Soldiers shave heads to raise money for Army Emergency Relief
Members of Company A, 24th Military Intelligence Battalion, pose for a photo on Wiesbaden Army Airfield, Germany, after shaving their heads to raise money for Army Emergency Relief.

WIESBADEN, Germany (May 8, 2012) -- People will pay a lot of money to see their supervisors bald.
 
That has led Company A from the 24th Military Intelligence Battalion in Wiesbaden to raise thousands of dollars for this year's Army Emergency Relief campaign.
 
It started when Capt. Justin Brown and 1st Sgt. Robert Gardner said they would shave their heads for cancer awareness and to raise money for the campaign, said Lt. Julio Torres, Army Emergency Relief, or AER, project officer for the 24th Military Intelligence Battalion of the 66th Military Intelligence Brigade.
 
Lt. John Rollinson soon followed suit, and it was not long until 36 members of the company were bald, said Torres, who also shaved his head.
 
By late April the company had raised $8,270, Torres said, and the battalion as a whole had raised more than $15,000. There are about 330 people in the battalion. With a total of $5,267.33, the battalion's Company C also raised a significant amount of money.
 
In all, the garrison has raised more than $35,000 this year, and there are still a few days left until the campaign ends May 15, said Leary Henry, Wiesbaden's AER officer.
 
"I applaud A Company, 24th and their determination to be the best," Henry said. "This is a unit with leaders that understand the value of the AER program."
 
The AER Office provides emergency financial assistance to Soldiers, both active and retired, Reservists and Guard (activated under Title 10 for 30 consecutive days or more) and to their widows, orphans and spouses with power of attorney, Henry said.
 
"AER is Soldiers helping Soldiers," Henry said.
 
AER also offers interest-free loans and payment amounts that accommodate loan recipients, Henry said.
 
There is no reason Soldiers should take out high-interest loans when AER is available, Henry said.
 
Torres said he supports the program because he can see the results right here at his local garrison.
 
"It's good because it is right here," Torres said, "and you never know when you might need it."

Page last updated Tue May 8th, 2012 at 00:00