• (From left) Juliet Synder, 9; Charles Wilson, 13; John Byers, 8; and Rachel Bostick, 14, compete for the ball. The children competed for the “World Cup” during the camp on the APG North soccer field July 11-15.

    (From left) Juliet Synder, 9; Charles Wilson...

    (From left) Juliet Synder, 9; Charles Wilson, 13; John Byers, 8; and Rachel Bostick, 14, compete for the ball. The children competed for the “World Cup” during the camp on the APG North soccer field July 11-15.

  • Christian Otto (right) 6, kicks the ball during a game called “soccer bowling” as Challenger Sports British Soccer coach John Dunbar looks on. Child, Youth and School Services hosted Challenger Sports British Soccer Camp at the APG North soccer field July 11-15. The camp brings coaches who are exclusively trained in the United Kingdom to teach children the fundamentals of soccer.

    Christian Otto (right) 6, kicks the ball during...

    Christian Otto (right) 6, kicks the ball during a game called “soccer bowling” as Challenger Sports British Soccer coach John Dunbar looks on. Child, Youth and School Services hosted Challenger Sports British Soccer Camp at the APG North soccer...

By Rachel Ponder
APG News

Despite the heat, 40 children, ages 5-14, participated in Challenger Sports British Soccer Camp at the Aberdeen Proving Ground North soccer field July 11-15.
The annual summer camp, hosted by Child Youth and School Services, brings coaches who are exclusively trained in the United Kingdom to teach soccer fundamentals and techniques to improve their game.
According to the Challenger Sports British Soccer Web site, the goal of the British soccer program is to deliver “quality coaching with a unique British cultural twist.”
The website also lists Challenger Sports as the most popular soccer camp provider in the United States and Canada.
This year more than 900 British coaches will train more than 150,000 boys and girls at 3,500 camps and clinics.
During the mornings, the 5- to 6-year-old group participates in mini-camp, learning skills through games and contests including “soccer bowling,” where children have fun knocking down orange cones by kicking the soccer ball.
“This activity teaches passing and accuracy,” said John Dunbar who taught the mini camp. “We want them to learn and have fun at the same time.”
Dunbar said he is equally enjoying teaching soccer and experiencing life on America’s East Coast.
“I like traveling and meeting new people every week, and teaching children of all ages how to play soccer,” Dunbar. “But the main thing is that children have fun.”
During the day, children ages 6-14 learn techniques that range from dribbling and passing to shooting, tackling and defending.
Participants are divided into “countries” to compete for the World Cup. The countries received points by winning games throughout the week and participating in challenges where they learn about the country.
“It gets competitive,” said 12-year-old Kierra Sewell, who has attended the camp for four years. “I play soccer in school and this year I will play at APG. I look forward to the camp every year, and each year I learn something new.
“Plus the coaches are pretty cool,” she said. “They learned and grew up in a country where this sport is very popular; they know how to play.”
Susan Byers, who had three children in soccer camp this year, watched from the sidelines. She said the annual activity is a Family favorite and is a win-win for all involved.
“My children have been attending this camp for three years and they love it. The coaches keep the children entertained and motivated with games throughout the day. I also like how they emphasize good sportsmanship and teamwork.”
For information on upcoming CYSS Sports activities visit http://www.apgmwr.com/family/youth_sports.html or call 410-306-2297.

Page last updated Fri July 22nd, 2011 at 00:00