PRMC joins community to help foster successful postsecondary transition for wounded warriors
HONOLULU -- Members from the Pacific Regional Medical Command and Tripler Army Medical Center joined wounded warriors and private sector subject matter experts at a think tank hosted by the Pacific Alliance and the Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa, March 23, here. Panel members pictured left to right are Dr. David Brown, chief, Behavioral Health, PRMC; Howard Reyes and Richard Ries, Care Provider Support Program, PRMC; Genie Joseph, Act Resilient, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Hank Cashen, Solider Family Assistance Center, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii; Dr. Kenneth Hirsch, Traumatic Stress Disorders Program, Veterans Affairs; and Mark Matheson, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Brown moderated the panel and also presented a workshop titled "Cultural Issues: Understanding the Culture of the Military" to assist university leaders and policy makers with recommendations for working successfully with veteran students and their families.

HONOLULU -- Members from the Pacific Regional Medical Command and Tripler Army Medical Center joined wounded warriors and private sector subject matter experts at a think tank hosted by the Pacific Alliance and the Center on Disability Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa, March 23, here.

The Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, or STEM, Think Tank for Wounded Warriors' mission is to support individuals with disabilities in STEM fields.

As part of its commitment to increase the numbers of individuals with disabilities in STEM postsecondary education programs, and ultimately the STEM workforce throughout the Pacific Rim, the focus of the think tank was to generate ideas, recommendations and formulate a multi-stakeholder action plan on how to augment participation of wounded warriors in STEM careers.

Wounded warriors, private sector STEM industry representatives, higher education leaders, veteran program leaders, disability experts, researchers for effective support for wounded warriors, and policy leaders--who determine transition protocol to higher education--were invited to attend to discuss ways of creating pathways that build on veterans' experience and training, as well as support their degree attainment.

Identifying ways to support veterans as they make the transition from the military to employment and self-sufficiency--through the pursuit of higher education in 21st century STEM skills--was the primary goal. An action plan will be developed from ideas that are generated during the think tank.

Members of the Department of the Army, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the civilian sector joined forces to create the panel that addressed identifying, accessing and supporting wounded warriors in Hawaii and the Pacific. Panel members included Dr. David Brown, chief, Behavioral Health, PRMC; Howard Reyes and Richard Ries, Care Provider Support Program, PRMC; Genie Joseph, Act Resilient, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Hank Cashen, Solider Family Assistance Center, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawaii; Dr. Kenneth Hirsch, Traumatic Stress Disorders Program, Veterans Affairs; and Mark Matheson, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC).

The STEM Think Tank for Wounded Warriors was sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

Page last updated Fri March 30th, 2012 at 18:46