AUSA honors long-time member
Maj. Gen. Anthony G. Crutchfield, USAACE and Fort Rucker commanding general, presents retired Col. Selden Bailey with an AUSA Outstanding Achievement award for his years of service to the organization during the AUSA annual Wiregrass Chapter breakfast in Ozark.

FORT RUCKER, Ala. (August 25, 2011) -- The Association of the U.S. Army honored one of its long-time members during its annual Wiregrass Chapter breakfast in Ozark Aug. 18.

Retired Col. Selden Bailey, 91, received an Outstanding Achievement award for his years of service to AUSA, said Tom Walker, AUSA Wiregrass Chapter president. Bailey was the charter vice president in 1957.

"AUSA recognizes Soldiers and civilians alike," Walker said. "(Bailey) has been doing this for so many years and served his country with honors. He's transferred that service over to the community, and he's just an upfront guy and been a great asset to AUSA."

Bailey said he didn't get into service to earn awards or to be recognized, but to help people and serve his community and country.

"I didn't get into (service) thinking I was going to be recognized for something," Bailey said. "You just fall into a situation and have to do a job. You determine what that job has to accomplish and go about your business."

After the presentation of the award, Maj. Gen. Anthony G. Crutchfield, U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence and Fort Rucker commanding general, said he, too, had been inspired by Bailey's service and thanked him for all of his helpful advice.

"I always appreciate our conversations, I learn something every time we talk," said Crutchfield. "It's men like him who've laid the groundwork for other Soldiers like us. (He) is truly a patriot, a Soldier and a great citizen of this country."

Those who attended the breakfast also received a safety briefing from Brig. Gen. William T. Wolf, U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center commanding general. Wolf talked to those in attendance about the importance of remaining vigilant and about safety trends in the Army.

"Driving is our biggest challenge," Wolf said. "What we have to do as leaders is continue educating them. Our Soldiers are just like the great American public and they enjoy getting out on the road."

Wolf said the primary number of road accidents involving Soldiers also involved motorcycles.

Page last updated Wed August 24th, 2011 at 00:00