• Josef A. Molitor, a German local national who recently retired from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, poses next to a statue of George Washington during a trip to the United States just after the MA-M was recognized as the winner of the Supply Excellence Award at the Department of the Army level in 2005. The MA-M won the DA-level award a total of three times.

    A lifetime of service

    Josef A. Molitor, a German local national who recently retired from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, poses next to a statue of George Washington during a trip to the United States just after the MA-M was...

  • Josef A. Molitor, a German local national who recently retired from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, discusses equipment issues during an inspection. Throughout his career, Molitor 
worked in more than five different positions with the MA-M.

    A lifetime of service

    Josef A. Molitor, a German local national who recently retired from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, discusses equipment issues during an inspection. Throughout his career, Molitor worked in more than five...

  • Josef A. Molitor, a German local national who recently retired from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, receives the Supply Excellence Award from Gen. Erik K. Shinseki, former Army chief of staff, Sept. 20, 1999 during a ceremony at the Alexandria Hilton Hotel in Alexandria, Va. Molitor helped MA-M win the Department of the Army level award on three different occasions.

    A lifetime of service

    Josef A. Molitor, a German local national who recently retired from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, receives the Supply Excellence Award from Gen. Erik K. Shinseki, former Army chief of staff, Sept. 20...

KAISERSLAUTERN, Germany -- For some people, preparing for retirement can be a very stressful and overwhelming experience. There are many questions that have to be answered such as: Will I be able to maintain a decent lifestyle? Has everything been done to insure my smooth transition? Is my medical coverage sufficient? Is my replacement properly trained? The questions can go on and on and on. But perhaps the most common question that begs for an answer is: What am I going to do next?

For Josef A. Molitor, a german local national who dedicated 44 years of civilian service to the U.S. Army, and recent retiree from the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim, the answer to the question, what are you going to do next is simple.

"I'm going to take care of my grand children," said Molitor.

"After more than four decades of taking care of people, it seems suiting that Mr. Molitor would move on and continue to do the same thing," said Rainer Paulus, the director of Maintenance Activity in Mannheim, Germany, and Molitor's boss.

Molitor started out his lifetime of service and dedication Feb. 6, 1967 at the age of 18. He studied an apprenticeship as a vehicle mechanic in Weinheim, Germany. Upon completion of his schooling, he found himself in search of a job.

Coincidently, at that time, the civilian chief of the Mannheim Equipment Maintenance Center, now referred to as MA-M, lived in Molitor's hometown of Abtsteinach, Germany. Molitor asked him if they were hiring workers, he was then directed to the civilian personnel office and shortly after, he began his service.

Throughout his career, Molitor worked several different jobs and positions before ending up as a general supply specialist supervisor. From 1967 till 1972 he worked as a vehicle mechanic. In Nov. of 1972 he changed his job to an expeditor of the production control office. In Feb. of 1973 he accepted a supervisor position of the supply support account. Molitor worked in that position until April of 1985 when he switched jobs and became a computer operator. In 1991, Molitor worked as a general supply specialist supervisor right up until his retirement.

"Throughout his career, Mr. Molitor has worked many positions and with each position he has given total dedication and support to his job and to the U.S. Army," said Paulus.

Although Molitor served his native country by being a member of the German Bundeswehr for 18 months, he has dedicated a majority of his life to the U.S. Army.

Throughout his career, Molitor managed to help the Maintenance Activity-Mannheim win the Supply Excellence Award for the Table of Distribution Allowances-large category at the Department of the Army level in 1999, 2005 and 2006.

According to Paulus, the MA-M would not have received the SEA without Molitor's knowledge and contributions. Additionally Molitor helped the MA-M win the SEA nine times for the 21st Theater Sustainment Command and seven times at the U. S. Army Europe level.

"Being a part of an organization and helping them to win not one but three Department of the Army level awards is my most proud accomplishment throughout my career," said Molitor. "That shows the level of quality and professionalism of the people that I was working with."

Molitor helped the MA-M win the award nine times at the 21st Theater Sustainment Command Level and seven times at the United States Army Europe level for their category.

According to Molitor, winning those prestigious awards was a proud accomplishment in his career, but he is most proud of his beautiful family.

"I got married in 1973 and have been married ever since to my wonderful wife Ingrid," said Molitor. "If it wasn't for the support of my wife and kids, I couldn't have accomplished half the things I accomplished at my Job."

Molitor and Ingrid have two sons; Alexander (34) and Marco (28). According to Molitor, his family was steadfast in supporting him throughout his career. He normally worked eight hours a day and was usually home every evening to spend with his family.

"Occasionally I would have to work late nights but my family understood and always stood behind me," Molitor said.

Now after 44 years of service to the U.S. Army, 18 months of service to the German Bundeswehr, getting married to a beautiful wife and having two children, and helping his workplace win three DoA awards, Molitor prepares himself for the next mission in his life, raising two grand children.

"My oldest son has two daughters, the oldest is three and the youngest is one year old," said Molitor. "It will be my main pleasure to take care of my grand children. That is my new mission."

"I will miss my job and most of all I will miss my co-workers and friends that I worked with," said Molitor. "When you are eight hours every day with the same people for many years, they are not just your co-workers, they become your family also. My coworkers are my second family."

"Mr. Molitor was like a dad to me, he was a mentor and he was a good friend," said Fritz Hoffstaetter, a supply technician with the MA-M. "Now that he is retiring I will miss his friendship the most."

According to Hoffstaetter, Molitor wanted to get together with all his co-workers and friends every three months for coffee or dinner. But for now, Molitor will only focus on taking care of his grand children.

Page last updated Wed January 25th, 2012 at 00:00