• Guest speaker C.J. Rich, Kramer Productions, speaks to Soldiers July 3 during the Save a Life Tour at the Long Fitness Center, Fort Riley, Kan. The purpose of the event was to help Soldiers grasp the impact of driving under the influence.

    Save a Life Tour aims at teaching impact of drunk driving

    Guest speaker C.J. Rich, Kramer Productions, speaks to Soldiers July 3 during the Save a Life Tour at the Long Fitness Center, Fort Riley, Kan. The purpose of the event was to help Soldiers grasp the impact of driving under the influence.

  • Guest speaker C.J. Rich, Kramer Productions, left, assists a Soldier in driving the simulator July 3 during the Save a Life tour at the Long Fitness Center, Fort Riley, Kan. The simulator allows Soldiers experience the sensation of driving under the influence.

    Save a Life Tour aims at teaching impact of drunk driving

    Guest speaker C.J. Rich, Kramer Productions, left, assists a Soldier in driving the simulator July 3 during the Save a Life tour at the Long Fitness Center, Fort Riley, Kan. The simulator allows Soldiers experience the sensation of driving under the...

FORT RILEY, Kan. -- Soldiers were given the opportunity to experience the sensation of driving while under the influence of alcohol and drugs during the Save a Life Tour July 2 and 3 at the Long Fitness Center.

The national alcohol awareness group, Save a Life Tour, presented its program to help Soldiers grasp the impact of driving under the influence.

The event included video footage, a casket and a simulator to experience impaired drinking.

"We have Soldiers come and drive (the simulator), and as they drive, their level of impairment goes up," said Chris Bowman, prevention coordinator, Army Substance Abuse Program.

It simulates the delays that would occur if one were driving impaired, he said.

Guest speaker C.J. Rich, Kramer Productions, has personal experiences with the consequences of drinking and driving and said he wanted to share his story with others to prevent it from happening again.

Rich lost his mom in a car accident, and his dad was the drunk driver, he said.

After the presentation, Soldiers will often come up to him and say "thank you" for sharing his story, Rich added.

"It was very well-designed, and having him open and close (the presentation) adds a very personal touch where you can actually meet the person (and) see the person, instead of just seeing something on a screen," said Staff Sgt. David Fisher, 24th Transportation Company, 541st Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 1st Sustainment Brigade, 1st Infantry Division.

A pre-survey and a post survey also are conducted to gauge if the program is making a difference in Soldiers' lives.

"Most Soldiers appear to be impacted at some level after viewing the videos and hearing (the guest speaker's) testimony," said Nicole Sizemore, lead prevention coordinator, ASAP.

Throughout the presentation, Rich reminds Soldiers in the audience to be smart in the decisions they make.

"You're not invincible; be responsible for your actions and do the right thing," he said.

Page last updated Fri July 13th, 2012 at 00:00