Leatherneck LTF expanding to support Soldiers and Marines
Workers place panels on the interior of a new warehouse being built by Army Materiel Command's Logistical Taskforce at Camp Leatherneck. The building will serve as a new class IX warehouse and will allow the LTF to increase their support capability for Marines and Soldiers stationed in Helmand Province.

The Army Materiel Command's Logistical Taskforce at Camp Leatherneck is building a new class IX warehouse to increase their support capability for Marines and Soldiers stationed in Helmand Province.

The new warehouse will enhance the LTF--4's ability to support warfighters because the parts necessary to complete the mission will be on hand.

"Moving indoors is huge," said Ty Miller, the Class IX supervisor for AC First. "Much more efficient."

Currently, spare parts, also known as Class IX, are stored in shipping containers located on various parts of the LTF compound. The new warehouse will be located near the work areas reducing the time spent retrieving parts from the various storage areas.

"Distance is a factor," said Miller. "Sometimes there is an hour or two lag to get a part."

The new warehouse will also be wired with internet so workers can take better advantage of online tracking systems utilized by the Army and Marine Corps. This will allow for better accountability of the parts being stored.

"There will be virtually no distance with the new building," said Miller. "It will increase efficiency by 300 or 400 percent."

The new warehouse will also help protect the parts, many of which have sensitive electronic and plastic pieces, from the blistering heat of Southern Afghanistan to the rain that occasionally falls during the winter months.

"The clean dry environment…should save the government a lot of money in the long run," said Miller.

Once the warehouse is complete, it will allow LTF-4 to increase its level of support to Soldiers and Marines on Camp Leatherneck. The increased access to the parts will also allow them to complete maintenance much more quickly, returning much needed equipment to the fight.

"It's a difference of several months to several weeks," said Miller. "The larger your stock is, the more stuff you can cover. It allows you to cycle stuff through at a much quicker rate."

Page last updated Sat May 5th, 2012 at 00:00