up and then maintain the force. Fighting on foreign soil, the need for competent and trustworthy interpreters was of primary concern. A regular Corps of Interpreters was therefore created for the purpose of procuring more suitable personnel and ensuring a closer affiliation between the interpreter effort and the Military Intelligence Section of the General Staff.

The new Corps of Interpreters received an original personnel authorization of 17 captains, 41 first lieutenants, and 72 sergeants of infantry, and every possible effort was made to constantly maintain it at full strength. This was accomplished chiefly through local military boards convened in various parts of the country for the express purpose of conducting interpreter examinations.

"This Week in History" is a feature on the Command History Office website. Those with Army Knowledge Online access, can visit their site at https://ikn.army.mil/apps/mi_history/.

To learn more about the 2012 MI Branch and Corps Commemoration, go to the public website at https://www.ikn.army.mil/apps/mi_comm/.

Page last updated Tue July 17th, 2012 at 00:00