Engineering upgrade reaps savings at depot
Robin Bonham, T700 engineer in the AMRDEC's Engineering Storage, Analysis, Failure Evaluation and Reclamation Program, conducts an engineering evaluation of a T700 engine inlet part. Bonham was integral to identifying and shipping 1,598 reparable turbine blades from the SAFR facility to AMCOM's Corpus Christi Army Depot's T700 engine maintenance program for inspection, repair and return to service and achieving $1.6 million in cost avoidance.

In April the Aviation and Missile Command and the Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center faced a confluence of opportunities when a production demand for serviceable T700 engine turbine blades was recognized at AMCOM's Corpus Christi Army Depot.
Mission accomplished.
AMRDEC's Engineering Storage, Analysis, Failure Evaluation and Reclamation Program engineers and technicians collaborated with AMCOM Integrated Materiel Management Center and Corpus Christi item and program managers to resolve the parts demand issue. Their solution entailed shipment of 1,598 reparable turbine blades from SAFR to Corpus Christi's T700 engine maintenance program for inspection, repair and return to service in accordance with T700 Depot Maintenance Work Requirements and Maintenance Engineering Call guidance.
This solution facilitated Corpus Christi's continued T700 production, while providing AMCOM IMMC with critical parts supply relief and saving the Defense Department from having to purchase $1.6 million in new parts or possibly suffer part delivery delays and reduced readiness levels across the US Army's fleet of Blackhawk and Apache helicopters.
SAFR is part of the Maintenance Engineering Division of AMRDEC's Aviation Engineering Directorate. The program has been supporting the AMCOM IMMC depot maintenance programs at Corpus Christi since 1989. SAFR program team members provide aviation parts failure analysis, repair development and remediation solutions to military aviation maintainers worldwide in support of critical supply needs and readiness.
Mark A. Velazquez, chief engineer of the SAFR program, stated
"The program collects 'select mission essential' candidate parts that are rejected from maintenance programs that no longer meet current maintenance repair or program criteria to support engineering damage tolerance relief analysis, repair development and parts reclamation," Mark A. Velazquez, chief engineer of the SAFR program, said.
Most important, he added, the SAFR team ensures "that airworthiness requirements are met first and foremost."
SAFR repair development solutions typically reclaim 50 to 75 percent of the parts stored, with more than 2,000 parts transferred to maintenance activities for repair and return to service on an annual basis. In addition to the cost avoidance realized under this effort, the success of SAFR is also evidenced by Value Engineering command cost savings, which typically range between $50 million and $100 million over the fiscal year. In fiscal 2011 alone, the SAFR program exceeded a total VE savings threshold of $1 billion.
The team achieved these savings while completing SAFR facility warehouse renovations which included a new roof system, installation of a 20-ton dehumidification system, an electrical service upgrade to 400 amps, and a 28,000 square foot paved material staging and delivery area to further enhance SAFR operations in support of the war fighter.

Page last updated Fri May 18th, 2012 at 00:00