Community Based Medical Homes provide quality care
Community Based Medical Home clinics serve mainly Family members of active-duty Soldiers and are located in the communities where Army Families live. The clinics are an implementation of the Patient Centered Medical Home concept, a model of primary care delivery being adopted across military and leading civilian healthcare systems.

Since the first off-post Army medical clinic opened outside Fort Campbell, Ky., in December 2010, 12 more Community Based Medical Home clinics have opened near Army installations across the U.S. and plans for eight more sites are underway.

The Army-run, primary care clinics serve mainly Family members of active-duty Soldiers and are located in the communities where Army Families live. The clinics are an implementation of the Patient Centered Medical Home concept, a model of primary care delivery being adopted across military and leading civilian healthcare systems.

"Overall, patients receiving care in the Community Based Medical Homes are delighted with their care and the care experience. According to satisfaction surveys, many clinics have achieved a 100 percent satisfaction rate and others are in the high 90s," said Lt. Col. Timothy Caffrey, primary care staff officer at U.S. Army Medical Command.

Caffrey said the overall goal is to bring a patient-centered approach to beneficiaries. A key goal is to make sure that when patients come in for care they see their primary care team. This emphasis on continuity is a key component of the Patient Centered Medical Home model.

Another key objective is that patients partner with a team of healthcare providers -- physicians, nurses, behavioral health professionals, pharmacists, and others -- to develop a comprehensive, personal healthcare plan. That healthcare team works with each patient over time to take care of health issues as they arise, ensure delivery of prevention screening and services, manage chronic conditions, and promote a spirit of health, wellness and trust.

Because military Families relocate regularly, the medical homes are designed to deliver a common experience of care that makes navigation of their healthcare system easier and more consistent as they move with the Army.

"The intent is to provide one patient experience of care across Army Medicine that will be consistent whether you receive your care at the Community Based Medical Home or receive your care from a primary care clinic on post," Caffrey said.

Each Community Based Medical Home clinic serves approximately 8,100 patients and is staffed with six core provider teams. The core team consists of a primary care manager and two nurses or medics. The clinics also have laboratory staff, pharmacy staff, behavioral health providers, an administrative team, case management nurses and additional nursing staff to provide expanded care options for patients.

Caffrey said positive feedback indicates that the concept is successfully meeting patients' needs and expectations. He said patients especially appreciate the level of customer service they receive and the attentiveness the healthcare providers bring to the encounter.

"Many of them are saying that this is the best experience of care they have had in Army Medicine so I think we are on the right track," he said.

For more information about Community Based Medical Homes, visit http://www.armymedicine.army.mil/cbmh.

Page last updated Tue January 17th, 2012 at 16:52