• William F. Moore was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in 2006 and is the deputy to the CASCOM commanding general. Currently, Moore is responsible for overseeing a workforce of more than 4,600 personnel across seven states and managing a budget of more than $280 million to support Army sustainment combat/training developments and the development of more than 100,000 Soldiers and Civilians per year. He also leads the career management of all Army Civilian logisticians on behalf of the Department of the Army G-4, which manages more than 46,000 personnel worldwide. 

Moore was recognized with the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award for his relentless commitment to public service during a ceremony at the Pentagon June 28, hosted by the Secretary of the U.S. Army. He was one of only two U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command senior career employees to be presented with the prestigious awards.

    CASCOM's Top Civilian Honored for Relentless Commitment to Public Service

    William F. Moore was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in 2006 and is the deputy to the CASCOM commanding general. Currently, Moore is responsible for overseeing a workforce of more than 4,600 personnel across seven states and managing a budget...

  • William F. Moore (left), deputy to the Combined Arms Support Command commanding general, presents a CASCOM Army Civilian employee with a certificate for his long years of government service last fall. Moore said he believes in recognizing and honoring Army Civilians who achieve their goals and positively impact their organization. He also said that even for Army Civilians, it's a different way of life than outside of government service; and he expects all of the Civilians within his organization to live by the Army Values.

    Teamwork

    William F. Moore (left), deputy to the Combined Arms Support Command commanding general, presents a CASCOM Army Civilian employee with a certificate for his long years of government service last fall. Moore said he believes in recognizing and honoring...

FORT LEE, Va. -- Continuity through changing times is essential to a successful organization, especially to the U.S. Army.

Through organizational transformation at the U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and the establishment of the Sustainment Center of Excellence, there has been one lead trusted advisor since 2006 fostering continuity over the years and helping to guide the command into the future.

William F. Moore was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in 2006 and is the deputy to the CASCOM commanding general. Currently, Moore is responsible for overseeing a workforce of more than 4,600 personnel across seven states and managing a budget of more than $280 million to support Army sustainment combat/training developments and the training of more than 100,000 Soldiers and Civilians per year. He also leads the career management of all Army Civilian logisticians on behalf of the Department of the Army G-4, which manages more than 46,000 personnel worldwide.

"It's a tremendous responsibility, one which I do not take lightly," said Moore, who applies the life lessons he learned, as the son of a quartermaster Soldier, to accomplishing his duties every day. "I enjoy the challenges the position presents, and it's truly an honor."

Moore was recognized with the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award for his relentless commitment to public service during a ceremony at the Pentagon June 28, hosted by the Secretary of the U.S. Army. He was one of only two U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command employees to be presented with the prestigious award.

Every year, since the inception of the SES in the late '70s, the president bestows the award to a very select group of career senior executives, who demonstrate strength in leadership, while balancing the needs of customers, stakeholders and employees, according to the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. Five percent or less of SES or senior career employees, respectively, may receive the distinct honor. The SES includes most managerial, supervisory and policy positions higher than the general schedule grade of 15.

"Senior Executive Service is like the civilian career equivalent of the general officer ranks. The fact that I was able to achieve this position and work my way into this job was a dream come true, kind of like coming home," said Moore, who's a Virginia native and Virginia Tech alumnus.

Over the years, Moore's role as a leader within the command has evolved.

Originally, the SES's role was solely to serve as a trusted agent of the commander in providing advice and continuity, said Moore. When he joined CASCOM's leadership team in 2006 under then Maj. Gen. Mitchell H. Stevenson, CASCOM's commanding general 2005 - 2008, that role multiplied.

"He told me that he wanted me to wear every hat that he wore," said Moore. "So then, I had the authority to execute a variety of leadership functions, with the only exception being authority under UCMJ [Uniformed Code of Military Justice]. Essentially, I became his chief operating officer."

The responsibilities of the position grew as Moore continued to excel in his duties. Under the next CASCOM general, Moore took on more of a role as a "strategic enabler," he said.

"Under Maj. Gen. Chambers, we also started focusing externally in finding resources for our subordinate organizations," said Moore. "Along the way, a lot of people were starting to notice that my role, along with other key SES positions across the Army, was starting to mount."

Eventually, the Secretary of the Army reviewed these positions, and Moore's position, along with a few others, was elevated to a Tier 2 position earlier this year.

The promotion was a welcome surprise to Moore, he said, who saw it more as an alignment of the rank with the position's current responsibilities.

In addition to the support from his family, Moore attributes his personal career advancement and success to his mentors, he said.

"My mentors would line me up for schools and training over the years. I've been very fortunate to have great mentors who saw my potential," said Moore, who joined the Army workforce as a GS5 engineer. "I was satisfied in my career at the GS15 level, but it was my mentors who helped me reshape my career goals and start looking at the SES."

Because of his mentors and the impact they had on his career, Moore said he takes his role as a mentor very seriously.

"TRADOC has a formal senior leader development program, and I'm now in my fourth year of being a formal mentor," said Moore, who maintains an open door policy when it comes to mentorship.

"Whether it's through the formal program developing individual development plans or someone who comes knocking on my door asking for guidance, I try my best to accommodate," said Moore. "It's important for me to try and help people, who have proven themselves performance wise, make it to the next level."

His advice to Army Civilians seeking career progression is to think broader and understand personal limitations such as geographic mobility.

"Mobility and broader positions are two key factors in career progression. Many of us are in situations where we're not geographically mobile," said Moore, who has spent some of his career serving at the Pentagon and TRADOC headquarters. "I try to get the message across that although geographic mobility is better, job mobility is really important too."

"You have to broaden your experiences, and sometimes you don't have to leave a post to do that," said Moore. "If you are ambitious and take some initiative you can gain a variety of professional experiences.

"Army Civilians should ensure they don't have blinders on, and broaden their career horizon. Just on Fort Lee alone, we have about a platoon size pool of SESs, so there are great opportunities here," said Moore. "It's important to not only focus on the 'now,' but to keep your eyes on the future."

As for Moore's future at CASCOM, he said that his role will most likely continue to evolve as the Army as a profession progresses.

But one thing that will remain unchanged is his commitment to providing the continuity for the command and developing future leaders in the sustainment field.

"One of the things that should be stressed to our Civilians is that they are serving our Army. Even as an Army Civilian, it's a different way of life," said Moore. "I expect all of our Civilians to live by the Army Values and become a part of the Army as a profession."

Page last updated Mon July 16th, 2012 at 00:00