• Brigadier General Daniel L. York relinquishes command of the 104th Training Division (LT) by passing his unit colors to Major General Robert P. Stall, Commander, 108th Training Command. The change of command ceremony took place at Joint Base Lewis-McChord on June 4, 2011. (Photo by: Sgt. First Class Lisa M Litchfield)

    Timberwolves welcome a new alpha

    Brigadier General Daniel L. York relinquishes command of the 104th Training Division (LT) by passing his unit colors to Major General Robert P. Stall, Commander, 108th Training Command. The change of command ceremony took place at Joint Base...

  • Col. Kurt Hardin assumes command of the 104th Training Division (LT) by receiving his unit colors from Command Sgt. Maj. Juan Loera, Command Sgt. Maj., 104th Training Division (LT). The change of command ceremony took place at Joint Base Lewis-McChord on June 4, 2011. (Photo by: Sgt. First Class Lisa M Litchfield)

    Timberwolves welcome a new alpha

    Col. Kurt Hardin assumes command of the 104th Training Division (LT) by receiving his unit colors from Command Sgt. Maj. Juan Loera, Command Sgt. Maj., 104th Training Division (LT). The change of command ceremony took place at Joint Base Lewis-McChord...

JOINT BASE LEWIS - McCHORD, Wash.,(June 04, 2011) " “Without a future, history has no meaning.” With those words, Brig. Gen. Daniel L. York relinquished command of the 104th Training Division (Leader Training) Timberwolves to Col. Kurt Hardin in a ceremony today at the Staff Sgt. Coby G. Schwab Reserve Center here.

The Timberwolves, along with more than a hundred guests, honored chief of staff and incoming commander Hardin as he accepted the colors from reviewing officer and commander of the 108th Training Command, Maj. Gen. Robert P. Stall.

“Being a Commander is one of the toughest, and yet at the same time, one of the most rewarding jobs in the military,” Stall said. “The Commander is responsible for all that happens and all that doesn’t happen.”

Stall continued on to challenge the Timberwolves to “reflect the very best in our nation by training the Soldiers who will defeat the enemies of freedom and the proponents of terror,” and reminded them that “together we are, and always will be, Army Strong.”

York has served in the 104th Training Division for the past 12 years, and has been the commander for the past 34 months. He is leaving to take charge of the 86th Training Division, Fort McCoy, Wis.

“It is with profound gratitude that I stand before you this morning to commend you for your excellence,” York expressed. “I count it the greatest of privileges that God allowed me to serve in your ranks, to wear this patch that men like Art Sorensen and so many others of our World War II heroes bled and died that we might stand here. Their sacrifice and example must always motivate and guide us lest we lose our way.”

Hardin, who up until the time of the ceremony was serving as the division chief of staff, is no stranger to the Timberwolves’s proud history and lineage.

Formerly the 104th Infantry Division and lauded for their significant contributions to World War II during 195 straight days of combat activity, the 104th Training Division currently provides education and training to future officers.

In addition the 104th provides reception support to the Army Training Centers for an Army at war in support of a nation at war.

Previous duty stations and staff assignments have left Hardin well-versed in the requirements for his new position.

Prior to his assignment to the 104th, Hardin’s previous assignments included assault fire platoon leader, tactical control officer and assistant operations officer of the 6th Battalion, 52nd Air Defense Artillery (Hawk) in Giebelstadt and Wurzburg, Germany; commander of Battery A, 1st Battalion, 67th Artillery, commander of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 44th Air Defense Artillery Regiment and aide-de-camp for the deputy commanding general, I Corps, all at Fort Lewis, Wash.

As a Timberwolf, Hardin has seen a marked increase in responsibilities moving from battalion commander of the 3-414th, to brigade executive officer of the 8th Brigade, commander of the 1st Brigade and finally division chief of staff prior to his selection as division commander.

Hardin took the time to thank York for his leadership as he assumed command.

“Today is a special day in my career as I assume the reins of the Timberwolves,” Hardin said. “I want to thank Brig. Gen. York and his wife Kathleen for their leadership and stewardship of the division for the past three years. Their command partnership paved the way for the division to be where it is today.”

Hardin also had words of challenge for his new command.

“We cannot become complacent,” Hardin exhorted. “We live in a time of change. Today’s military is transforming from what we have grown to know to the military of the future and the unknown; the security of the United States depends on the ability of the Army to successfully transform itself to meet the ever-evolving threat.”

With Hardin leading the pack as the times change, the Timberwolves are sure to be a howling success.

Page last updated Fri July 8th, 2011 at 00:00