• A 1st Cavalry Division Soldier shows Joaquin Ayala a vintage carbine during a tour of the Horse Cavalry Detachment. The "Mighty" 407th Army Field Support Brigade sponsored its first Bring Your Kids to Work Day Aug. 19 at Fort Hood, Texas.

    'Mighty' kids get a history lesson

    A 1st Cavalry Division Soldier shows Joaquin Ayala a vintage carbine during a tour of the Horse Cavalry Detachment. The "Mighty" 407th Army Field Support Brigade sponsored its first Bring Your Kids to Work Day Aug. 19 at Fort Hood, Texas.

  • Members of the "Mighty" 407th Army Field Support Brigade accompany their children on a tour of the 1st Cavalry Division barn at Fort Hood, Texas, during the brigade's Bring Your Kids to Work Day, Aug. 19.

    Kids join parents at 407th AFSB outing

    Members of the "Mighty" 407th Army Field Support Brigade accompany their children on a tour of the 1st Cavalry Division barn at Fort Hood, Texas, during the brigade's Bring Your Kids to Work Day, Aug. 19.

  • Col. Danny F. Tilzey, 407th Army Field Support Brigade commander, presents Timothy Jarrett with a certificate of participation at the end of the brigade's Bring your Kids to Work Day, Aug. 19 at Fort Hood, Texas

    From a 'Mighty' man to a 'Mighty' kid

    Col. Danny F. Tilzey, 407th Army Field Support Brigade commander, presents Timothy Jarrett with a certificate of participation at the end of the brigade's Bring your Kids to Work Day, Aug. 19 at Fort Hood, Texas

FORT HOOD, Texas -- The "Mighty" 407th Army Field Support Brigade hosted its first Bring Your Kids to Work Day Aug. 19.

"Why are you here today?" Col. Danny Tilzey, 407th AFSB commander, asked the kids.

"To have fun," shouted one child. "To play games," shouted another.

"Maybe, but that's not the real reason," said Tilzey. Another child raised his hand and said, "To learn what our Moms and Dads do at work."

Moms and Dads of the Mighty 407th manage field-level sustainment operations and Directorate of Logistics operational control for about one third of the United States.

"Our unit's mission focuses on logistically supporting Soldiers and military units, so we wanted to show the kids what their parents do, and introduce them to some of the rich history of the Soldiers and units we support," said Tilzey. "If you think about it, not only do we get to spend time with our children in a different setting, but I'm sure this particular exercise embeds in their minds that careers are important."

More than 25 children, age 4-17, began the day by shadowing their parents at work.

Parents and children from the 407th AFSB, Army Field Support Battalion-Hood, and the Communications Electronics Command (CECOM) started their day with a safety brief, followed by scavenger hunt during which children solved a series of riddles about the organization.

The group then traveled to the 1st Cavalry Division Horse Detachment, where Soldiers gave the children a tour of the horse barn and displayed their skills at making such things as horseshoes, saddles and boots.

"I've been at Fort Hood for many years and didn't even know this was hereā€¦this is great!" said Neal Jarrett, a CECOM employee.

For lunch, the children enjoyed a pizza party complete with magic tricks by Stephen Tilzey, showing some of his dad's skill at commanding an audience. They also met Sebrina Dykes, Military Family Life Consultant, who talked about the MFLC program.

The children finished off the day with a 1st Cavalry Museum scavenger hunt and a visit to the Engagement Skills Trainer, which provides realistic marksmanship and combat scenario training.

Donna Gemba, event co-coordinator and Family Readiness Group secretary, said the goal for the day was to "invite the kids to see what mommy, daddy, grandma or grandpa do, answer their questions, foster an environment to meet other children in the organization and let them know they matter. It was wonderful to see the families and children interacting. You could tell they had a great time."

"As we all know, raising children is one of the most awesome responsibilities any human being can face," Tilzey said. "Therefore, we need to understand that our conduct as parents influences our children, not just in their early years, but for their entire life. Hopefully, today influenced a child in a positive manner."

Page last updated Wed September 7th, 2011 at 00:00