Army Gaming conference
Col. Robert "Pat" White's avatar explains gaming's importance in Army training as part of a video shown at the Army Games for Training User Conference. White could not attend the Orlando, Fla., conference and addressed it through the video. He is the deputy commander of the Combined Arms Center " Training (CAC-T), Fort Leavenworth, Kan. The video was created at the National Simulation Center, which is part of CAC-T.

ORLANDO, Fla. (March 26, 2012) -- An avatar of Col. Robert "Pat" White, deputy commander of the Combined Arms Center - Training, told an Army conference today that gaming will play a critical role in training.

White's avatar was part of a video that presented the colonel's pre-recorded comments at the Army Games for Training User Conference.

"I'm sorry I couldn't get to Orlando in person so I sent a 'Mini Me' to fill in," White said. "And I have to say, he looks pretty good." The video was created at the National Simulation Center.

White leads the Combined Arms Center - Training, or CAC-T, at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., which supports and develops training throughout the Army. The National Simulation Center, also at Fort Leavenworth, is part of CAC-T.

"One of my responsibilities is setting the future course for training in the Army," he said. "And as you all know, gaming has a significant role in that future."

White said he knows from his experience as a battalion and brigade commander that gaming prepares Soldiers for live training and saves money.

"Every leader struggles with limited time, dollars and resources," he said. "Those same leaders know it's better to practice something first before you do it for real in live training. Live training is where our highest risk and greatest expense comes from."

White said gaming has demonstrated that:

• The Army rapidly adopts new technologies.
• Gaming technologies take situational and decision-making training to the individual Soldier.
• Soldiers and leaders learn by completing scenarios multiple times.

Soldiers can access a wide array of training products at: https://milgaming.army.mil. The site contains programs to learn ethics, air assault tactics, defensive operations and other skills.

"Gaming already has changed the way the Army trains and educates -- changed it for the better," White said.

Page last updated Tue March 27th, 2012 at 08:36