67th Armor Soldiers train Afghan police to detect IEDs
Sgt. Michael Quandt, an Afghan Local Police trainer with Company D, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, attached to 2nd Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, relays instructions through an interpreter to an ALP officer during an improvised explosive device training lane at Joint Combat Outpost Masaw, Afghanistan, Sept. 15, 2011. The lane focused on teaching the ALP about identifying and securing IEDs.

FARAH, Afghanistan, Sept. 21, 2011 -- Soldiers assigned to the Afghan Local Police training detachment with Company D, 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, attached to 2nd Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, conducted an improvised explosive device lane at Joint Combat Outpost Masaw, Afghanistan, Sept. 15.

Planning for the lane took place Sept. 12-13 and focused on teaching the Afghan Local Police , or ALP, about identifying and securing improvised explosive devices, which are commonly known as IEDs.

The ALP received classroom training that provided an overview on the components of an IED, common locations for emplacement of IEDs and proper steps to cordon the IED in preparation for an explosive ordnance team.

"Providing the ALP with the tools necessary to independently identify and clear IED sites allows them to take one step closer to transitioning to a self-sustaining force," said 1st Lt. Simone Luca, executive officer of the ALP training detachment with Company D.

After the classroom training portion was completed, the ALP participated in the IED lanes. There were two separate IED lanes, and ALP members were given a task and purpose in order to guide them through each of the scenarios.

ALP were directed to identify any IEDs or caches, practice reporting the incident to their higher headquarters, and to identify the type of IED in order to request Explosive Ordnance Disposal, or EOD, support.

"Since we assumed responsibility for the Masaw battle space, we have watched the ALP make vast improvements," said Capt. Brian Kern, ALP training detachment commander. "The ALP program is vital for a secure and prosperous Afghanistan."

Kern went on to say, "The ALP members displayed their ability to identify IEDs, which is one of the biggest threats in this area of operations. I am confident that they will be able to secure and protect their fellow citizens."

Page last updated Wed September 21st, 2011 at 00:00