773rd CST takes on EMAT responsibilities
Maj. Philip C. Wolfe (l), the detachment commander of the Emergency Medical Assistance team, SGT Daniel C. Lewis (center), and SFC Jose S. Mora, the NCOIC of the EMAT detachment, case the detachment's colors during the deactivation ceremony Jan 11 at Tompkins Barracks in Schwetzingen, Germany.

SCHWETZINGEN, Germany -- The Emergency Medical Assistance Team, based in Schwetzingen, Germany, cased its colors and deactivated at Tompkins Barracks here Jan 11, ending its six-year Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High-Yield Explosive (CBRNE) reconnaissance mission in Europe.

Although the EMAT was deactivated, the need for this capability remains. Taking up the mission is the Army Reserve's 773rd Civil Support Team, 7th Civil Support Command, based in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Activated in 2009 and fully operational since 2010, the 773rd CST possesses the unique skill, expertise and capability to carry out what is expected of an EMAT.

To prepare for the transition, the 773rd CST and EMAT conducted several joint training exercises, the most recent being last month during Cobalt Dragon. This exercise provided the 773rd the opportunity to cross-train with EMAT and ensure they are prepared for its new additional mission.

Lt. Col Leslie Dillard, the commander of the 773rd CST, explains why her unit is the best choice for this critical mission. The Soldiers of the 773rd CST are active reserve and have completed the professional medical and hazardous materials courses and training and possess the needed experience.

EMAT was created in response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks when U.S. Army Europe directed an extensive assessment of Consequence Management reaction and assessment capabilities. USAREUR recognized that an organic forward stationed CM capability was required to meet the theater European Command and Joint Strategic Capability plan.

According to Brig. Gen Mark Hendrix, the commanding general of the 7th CSC, the EMAT's deactivation is a result of force structure decisions, but emphasizes the critical need for this capability.

In the context of today's global security environment of asymmetric threats against civilian populations by extremist and non-state actors, Hendrix stated that, "the EMAT mission of consequence management is more important than ever."

For more information, the media may contact the 7th Civil Support Command public affairs office by email at michael.e.stewart32.mil@mail.mil, or by phone at German local: 0631 411 4725, German cell: 0162 270 4936.

Page last updated Mon January 23rd, 2012 at 00:00