• At the Feb. 10 Directorate of Emergency Services Professional Development Program Tour, firefighters demonstrate the method of extraction which could occur at a vehicle accident.

    Professional Development Program tour

    At the Feb. 10 Directorate of Emergency Services Professional Development Program Tour, firefighters demonstrate the method of extraction which could occur at a vehicle accident.

  • Julie Rivera, physical security specialist, points out aspects of the Closed Circuit Television System, which is supported by the gate cameras at entry points of Stewart-Hunter.

    Professional Development Program tour

    Julie Rivera, physical security specialist, points out aspects of the Closed Circuit Television System, which is supported by the gate cameras at entry points of Stewart-Hunter.

  • Carl T. Smith, Jr., Conservation Law Enforcement Branch, explains the many facets of his section that affects Stewart and Hunter to the Civilians on the PDP tour, Feb. 10.

    Professional Development Program tour

    Carl T. Smith, Jr., Conservation Law Enforcement Branch, explains the many facets of his section that affects Stewart and Hunter to the Civilians on the PDP tour, Feb. 10.

FORT STEWART, Ga. - The Fort Stewart Directorate of Emergency Services was the next in line playing host to the quarterly Garrison Professional Development Program participants, Feb. 10, all of whom are fellow Civilians of the garrison workforce.

The DES tour complies with the directive established by Fort Stewart-Hunter Army Airfield Garrison Commander, Col. Kevin Milton. The PDP's intent is to broaden the awareness of key leaders within various garrison agencies on the mission and responsibilities of other garrison agencies.

Julie Herrmann, Stewart-Hunter director of emergency services; Lt. Col. Frances Fullard, Provost Marshal Officer; and Keith Janowski, emergency plans specialist for DES, all noted that each aspect of the visit would make each person realize that DES is more than just the pre-conceived notion of writing and issuing traffic tickets.

"This is an opportunity to showcase DES," said Herrmann. "It's important for our fellow Civilians to know that in this 24-7 operation, it is our mission to keep the community safe and secure."

The manpower Herrmann has to keep DES on its non-stop operation can be attributed to the 340 Civilians, borrowed military manpower, 385th Military Police, Provost Marshal Office, and brigade combat teams that provide support on and off the roads.

With her extensive background in the field as a Provost Marshall and a director, Lt. Col. Fullard stated however this was the first time she had ever seen a PDP done. "This is a great thing Col. Milton has done for all directorates to see what others have done," she said.

"I think this tour builds a cohesive team," said Janowski. "This shows how pieces fit into the puzzle for the garrison mission."

The first stop for the day began at the new fire station on Fort Stewart. James Krikava, Matt Henderson, Jose Sanchez, Ezekiel Vaughns, William Goode, and Perry Smith demonstrated and explained that in addition to putting out fires, firefighters provide training on fire prevention, can assist in hazardous material calls, and have direct involvement in extraction of persons from vehicles in the case of serious vehicular accidents.

Known to many as game wardens, the Conservation Law Enforcement Branch showed the tour more to their operations than hunting. They were told of the managed hunts, the protection of historical sites and the 62 known cemeteries on the installation, boating and water recreation activities, and stray animals. Between Carl Smith, Jr. and James Phillips, the group saw a variety of hands-on stuffed, photographed, and equipment used in the CLEB.

The next stop at the DES-Physical Security area under the direction of Arthur Weston, had the group divided up into sections for information on the installation's Closed Circuit Television system, Integrated Commercial Intrusion Detection System, tag office, and gate guards information.

Final stop on the tour was at the military police station where the group observed a live taze on an individual; met military working dog handler Sgt. George Talkington and Gero; viewed the latest in drug paraphernalia; listened and observed as Cpl. Khryshell Beebe of the Special Response Team described their job; and saw the non-comfort afforded to prisoners in the Prisoner Transport vehicle, explained by Sgt. Edward Dillard.

Inside the military station, Dorethea Mobley, former military policewoman and now the patrol division supervision, explained the inside operations from the desk sergeant to prisoner processing.

"The tour was just what I expected it to be," said Cambell Matus, directorate of human resources employee, on the tour. "It has really been good."

When it was all said and done, Kristy Griffen, directorate of logistics employee and Air Force Family Member, said she knew it was going to be a great tour from the very beginning.

"I wanted to learn more about the organization … what our Soldiers, Military Police, and Civilians do on a daily basis. I think it is great how we have incorporated technology in improving our capabilities," said Grifffen.

Page last updated Thu February 16th, 2012 at 00:00